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Salient Māori News Items for the period ending 27 July 2018

Salient Māori News Items for the period ending 27 July 2018

  • Dr Pauline Kingi CMNZ (Ngāti Whāwhākia, Ngāti Mahuta, Ngāti Pikiao, Te Arawa, Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Maniapoto) has been appointed the lead for the Government Inquiry into the Appointment Process for A Deputy Commissioner of Police.
  • Steven Tipene Wilson (Ngāti Koroki Kahukura, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāti Tura, Ngāti Te Ngākau) has been appointed deputy chair of the Environmental Protection Agency and Dayle Hunia (Ngāti Awa) has been appointed a Director.
  • Pauline Winter QSO (Te Atiawa Taranaki) and Sir John Clarke CNZM (Ngāti Porou, Ngāpuhi) have been appointed to the recruitment panel for the roles Chief Human Rights Commissioner, Race Relations Commissioner and Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner. Ms Winter will chair the three-person panel.
  • Rukumoana Schaafhausen (Ngāti Haua) has been appointed a Director of the Crown research entity AgResearch.
  • The Minister for Seniors, Tracey Martin, has released a discussion document and opened consultations for a new positive ageing strategy. The document notes the projected growth of Māori aged 65+ years from 43,000 in 2016 to 118,000 by 2036. Submissions and public consultations close 24 August 2018, and a draft strategy and action plan will be released in early 2019.

http://www.superseniors.msd.govt.nz/documents/ageing-population-consultation/ageing-population-discussion-document-web.pdf

  • Applications are now open for the Children and Families Research Fund. The purpose of this fund is to support social policy research evolving from the Growing Up in New Zealand longitudinal study. The Ministry of Social Development manage the fund and will award up to $750,000 in total.  Applications close 31 August.

http://www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/work-programmes/research/children-families-research/children-and-families-research-fund-20182019-funding-round.html

  • Last week the Director General of Health published the Health and Independence 2017 report. This report presents an overview of the health of New Zealanders drawing on a range of sources. In short Māori health continues to be poorer than non – Māori with life expectancy for Māori males born from 2012–2014 being 7.3 years below that of non-Māori males born over the same period. For Māori females in this age group, life expectancy is 6.8 years shorter than non – Māori females.

https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/health-and-independence-report_2017_0.pdf

  • In late June the Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, announced that tertiary level 1 and 2 Te Reo Māori programmes will receive a funding increase of $1,000 per full time equivalent place (EFTS). This means funding will increase from $6,500 to $7,500 per EFTS. Funding changes will take effect in 2019. Quite why Te Reo Māori is funded at $500 less than English as a Second Language was not announced, and is a matter we intend to investigate further in our reviews of tertiary education policy and Government Te Reo Māori strategies.
  • Earlier this month Margaret Dixon was sentenced in the Auckland District Court to 12 months’ home detention and ordered to pay $5,000 in reparation for defrauding the Parengarenga 3G Trust of $935,000. In May Ms Dixon pleaded guilty to three charges of ‘theft by person in special relationship’ under the Crimes Act.
  • Last week Hemo Kerewai Thompson, former finance manager of Raukura Waikato Social Services Trust (RWSS), was sentenced to two years and five months’ imprisonment for 166 charges of ‘theft in a special relationship’. Ms Thompson defrauded RWSS of circa $175,000. The offending took place over a four year period from November 2010 to February 2015. RWSS is currently in liquidation.
  • An inquiry into the appointment of Deputy Commissioner of Police Wallace Haumaha will commence on August 6. The inquiry follows criticism of Mr Haumaha’s appointment from Louise Nicholas, who is an advocate for the rights of women who have been victims of sexual violence. Ms Nicholas believes the appointment was inappropriate as Mr Haumaha had publicly shown support for two former policemen who were accused and convicted of rape in the 1980s. The scope of the inquiry will consider if the process that led to Mr Haumaha’s appointment was adequate.  The inquiry will not consider whether Mr Haumaha is a suitable candidate for the role

http://www.dia.govt.nz/Government-Inquiry-Into-the-Appointment-Process-for-a-Deputy-Commissioner-of-Police.

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