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Māori news stories for the week ending 27 July 2012

Māori news stories for the week ending 27 July 2012

  • On Wednesday the Coroners’ Office (within the Ministry of Justice) released a report on the deaths of Cru and Chris Kahui – twin babies murdered in 2006.  The investigating coroner, Gary Evans, reported that “the traumatic brain injuries which led to the deaths of Chris and Cru Kahui were incurred whilst they were in the sole custody, care and control of their father Chris Kahui”.  In 2008 Chris Kahui was acquitted of murdering the twins.  We are reviewing this document further, and will provide further analysis if appropriate in the coming weeks.
  • This week Hika Group Limited, in association with Vodafone New Zealand, launched ‘Hika Lite’ – a Māori language learning ‘app’ (application) for mobile phones.
  • On Thursday Statistics New Zealand released Te Āhua o Aotearoa: 2012, a Māori language translation of the Statistics New Zealand in Profile: 2012Te Āhua o Aotearoa: 2012, contains an overview of New Zealand’s people, economy, and environment.
  • On Thursday a Tauranga High Court Judge dismissed charges against Elvis Teddy; a Te Whānau ā Apānui fishing boat captain.  Mr Teddy had been charged after protesting at sea against oil exploration in the Raukumara Basin, off the East Coast.  
  • Last week the Aviation, Tourism and Travel Industry Training Organisation (ATTTO) launched ‘Tourism Aotearoa’.  This is a twelve-month (work-based) training programme, which enables tourism operators and employees to gain a base knowledge of Māori customs and history, and how this relates to their work within the tourism sector.  On successful completion, Tourism Aotearoa learners will be awarded the National Certificate in Tourism Māori, level 3.
  • The West Coast District Health Board has specified that Rata Te Awhina Trust is required to improve its services within six months, or risk funding reductions.  Rata Te Awhina is a health and social services provider and a member of Te Waipounamu Whānau Ora Collective.  The Trust receives circa $500,000 per annum from the Health Board, for the delivery of community-based Māori Health services.

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