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E15 Salient News Items to 10 May 2019

E15 Salient News Items to 10 May 2019

  • Waitohiariki Quayle (Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa) has been ordained as an Anglican Bishop of Te Upoko o Te Ika o Maui. Archbishop Waitohiariki is the first female in Aotearoa to be ordained as a Bishop.
  • Rachel Taulelei (Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Rarua, Ngāti Koata) has been named a recipient of the Kea World Class New Zealand Award for her contribution to the sustainable food industry and her ongoing work promoting Aotearoa as a world-class producer of food and beverages.
  • Philip Broughton (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed to the NZ on Air board.
  • Last Saturday Ngāti Hinerangi (Matamata) and the Crown signed a Deed of Settlement. The deed provides for financial redress of $8.1 million, the return of 14 sites of cultural significance, a cultural revitalisation fund, and five commercial properties. https://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-hinerangi/
  • On Tuesday the Minister of Justice, Andrew Little, announced details on the Cannabis Referendum, which is to be held with the General Election in 2020. This will help to determine whether personal use of recreational cannabis should be legalised.  Voters will be given the opportunity to answer a simple Yes or No question on the matter, and if the yes vote prevails Parliament will then need to consider enacting legislation to put that into effect.  The provisos are that there will be a minimum purchasing age of 20, there will be regulations to control commercial supply, limited home-growing options, and an educational programme.  We advise the New Zealand Health Survey 2015, indicates up to 25% of Māori adults used cannabis at least once within a twelve-month period (in the years 2013/2014).  In 2018 41% of people convicted of a cannabis offence were Maori.Proactive release – Cabinet paper – 2020 Cannabis Referendum – 7 May 2019.pdf
  • On Wednesday the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill was introduced in Parliament (the Zero Carbon Bill). The Bill, if passed into law, will set a legally binding objective for the Government to seek to limit global warming to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius.   The Bill also sets a target for a 10 per cent reduction in biological methane emissions by 2030 – which will likely impact on all Māori agri-busineses.  An independent Climate Change Commission would also be established via the Bill to provide advice on Government’s five yearly targets. www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_87861/climate-change-response-zero-carbon-amendment-bill
  • The Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment has released discussion papers on the Plant Variety Rights Act 1987 and impacts for Māori. This is because this legislation, is being reviewed, and the Ministry is aware of concerns raised by Māori on plant cultivation, particularly through the WAI 262 claim (sometimes called the Flora and Fauna claim).  Subscribers working in this sector can view the documents here https://www.mbie.govt.nz/document-library/search?keywords=Wai+262&df=01%2F04%2F2019&dt=30%2F04%2F2019&sort=&start=10
  • Last week the Government opened an onshore petroleum block offer tender (i.e. a tender for oil exploration rights in Taranaki). Permit holders are now explicitly required to engage with iwi on an ongoing basis, with specific early engagement requirements in relation to activities to be undertaken within 200 metres of areas of significance to iwi.  Ngāti Ruanui iwi leader, Debbie Ngarewa-Packer, however has noted the 200 metres is less than what had already been established between iwi and oil companies (which is a 500 metre gap).  Other iwi leaders have expressed concern the onshore activity prevents them from undertaking complete land and farm management activities, as they are not sure if and when oil companies will seek to enact any drilling rights they may acquire.
  • The Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden, has announced the establishment of a ‘National New Energy Development centre’ in Taranaki. It’s stated purpose being to ‘help lead New Zealand’s transition to a low carbon future’.   The Government has set aside $27 million for its establishment, and operating funding of $5 million per a

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