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Author: Panui Admin

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 8 February 2019 – Edition 3

  • On Monday former Māori Party co-leader, Marama Fox, was convicted and fined for driving while over the legal blood alcohol level. The incident occurred in November 2018. Ms Fox received a fine and has been disqualified from diving for six months.
  • Otangarei Papakāinga has secured circa $1.13 million of funding (including a $200,000 loan) for insulation and other healthy homes initiatives within the community of   For this project Otangarei Papakāinga have partnered with Te Puni Kōkiri, the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development and Te Hau Awhiowhio o Otangarei Trust.
  • Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa has been awarded investment funding of circa $2.3million for housing initiatives in Tākou Bay, Whaingaroa.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 1 February 2019

  • On Wednesday Michelle Hippolite (Waikato, Rongowhakaata, Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki) announced her resignation as Chief Executive of Te Puni Kōkiri. Ms Hippolite will officially step down in July.
  • John Tamihere (Ngāti Porou, Whakatohea, Tainui) has announced he will stand as a candidate for the 2019 Auckland mayoralty elections. Nominations open July 19 and voting runs from 20 September to 12 October.
  • Applications for the 2019 Sir Āpirana Ngata Memorial Scholarship are open. The scholarship is managed by Te Tumu Paeroa on behalf of the Māori Soldiers Trust. The scholarships are open to all Māori studying at tertiary level polytechnic, wānanga, university or other tertiary institutions – with preference given to descendants of Māori who served overseas during World War I. Each scholarship is valued between $1,000 – $3,000.

Applications close 1 May 2019.

https://d3u195fnb8c781.cloudfront.net/live/media/documents/Sir_Apirana_Ngata_Memorial_Scholarship_Application_2019.pdf

  • Kararaina Cribb has stepped down as the Chief Executive of Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust.

Tāngata Māori in the News (Appointments and Awards of Note) –

  • Traci Houpapa (Tainui) has been appointed a director to the board of New Zealand Trade and Enterprise.
  • Linda Te Puni (Ngāi Tahu – Waihōpai, Te Ātiawa – Te Whiti, Taranaki) has been appointed as the next New Zealand Ambassador to Chile.
  • Terena Wara (Waikato, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga) has been appointed as a Judge of the Māori Land Court.
  • Damian Stone (Ngāti Kahungunu) has been appointed as a Judge of the Māori Land Court.
  • La-Verne King (Ngāti Kahu ki Whangaroa and Ngāti Paoa) has been appointed as a District Court Judge in Northland.
  • Keriana Brooking (Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Kahungunu ki te Wairoa) has been appointed Deputy-Director General Health System Improvement and Innovation, Ministry of Health.
  • John Whaanga (Ngāti Rākaipaaka, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Rongomaiwahine) has been appointed Deputy Director-General Māori Health, Ministry of Health.
  • The following have been appointed to the Māori advisory group for the Government’s joint venture on family violence and sexual violence:
  • Prue Kapua (Ngāti Whakaue,Te Arawa, Ngāti Kahungunu) Chair;
  • Ruahine (Roni) Albert (Waikato, Ngāti Maniapoto, Tūwharetoa);
  • Ngaropi Cameron (Ngāti Mutunga, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairoa);
  • Ange Chaney (Ngāti Hine);
  • Paora Crawford Moyle (Ngāti Porou);
  • Te Owai Gemmell (Te Whakatōhea, Te Whānau ā Apanui, Ngā Ruahinerangi);
  • Roku Mihinui (Te Arawa, Tuhourangi);
  • Susan Ngawati Osborne (Ngāti Hine);
  • Russell Smith (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Kahu); and
  • Sir Mark Solomon (Ngāi Tahu).
  • Dr Hinurewa Poutu (Ngāti Rangi, Te Āti Haunui a Pāpārangi, Ngāti Maniapoto) has been appointed to the Te Mātāwai Board for a three-year term.
  • Professor Graham Hingangaroa Smith (Ngāti Apa, Ngāti Kahungunu, Te Aitanga a Hauiti,Kāti Māmoe) has been appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor Māori, Massey University.
  • Suzanne Ellison MNZM (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Mamoe, Te Atiawa) has been appointed to the University of Otago Council.
  • Liz Te Amo (Waitaha, Ngāti Moko, Tūhourangi, Tapuika) has been appointed to the Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology Council.
  • Tiwana Tibble has been appointed to the Te Wānanga o Raukawa Council.
  • Maru Nihoniho (Ngāi Tūahuriri) has been named 31st on the Forbes list of the World’s Top 50 Women in Technology 2018. Ms Nihoniho has been recognised for “Bringing Māori Culture to Video Games”.

More Tāngata Māori (Who Have Done Good Mahi) – New Years’ Honours

The following New Zealand Order Honours and Queen’s Service awards were conferred to Māori, or people giving services to Māori, on 31 December 2018 (New Years’ Honours).[1]

KNZM

To be Knight Companions of the said Order: 

Mr (Kim) Robert Kinsela Workman (Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa, Rangitāne) QSO – for services to prisoner welfare and the justice sector.

