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Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 19 June 2015 (edition 21/2015)

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 19 June 2015 (edition 21/2015)

  • The submission period for the draft Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill has been extended to Friday 7 August 2015. For further information on the draft bill refer to Pānui edition 18/2015.
  • This week a media outlet reported on a New Zealand Police intervention which refers Māori drivers without a valid licence in the Counties Manukau District to attend training, and gain the correct licence – rather than receive an immediate fine.  If completed successfully no fine is issued.  The purpose of this is to reduce Māori road trauma and offending, in accordance with the Police Turning of the Tide strategy (Pānui 28/2014 refers).   The media outlet suggested this was a race-based policy that benefits only Māori.
  • Ngā Ruahine are considering appealing the Environmental Protection Authority decision to grant a 35-year marine consent to Shell Todd Oil Services to continue running its Maui offshore oil and gas field off the Taranaki coast.
  • Ngāti Ruanui are supporting a petition created by Kiwis Against Seabed Mining (KASM) calling for a moratorium on all seabed mining in New Zealand waters, until a more thorough understanding of the risks and impacts are understood.
  • Last week we advised Dr Lance O’Sullivan was appointed Chairman of Te Whānau o Hato Petera Trust.  This is the Trust that oversees the hostel at Hato Petera College.  Subscribers may recall quality concerns are presenting at this college, Pānui 43/2014 refers.  However this week, the appointment has been ruled to be invalid by the incumbent Chair, Tame Te Rangi, on the grounds that a 5-1 vote in favour of Dr O’Sullivan failed as there was an insufficient quorum.  (The board has twelve positions, but six are presently vacant.)  In response, Dr O’Sullivan is said to be seeking a whānau hui this weekend, to have more members elected to the board, allowing for a further attempt at gaining the chairperson’s role.  Mr Te Rangi, however, has indicated that there is a formal process for calling a special general meeting which must be followed.  In addition, Dr O’Sullivan has indicated there have been incidents of serious student bullying within the hostel, and a matter has been referred to the Police for their consideration.
  • Last Friday the University of Otago published an online research report called Oranga Niho me Ngā Tangata Whaiora: Oral health and Māori Mental Health Patients.  The research studied the effect of rehabilitative dental treatment on mental health, oral health, and quality of life; and found positive improvements with improved care.   The report can be view here: http://www.otago.ac.nz/sjwri/otago110932.pdf

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