Mr Robert Arnold McLeod (Ngāti Porou) for services to business and Māori. 

ONZM

To be Officers of the said Order:

Mr Rore Stafford (Ngāti Rārua, Kinohaku, Ngāti Tama, Ngāti Maniapoto) for services to Māori.

CNZM
To be Companions of the New Zealand Order of Merit:

Ms Carmel Miringi Fisher – For services to business.

Mr Owen Thomas Mapp (Ngāti Pākehā) – for services to Māori carving and bone art.

MNZM

To be Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit:

Ms Laurie Tamati Ngarue Sadler Keung (Laurie Wharemate-Keung) – for services to children.

Mrs Wana Joelle King (Ngāti Porou) – for services to squash.

Mr Peter Stevenson Little (Ngāti Pākehā) – services to Māori land development and administration.

Dr Paula Jane Kiri Morris (Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Wai) – for services to literature.

Mr Pouroto Nicholas Hamilton Ngaropo (Te Arawa, Tainui, Takitimu, Ngātokimatawhaoru) JP – for services to Māori and governance.

Professor Barbara Jones (Ngāti Pākehā) – for services to education and sociology research.

Mrs Georgina Salter – for services to netball. Deceased.

Ms Sharon Shea (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Haua, Ngāti Hine, Ngāti Hako) – for services to Māori health and development.

QSO
To be Companions of the Queen’s Service Order:

Mr Colin Archibald MacDonald (Ngāti Pākehā) – For services to the State.

QSM The Queen’s Service Medal

Mr James Frederick Simpson – for services to Fire and Emergency New Zealand and the community.

Mrs Eileen Isobel Whaitiri (Ngāti Mutunga) JP – for services to Māori and the community.

Mr Walter James Walsh (Ngāti Porou, Te Aitanga-A Mahaki) – for services to the community and broadcasting.

[1] Note the following list is of people who received an Honour for Services to Māori.  It is possible / likely there are other Māori we have not identifed who received an Honour in

 

 

 

News summary 14 December 2018 Edition 44

Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill Third Reading Completed

  • On Tuesday the third reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill amends the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness or people in palliative care, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.

Psychoactive Substances (Increasing Penalty for Supply and Distribution) Amendment Bill Committee Stage Completed

  • On Wednesday the Committee stage for the Psychoactive Substances (Increasing Penalty for Supply and Distribution) Amendment Bill was completed. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Psychoactive Substances Act 2015 to increase the penalty for selling or supplying psychoactive substances that are not approved products. Critics of this bill believe that increasing penalties will only serve to increase the size of the prison population, and a holistic approach is required if drug use and the associated harm is to be reduced.  We advise in 2016 Māori received 42% of all drug convictions, therefore increasing the maximum prison sentence is likely to impact Māori individuals and whānau disproportionally.

Education

  • Last Friday the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce published a report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini. Pānui will review this report early in 2019.

Wellbeing

  • On Monday the sixth annual ‘Child Poverty Monitor Technical Report’ was released by Otago University. This work is of interest given the large number of tamariki Māori living in poverty – which we calculate to be circa 90,000, based on Ministry of Social Development research (Pānui 37/2018 refers).  Pānui will review this report early in 2019.

Treaty Matters

Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill (No 2) Second Reading Completed

  • Last Thursday the second reading of Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill (No 2)was completed in Parliament and referred to the Māori Select Committee. This bill gives effect to a deed of agreement between the hapū o Ngāti Porou and the Crown in relation to the legal expression, protection, and recognition of mana of their marine and foreshoreareas.

Ngāti Tūwharetoa Claims Settlement Bill Third Reading Completed

  • On Thursday the third reading of the Ngāti Tūwharetoa Claims Settlement Bill was completed. The settlement includes $25 million of commercial redress, and $4 million of cultural redress, including the transfer of 32 sites of significance to the iwi (along with an historic account and Crown apology). A unique feature of this settlement is that there will also be the establishment of the Tongariro Trout Hatchery and Freshwater Ecology Centre Trust, which will be co-managed by Ngāti Tūwharetoa, the Minister of Conservation and the Tongariro National Trout Centre Society. www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-tuwharetoa/
  • On Wednesday Te Puni Kōkiri published a report entitled Section 8I – A report on the progress made in the implementation of recommendations made to the Crown by the Waitangi Tribunal. Pānui will review this report early in 2019.
  • Jenny Lee-Morgan (Waikato, Ngāti Mahuta) has been appointed Professor of Māori Research, Unitec Institute of Technology.
  • Liz Te Amo (Te Arawa – Waitaha, Tūhourangi, Tapuika, Ngāti Moko) has been appointed Chief Executive of Miro Limited Partnership (a berry company owned by a grouping of Māori land trusts).

E43 7 December 2018: Maori News Items

  • Last Saturday the Otamataha Trust received an apology from the New Zealand Church Missionary Society for historical grievances against Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho. By way of background, in 2014 The New Zealand Mission Trust Board (Otamataha) Empowering Act was passed. This Act transferred land in Tauranga and some other property from the New Zealand Mission Trust Board to the Otamataha Trust. The New Zealand Mission Trust Board had held parcels of land in trust since 1896, (land which had previously been acquired by the Anglican Church Mission Society from Māori owners in 1838). The beneficiaries of the Otamataha Trust are the hapū of Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho, and their members (i.e. descendants of the original Māori land owners).
  • On Monday the Court of Appeal in Wellington ruled in favour of the Enterprise Miramar Peninsula Incorporated group and quashed the resource consent granted to the Wellington Company by the Wellington City Council for a major housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay. The Port Nicholson Settlement Trust has been working in partnership with the Wellington Company and part of the development was to be built on the Trust’s land. In August a group of Taranaki Whānui members, called Mau Whenua, protested the proposed development. The group were seeking a public inquiry into deals done between the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust and the Wellington Company.  The group believe the development is not in the best interests of the iwi, and that the trustees may have breached a clause within their trust deed requiring 75% iwi consent for a major transaction.  The Court of Appeal ruling means a new resource consent process is required (and the Court advises the City Council may need to use an independent person for this).  This action will likely please those members of the iwi who are against the development.   We also note the annual accounts for this iwi are not available for public viewing this year.
  • On Tuesday the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill was introduced in Parliament. If passed into law this bill will empower Te Rūnganga o Ngāi Tahu (TRoNT) to appoint up to 2 members to the Canterbury Regional Council, after the 2019 local body elections.
  • This week mainstream media has been reporting on the Nelson Christmas Parade (held last Sunday) which had for the first time a non-traditionally dressed Santa. Instead Santa was Māori, without a beard and dressed in a short-sleeved shirt, and red korowai. The Māori Santa also held a large hei matu (fish hook) designed sceptre. Public opinion on the Māori Santa has been mixed.
  • This week the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council (HBRC) held public consultation regarding a proposal to sell up to 45% of the Port of Napier (currently the port is wholly owned by the Council’s investment company). Local Hawke’s Bay iwi, Ngāti Pahauwera, has noted that given much of the land for the port was taken from Māori under the Napier Harbour Board Act, the iwi seeks access to the shares at a reduced rate from the council.   The regional council (so far) has not expressed interest in negotiating on this matter with Ngāti Pahauwera.
  • Today the report by the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce was published. We will review this report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini in our next edition of Pānui E44 14 December 2018.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 30 November 2018

  • Ruakere Hond (Taranaki, Te Ātiawa), Prue Kapua (Te Arawa) and Kim Ngarimu (Ngāti Porou) have been appointed as members of the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • Te Paea Paringatai (Waikato and Ngāti Porou) has been appointed a member of the Library and Information Advisory Commission.
  • The Ngā Tohu Reo Māori 2018 (National Māori Language Awards 2018) were held last week. The winners were:
    • Iwi Award – Muriwai Jones;
    • Whānau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Rangatahi Award – Māori Television Giphy Channel by Fly;
    • Takitahi Award – Mike Hollings (Ngāti Raukawa and Te Atihaunui-a-Paparangi);
    • Mātauranga Kaupapa Māori Education Award – Taringa Punua Pāoho by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Mātauranga Whānui Education Award – Mahuru Māori – Fortnite by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Kāwanatanga Award – Te Amorangi ki mua, Te Hāpai Ō ki muri by Rotorua Lakes Council
    • Pakihi Award – Te Mātāpuna by Fonterra;
    • Te Mahi Toi, Te Mahi Whakangahau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Ngā Mahi Pāpāho Award – Sky TV, Tiki Towns;
    • Ngā Hapori Māori Award – Dr Te Taku Parai (Ngāti Toa);
    • Aotearoatanga Award – Kōrero Māori by Te Hiku Media;
    • Te Wiki o te Reo Māori Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Huia te Reo Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Oranga Angitu Award – Ahorangi Whatarangi Winiata (Ngāti Raukawa);
    • Ngā Tohu Kairangi: Special Commendations:
      • #1miriona – Te Māngai Pāho
      • Hīkoi Reo Māori Whangārei – Te Kura Taitamawāhine o Whangārei
      • Guyon Espiner – Te Reo Irirangi o Aotearoa
      • Fush Uka – Anton Matthew
      • Te Tauihu – Te Kaunihera o Pōneke.
  • On Saturday 1 December Wakatū Incorporation will hold their annual general meeting in Nelson. A highlight for Wakatū Incorporation this year has been the twenty-year anniversary of Tohu Wines. In 1998, Wakatū Incorporation, in partnership with Rarua Atiawa Iwi Trust and Wi Pere Trust, launched Tohu Wines. Tohu Wines is recognised as He mātāmua taketake – the first Māori-owned and operated wine label in the world. In 2010 Wakatū Incorporation became the sole owners of the brand. At the AGM three board appointments will also be decided.
  • This week the former Minister of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Chris Finlayson, announced his pending retirement from politics, in January 2019. Mr Finlayson oversaw the conclusion of approximately sixty Treaty of Waitangi settlements; and is therefore well known throughout iwi groups in New Zealand.  During his tenure the total dollar quantum of settlements rose from a few hundred million to circa two billion in direct redress.  Although his initial goal of settling all historic claims was not achieved while he was Minister (in particular the settlement with Ngā Puhi reads as the one that got away), Mr Finlayson hastened and streamlined the overall settlement process.  In our view he is without doubt a Parliamentary peer in regards to how much time and effort he placed in resolving outstanding Treaty of Waitangi grievances whilst a Minister of the Crown.
  • Parininihi ki Waitōtara Inc, Te Atiawa Iwi Holdings, and Taranaki Iwi Holding have formed Ngāmotu Hotels Limited Partnership for the purpose of taking ownership of the Novotel New Plymouth. The sale date is set for 1 January 2019, and the price is reportedly $23 million.
  • On Tuesday the Parliamentary Committee stage of the Child Poverty Reduction Bill was completed, and the Bill was divided into two Bills: (i) Child Poverty Reduction Bill; (ii) Children’s Amendment Bill.  This policy area is of importance to Māori, as current Ministry of Social Development research indicates circa 90,000 tamariki Māori live in poorer households / poverty.  The new measures and goals within this proposed legislation will include Māori specific poverty reduction objectives, set in consultation with Māori, based on Treaty principles (Pānui 37/2018 and Pānui 2/2018 refer).
  • On Thursday the second reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.  A Government Supplementary Order Paper (i.e. a means to improve some parts of this Bill) has also now been put forward for consideration at the Parliamentary Committee Stage.  We advise that the Ministry of Health has commenced issuing licenses to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes, and that Māori and community-owned Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been awarded a licence to do so.
  • On Wednesday the Minister of Health, Dr David Clark, announced that he had received the report of the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction – He Ara Oranga: report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction.  The report will likely be made public before the end of 2018 and the Government’s formal response will be published during March 2019.
  • On Wednesday the Māori Television Board announced that its Chief Executive, Keith Ikin, had resigned and will leave the organisation in early 2019. Mr Ikin (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāpuhi, Whanganui) has been with the organisation for 18 months. Deputy Chief Executive Shane Taurima will step into the Acting Chief Executive role until a replacement is appointed.
  • Last week Māori Television announced that its current affairs shows will end production shortly and will be replaced by a single brand in 2019. The current affairs programmes   Kawekōrero, Native Affairs and Rereātea will end in December and the news programme Te Kāea will end in February 2019.
  • Last week the Government released the Early childhood education draft strategic plan 2019-29 “He taonga te tamaiti, Every child a taonga”. Despite the title this document places little emphasis on tamaiti Māori or Māori mediums of learning.

https://conversation.education.govt.nz/conversations/early-learning-strategic-plan/

E41 Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 23 November 2018

  • Tonight the 15th Ngā Tohu Reo Māori, the National Māori Language Awards, will be held at Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. The awards will be hosted by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, the Māori Language Commission.
  • On Monday the Student Loan Scheme 2018 annual report was tabled in Parliament. As at 30 June 2018:
    • 170,037 people took out a student loan during the 2017/18 year: of these 31,287 (18.4%) were Māori;
    • 7,374 (17.5%) of first-time student loan borrowers were Māori;

Overall students used 67% of borrowings to cover course fees. We advise that Wānanga had the lowest average course fees of $3,645 compared with $7,048, $5,009, $7,696 for Universities, Polytechnics and Private Training Establishments respectively.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/192883/Student-Loan-Annual-Report-2018-Full-Report.pdf

  • The Waitangi Tribunal is continuing its inquiry (WAI 2358) into freshwater matters, with a fourth week of hearings set down for next week, starting on Monday (in Wellington). The inquiry is focused on two overarching questions:
    • is the current law in respect of freshwater and freshwater bodies consistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?
    • is the Crown’s freshwater reform package, including completed reforms, proposed reforms, and reform options, consistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Refer Panui 28/2017 for background information.

  • On Monday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, was named on the 2018 BBC list of 100 inspiring and influential women from around the world. Ms Mahuta was listed as number 53 and was recognised as serving in the New Zealand Parliament for 22 years and for being the first female Parliamentarian to have a moko kauae (women’s facial tattoo).
  • On Tuesday the following recipients for the 2019 HRC Māori Health Research Career Development Awards were announced:

Māori Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship

  • Dr Megan Leask, University of Otago (General Fellowship). Reducing the burden of metabolic disease in Māori, $284,600

Māori Health Research PhD Scholarship

  • Sonia Hawkins, University of Auckland. Racial and ethnic bias among registered nurses, $129,000.
  • Marie Jardine, University of Auckland. Deglutition (Swallowing) in advanced age, $75,000.
  • Ngahuia Mita (Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Hako), University of Otago. Tairāwhiti waka, Tairāwhiti tangata – Examining Tairāwhiti voyaging philosophies, $141,000.
  • Emerald Muriwai (Ngāti Ira, Ngāi Tamahaua, Whakatohea), University of Auckland. Nga kaiwhakaako, whakapakari tinana me te hauora hinengaro, $107,000.
  • Marnie Reinfelds, University of Auckland. Ka Ora – Exploring the healing potential of birth, $129,000.
  • Matire Ward (Te Rarawa), Victoria University of Wellington. The impact of micro-environment composition on oocyte developmental competency, $114,00.

Māori Health Research Masters Scholarship

  • Nicola Canter-Burgoyne, Massey University. Māori experience of using CPAP treatment for OSA, $26,600.
  • Abigail Johnson, University of Otago. Physiological changes to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in Parkinsonian rats, $30,200.
  • TeWhaawhai Taki, University of Auckland. Te Tino Rangatiratanga o te Mate Ikura Roro, $25,000.

Māori Health Research Development Grant

  • Dr Isaac Warbrick (Ngāti Te Ata, Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi), University of Auckland. Te Maramataka – Improving oranga through environmental mātauranga, $10,000.

Māori Health Research Summer Studentship

  • Manurereau Te Maunga-A-Rongo Allen, University of Otago..Tane Māori access to and perceptions of primary care, $5000.
  • Zaine Akuhata-Huntington (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāi Tuhoe), University of Otago. Māori rangatahi suicide – informant perspectives on determinants and solutions, $5000.
  • Te Aomarama Anderson, Te Puawai Tapu Trust. Rights-based approaches to Māori health: A Kaupapa Māori review, $5000.
  • Ellie Baxter, University of Otago. Qualitative analysis of Māori patients’ primary health care experiences, $5000.
  • Kathryn Hippolite, University of Otago. Exploring Māori health provider workers’ perspectives of medication challenges, $5000.
  • Rebekah Laurence, Te Puawai Tapu Trust. Māori women and abortion: A kaupapa Māori review, $5000.
  • Esther Pinfold (Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto), University of Otago. Pharmacokinetics of Benzathine Penicillin G in children and young people in NZ, $5000.
  • Maia Tapsell (Te Arawa) University of Otago. An environmental scan of indigenous oral health providers, $5000.

Salient Māori News Items to E 32 21 September 2018

  • Dr Charlotte Severne (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāi Tūhoe) has been appointed as the new Māori Trustee.
  • Meka Whaitiri was fired on Thursday as a Minister of the Crown by Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern. The decision was made after Prime Minister Ardern received a report into an incident that occurred between Ms Whaitiri and one of her staff on August 27. Ms Whaitiri’s portfolios had included Associate Minister for Crown/Māori Relations along with Minister of Customs, Associate Minister of Agriculture, Associate Minister of Forestry and Associate Minister of Local Government.  Ms Whaitiri will remain as the Member of Parliament for Ikaroa Rawhiti.
  • This week a reporter on mainstream radio, Heather du Plessis-Allan, when commenting on Prime Minister Ardern’s visit to Nauru for the Pacific Island Forum, advised listeners that the nation was a “hell hole” and that the Pacific Islands “are nothing but leeches on us”. When challenged about the inappropriateness of this comment, she sought to clarify that she was referring to the Governments of Pacific Islands, not the people.  In our assessment, Ms du Plessis-Allan’s comments about Nauru and its economic exchange with New Zealand is almost certainty factually wrong, given it was New Zealand and Australia that largely consumed the island’s phosphate resources for agricultural production purposes, without sufficient recompense.  e. the amount of a half pence per ton in 1921, being raised to one and a half pence in 1927 does have strong parallels with early purchases of Māori land, and extreme lowball prices being paid for resources due to uneven negotiation frameworks being set into motion.[1]  Unfortunately for Pasifika peoples, however, there is no equivalent of a Waitangi Tribunal for Nauruan people to raise this matter with the New Zealand Government now, nor for others such as Samoan people to raise issues of historic incidents of New Zealand Police brutality, etc.  Given du Plessis-Allan’s comments, then perhaps there should be a parallel Pasifika Commission of Inquiry to address such matters to clarify how New Zealand has used Pasifika Islands for resources, labour, defence, and other purposes.  Moreover, however, along with the ill-formed and offensive comments about other Pasifika nations, we consider Ms du Plessis-Allan also makes an incorrect assumption that New Zealand is not a Pasifika nation in and of itself; i.e. her statement indicates no acknowledgement that Aotearoa is the south edge of Pasifika and that Māori are part of Polynesia.
  • This week celebrations of the Women’s Suffrage Movement have been held, as it is 125 years since New Zealand women won the right to vote – i.e. 19 September 1893. Accordingly, from then Māori women were able to vote for Māori men who were standing for election in one of the four Māori Parliamentary seats, established earlier in 1876.  In 1919 women won the right to stand for Parliament in New Zealand, and the first Māori wahine to attempt to do so was Rehutai Maihi, in 1935.  In 1949, following the death of her husband, Potiki Ratana, Iriaka Ratana became the first Māori woman to succeed at winning a seat in Parliament.  Later, in 1972, Whetu Tirikatene became the first wahine Māori member of Cabinet.  The first wahine Māori Prime Minister is yet to be determined.
  • This week the Government’s tax working group has released an interim report. We are reviewing this for implications for Māori, in particular Māori land tax issues, etc.
  • Ngāi Tahu Tourism has announced that it is adjusting wages to ensure all staff are paid at least the living wage of $20.55 per hour.
  • The Māori Carbon Foundation has selected Donna Awatere Huata as their first Māori Climate Commissioner. The role is designed to facilitate opportunities for Māori to learn about climate change.    Ms Awatere Huata has a controversial past, including being convicted and jailed for fraud in 2005.  (Equally she has a history as a Māori rights activist, a writer,  and as a former Member of Parliament.)
  • On Wednesday the Equal Pay Amendment Bill was introduced in Parliament. The purpose of this bill is to improve the process for raising and progressing pay equity claims, and to eliminate gender discrimination in the areas of remuneration and employment terms and conditions for work done within female dominated jobs. We note this bill should have a positive effect for Māori as wāhine Māori are, collectively, one of the lowest paid groupings within the workforce.

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_80319/equal-pay-amendment-bill

[1] This is the amount the British Phosphate Commissioners paid; the New Zealand Government was a part of this board.

E31 Salient Māori News Summary for the Week Ending 14 September 2018

  • Colleen Neville (Ngāti Maniapoto) and Kauahi Ngapora (Ngāi Tahu, Waikato-Tainui) have been appointed as members of the Tourism New Zealand Board.
  • On Tuesday the second reading of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill was completed in Parliament. This bill seeks to reduce domestic violence through introducing cross agency information sharing provisions, increasing access to risk assessments services, and recording family violence offending more accurately within justice sector agencies. Māori whānau experience higher levels of domestic violence than others (Pānui 23/2014 refers).
  • Next week the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little will hold three public hui with members of Ngāpuhi in Australia. The purpose of the hui is to progress Treaty settlement discussions. It is estimated that circa 25,000 Ngāpuhi live in Australia.
Sydney 22 September 12:00 – 2:00pm Te Wairua Tapu Wharekarakia, Redfern, Sydney
Brisbane 22 September 6:30 – 8:30pm Pullman Brisbane Airport Hotel, Brisbane
Perth 23 September 2:30 – 4:30pm Ken Jackman Hall, Darius Wells Library, Kwinana, Perth

https://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngapuhi/

  • Associate Professor Leonie Pihama (Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Māhanga, Ngā Māhanga a Tairi) has received Endeavour Research Programme funding of circa $2.16 million over 4 years for her study, He Waka Eke Noa: Maori Cultural Frameworks for Violence Prevention and Intervention Research.
  • Dr Farrar Palmer (Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto) has received $250,000 from Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga for her research study which explores mātauranga and tikanga Māori in sporting contexts, Manawa Te Taonga Tuku Iho.
  • On Monday to celebrate Te Wiki Te Reo Māori three newspapers which are published for the Whanganui and South Taranaki communities commenced print with “h” being added to Whanganui. In November 2015 the Local Government Act 2002 was amended to reflect the spelling of the district of Whanganui. The decision recognised that ‘Wanganui’ has no meaning in Te Reo Māori.  It also ensured the district name was consistent with the official names of the river and the town.
  • On Tuesday Te Tumu Paeroa launched Taikura Nuku, a modelling service used to identify the productivity potential of Māori land.
  • On Thursday Trans-Tasman Resources Limited announced they will appeal the High Court decision quashing its consent to mine iron sand offshore from the South Taranaki seabed. Pānui E29/2018 refers.

Salient Māori News Items to 7 September 2018: E30

  • Katrina Bryant and Kiri Parata have respectively been awarded health research grants (from the Health Research Council).  Ms Bryant has been granted $181,000 to develop a ‘Falls prevention exercise programme for Māori’. Ms Parata has been granted $199,000 for her project, ‘Whāia te Manaaki: manaakitanga and hauora for Te Atiawa ki Whakarongotai’.
  • Rachael Tuwhanga (Tainui, Waikato-Maniapoto) has been appointed to the Education New Zealand Board
  • In the lead up to Māori Language Week next week a number of articles relating to the use of Te Reo are presenting within the media, including:
    • Simon Bridges stating that Te Reo should not be compulsory within the education sector;
    • Shane Jones stating that Simon Bridges has no mandate to speak on matters relating to Te Reo, and that he should perhaps learn about Māori policy from Nuk Kōrako;
    • Nuk Kōrako stating that it was the National Government that improved Māori language legislation in 2016 and that the present Government needed to get a move on with its work in this area;
    • Nanaia Mahuta welcoming 300-odd (not released) submissions on the proposed Government strategy noting the diversity of views and indicating the strategy was moving along; and amongst those politics,
    • a call for mainstream broadcasters to be required to pronounce Māori words correctly when on air (i.e. making poor articulation of Te Reo a grounds for complaint under New Zealand broadcasting standards).
  • This week the New Zealand Police confirmed they will not pursue a complaint laid by Graham McCready against Meka Whaitiri, a Minister outside of Cabinet. Mr McCready tried to lay an assault complaint following media reports of an altercation occurring between Ms Whaitiri and a staff member. Ms Whaitiri has presently stood down from her ministerial duties while an investigation is being carried out by Ministerial Services.[1]   Ms Whaitiri is the Member of Parliament for Ikaroa Rawhiti.[2]
  • On Tuesday Wallace Te Ahuru pleaded guilty in the Manukau District Court to two charges of ‘Obtaining by deception’ and seven charges of ‘Using forged documents’ in relation to the Waitangi National Trust. The charges follow an investigation by the Serious Fraud Office. Mr Te Ahuru defrauded the Trust of circa $1.2 million during the time he was employed as the Trust’s Corporate Services Manager (2012 to 2017). Mr Te Ahuru was remanded in custody and will reappear in the Manukau District Court for sentencing on November 30.
  • This week relieving Deputy Commissioner of Police, Andrew Coster, confirmed that two formal complaints have been received by police over alleged bullying by Deputy Commissioner Wally Haumaha.  Mr Haumaha has been the subject of the Government Inquiry into the Appointment Process for a Deputy Commissioner of Police. We also note on Wednesday Mareikura Collier, a former police chaplain, commenced a hunger strike in support of Deputy Police Commissioner Wally Haumaha.
  • On Wednesday the Māori Party announced the resignation of Marama Fox as the co-leader of the party.
  • Four wāhine Māori projects successfully secured funding to celebrate the 125-year anniversary of the New Zealand suffrage movement. The projects are:
    • Mana Wāhine Whakatāne $10,727 (Whakatāne);
    • Pūrākau Hākui $10,000 (Manawātu);
    • Tino Rangatiratanga Wahine $12,500 (Wellington);
    • Taihoa e hoa: Natives be Woke $8,327 (Otago).

[1] Ms Whaitiri’s portfolios include Minister of Customs, Associate Minister of Agriculture, Associate Minister for Crown Māori Relations, Associate Minister of Forestry and Associate Minister of Local Government

[2] It is reported Ms Whaitiri offered to stand down, and that offer was accepted by the Prime Minister – although in reality it seems reasonable to conclude in these circumstances that Ms Whaitiri was or would have been required to stand down anyway during the investigation period.

Maori news for the week ending 31 August 2018

  • Leith Comer (Ngāti Rangitihi, Ngai Tahu, Ngāti Pahuwera, Te Arawa) and Fiona Cassidy (Ngāti Kuri, Te Aupouri, Te Rarawa) have been appointed to the Veterans Advisory Board. Mr Comer will chair the board.
  • Marama Fox, a former Member of Parliament for the Māori Party, had her consultancy company liquidated this week over an unpaid debt, reportedly of circa $30,000 to an ICT company. Associate Judge Ken Johnston of the Wellington High Court made the liquidation order against Marama Fox Consultancy Group Tapui Limited.
  • Applications for the Te Pūtake o te Riri | Wars and Conflicts in New Zealand Fund are now being accepted. Te Pūtake o te Riri is a fund which supports whānau, hapū and iwi to initiate, promote and deliver activities and events that commemorate the New Zealand Land Wars. https://tpk.govt.nz/en/whakamahia/te-putake-o-te-riri-wars-and-conflicts-in-new-zeal
  • Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho – A Māori Cultural and Intellectual Property Issues Conference will be held 16 -18 September in Nelson. For programme details see weblink below.

    https://www.taongatukuiho.com/On Thursday the Minister of Education Chris Hipkins announced that Te Wharekura o Ngāti Rongomai, (Rotorua) will receive $10 million for new buildings.

  • Today the Minister of Education Chris Hipkins announced the cancellation of the integration agreement for Hato Petera College, effective immediately. This decision will come as no surprise to readers.
  • On Tuesday the Associate Minister of Education, Kelvin Davis, announced that a series of over twenty hui are being held across the country to discuss ways to improve Māori education. As these wānanga have commenced the Minister’s release is tardy; but the intent to ensure a wide range of input is received is positive.  We recommend subscribers with an interest in Māori education matters attend; as it is time now for the Government to review its Māori education strategy, Ka Hikitia.  (Note presently the strategy for 2018 onwards contains only three dot-points and is predominately a blank white page.)

    Ministry of Education Māori Education Wānanga

     

    Location

    Date and Time  

    Venue

    Lower Hutt 4 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Lower Hutt Events Centre, Lower Hutt
    Opotiki 5 September 2018

    10:00am – 2:00pm

    Opotiki College, Opotiki
    Masterton 6 September 2018,

    TBA

    Copthorne Hotel, Masterton
    New Plymouth 11 September 2018

    2:00 – 4:00pm

    Quality Hotel, New Plymouth
    Te Kuiti 11 September 2018

    TBA

    Waikato, TBA
    Whangānui 11 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Hawera/ Manawatu- Whangānui, TBA
    Coromandel 12 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Manaia/Coromandel, TBA
    Whangānui 12 September 2018

    2:00 – 4:00pm

    Cooks Gardens, Whangānui
    Whangānui 12 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Cooks Gardens, Whangānui
    Gisborne 13 September 2018

    10:30am – 2:00pm

    Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Gisborne
    Hamilton 13 September 2018

    TBA

    Waikato, TBA
    Ruatoria 14 September 2018

    10:30am – 2:00pm

    Ngata Memorial College, Ruatora
    Palmerston North 14 September 2018

    2:00pm – 4:00pm

    Distinction Hotel, Palmerston North
    Palmerston North 14 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Distinction Hotel, Palmerston North
    Whangārei 17 September 2018

    12:00 – 4:00pm

    ASB Stadium, Whangārei
    Kaitaia 18 September 2018

    10:00am – 2:00pm

    Te Ahu Centre, Kaitaia, Northland
    Keri Keri 19 September 2018

    10:00am – 2:00pm

    Turners Centre, Keri Keri, Northland
    Auckland 22 September 2018

    TBA

    Alexandra Park, Auckland
    South Auckland 24 September 2018

    TBA

    Vodafone Events Centre, South Auckland
    North Auckland 25 September 2018

    TBA

    North Shore Stadium, North Auckland
    Hastings 27 September 2018

    4:30 – 8:30pm

    Heretaunga Taiwhenua, Hastings
    Southland 9 October 2018

    TBA

    Southland, TBA
    Chatham Island 10 October 2018

    TBA

    Chatham Island, TBA

     

     

Parliamentary Matters E29 31 August 2018

  • Yesterday Meka Whaitiri, a Minister outside of Cabinet, was stood down from her ministerial duties while an investigation is carried out into a staffing matter. There are media reports of an altercation occurring, allegedly leading to a person being pushed out a door.  The investigation is being undertaken by Ministerial Services.   Ms Whaitiri’s portfolios include Minister of Customs, Associate Minister of Agriculture, Associate Minister for Crown Māori Relations, Associate Minister of Forestry and Associate Minister of Local Government.  Ms Whaitiri is the Member of Parliament for Ikaroa Rawhiti.[1]

[1] It is reported Ms Whaitiri offered to stand down, and that offer was accepted by the Prime Minister – although in reality it seems reasonable to conclude in these circumstances that Ms Whaitiri was or would have been required to stand down anyway during the investigation period.

Te Waihora co-governance partnership – E29 31 August 2018

The Department of Conservation has now joined a co-governance partnership with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu for the care of Te Waihora / Lake Ellesmere. (Other existing co-governors are Environment Canterbury, Selwyn District Council and the Christchurch City Council.)  The Department administers parcels of land around the lake, and has responsibilities for the care of inanga (whitebait) in the lake.  Te Waihora is presently badly polluted from nutrient run off from surrounding lands.  Subscribers may recall that our Budget reviews show this Department has consistently under-delivered on its Māori-focused initiatives – i.e. exceedingly sluggish with its actions and no clear results to report – so it’s more active involvement here on a matter of particular importance to Ngāi Tahu is a positive development (even if they should have joined long ago). Pānui 19/2018 refers.

Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd – E29 31 August 2018

Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been issued a license by the Ministry of Health to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes. This is a Ruatoria-based company which has community and corporate shareholdings and investment; meaning if this business is successful then a proportion of profits will ultimately be returned to the Hikurangi Huataukina Trust (which supports communities between Waipiro Bay and Rangitukia.[1])   Note the Government presently has legislation before Parliament which proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, to allow for some uses of medicinal cannabis.  Hikurangi Cannabis will need this amendment to pass into law before they can commence sales (Pānui 2/2018 refers).

[1] Plus other areas on the East Coast.