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Author: Panui Admin

Māori Media Items of Interest week ending 29 March 2019

  • On Tuesday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, announced that the Lemuel Te Urupu Whānau Trust of Raupunga will receive investment funding of $1.2 million to construct five papakāinga houses.
  • This week hearings for the Wai 2660 Marine and Coastal Area Act  Inquiry were held in Wellington. This Inquiry addresses two main questions:
    • To what extent, if at all, are the MACA Act and Crown policy and practice inconsistent with the Treaty in protecting the ability of Māori holders of customary marine and coastal area rights to assert and exercise those rights? And;
    • Do the procedural arrangements and resources provided by the Crown under the MACA Act prejudicially affect Māori holders of customary marine and coastal area rights in Treaty terms when they seek recognition of their rights?
  • Ngāi Tahu Property, Queenstown Lakes District Council and KiwiBuild have partnered to build a community of 300+ homes in Queenstown. The first homes are expected to be completed in 2022.
  • On Thursday the Hastings District Council (HDC) voted ten to four in favour of appointing non-elected members of its Māori Joint Committee to the council’s other standing committees. The appointees will have full voting rights.
  • Kristy Maria Roa, (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura), Tumoanakotore-i-Whakairioratia Harrison-Boyd, (Ngati Porou) and Taane-nui-a-Rangi Rotoatara Hubbard (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Pahauwera, Tainui, Ngāti Pakapaka, Ngāi Tahu, Ngāi Tūhoe) have been named finalist for the 2019 Ahuwhenua Young Māori Farmer Award. The winner will be announced on 24 May.

Kia tau te rangimarie ki a tātau.

Kia tau te rangimārie ki a tātau.
Koinei te whakataukī nui a te iwi Iharama ka tīkina nei hei kupu whakamihi ki a rātau kua riro nei i a aituā, ki ō rātau whānau e pani nei, ki a tātau katoa e mōteatea nei ki a rātau, ki a tātau tonu. Kātahi nei te parekura nui, nā te ngākau kino. Ka tangi nei ki a rātau mā, ka tangi hoki ki te nui o te aroha kua puta i ngā rangi nei. E tika ana te kōrero kia utua te kino ki te pai. Kia kaha tātau katoa ki te tautoko i ngā pouwaru, i ngā pani, i ngā rawakore e taimaha nei i te kaha o te pōuri me te ohorere. Kei te roa te huarahi ki mua i a rātau hei ngā wiki, hei ngā marama, hei ngā tau e haere ake nei. Me hīkoi ngātahi tātau i tēnei huarahi. Ko rātau tātau, ko tātau tātau.

Tēnei hoki ka mihi ki ngā pirihimana, ki ngā āpiha waka tūroro, ki ngā tākuta me ngā nēhi e whakapau nei i ō rātau kaha ki te āwhina i a tātau.

Hei whakamutu atu, tēnei hoki ka mihi ki a Ngāi Tahu kua tuwhera nei te kokonga ngākau me te kokonga whare ki ngā whānau e pani nei, kei te tautoko hoki i te hapori whānui; ka mihi anō hoki ki ngā iwi me ngā whakahaere Māori, puta noa i te motu, mō rātau e aroha nei, e tautoko nei I a tātau tonu.

Ko te waiata, ko te whiti tuatahi o E Pari Rā, nā Paraire Tōmoana i tito:

 E pari rā, ngā tai ki te akau

E hotu rā ko taku manawa

Auē, me tangi noa ahau i muri nei

Te iwi ē, he ngākau tangi noa.

 

Kia tau te rangimarie ki a tātau.

Peace be unto us.

This is a traditional Muslim greeting that we have adopted to acknowledge members of our Muslim community who were killed last week, their grieving families and all of us who mourn our people.

In the wake of this national tragedy, caused by evil, we grieve for the people we have lost, and we recognise the outpouring of love over recent days.  We grieve for all of our Aotearoa Muslim community; which numbers over 45,000, including over 1,000 Māori.   We grieve for Aotearoa.

The dictum holds true that we should respond to evil with love. Let us all support the bereaved, the orphaned and the poor who carry this heavy burden of grief and shock. There is a long path in front of them over the coming weeks, months and years. We should walk together with them along this path. They are us, we are us. Ko tātau tātau.

It is also appropriate to acknowledge the Police, Ambulance Officers, Doctors and Nurses who continue to focus on supporting the people most affected.
We also acknowledge Ngāi Tahu for opening their whare to whānau pani, and for their wider community awhi; and to other iwi and Māori organisations across the motu for their aroha and tautoko at this time.

Peace be unto us.

There are no other parliamentary matters of note this week.  All business was rightly deferred.  On Tuesday when the House of Representatives opened leaders of all political parties formally condemned the attacks, and then Parliament was immediately adjourned for mourning.  Hansard documents record the remarks of our Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden on this matter, which says it all:

“The 15th of March will now be forever a day etched in our collective memories. On a quiet Friday afternoon, a man stormed into a place of peaceful worship and took away the lives of 50 people. That quiet Friday afternoon has become our darkest of days. But for the families, it was more than that. It was the day that the simple act of prayer, of practicing their Muslim faith and religion, led to the loss of their loved ones’ lives. Those loved ones were brothers, daughters, fathers, and children. They were New Zealanders. They are us. And because they are us, we, as a nation, we mourn them.”

Pānui will resume next week.
Kia tau te rangimārie ki a tātau,

Nā, te rōpū Pānui.

 

E8 Salient Māori News Items for the week to 15 March 2019

  • Te Kōwhatu Tū Moana Trust has entered into an agreement with the New Plymouth District Council, signalling their shared intent to work together within the Waitara community. This precedes the New Plymouth District Council (Waitara Lands) Act, which comes into effect on Sunday, creating new provisions for the sale of Waitara endowment land.  (Pānui 44/2018 refers.)
  • On Monday the Secretary to the Treasury, Gabriel Makhlouf, announced The Treasury’s new Te Reo name is now ‘Te Tai Ōhanga’. This reflects the wider focus on wellbeing that Treasury now has.
  • This week closing submissions for stage one of the Waitangi Tribunal, ‘Māori Health Services and Outcomes Inquiry’, were presented.  This inquiry (WAI 2475) is one of the Tribunal’s major kaupapa inquires, meaning it is considered of national significance and impacts widely on Māori.
  • The 2019 Māori Fisheries Conference will take place on Wednesday 27 March, at the Novotel Hotel Auckland International Airport. The conference theme is ‘Te hā o Tangaroa kia ora ai tāua’- the breath of Tangaroa sustains us.

https://www.teohu.conference.maori.nz/
Parliamentary Matters

  • This week in Parliament Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden, expressed her continued confidence in two New Zealand First Cabinet ministers, namely the Minister for Regional Economic Development, Shane Jones, (Te Aupōuri, Ngāi Takoto) and Minister of Defence and Minister for Veteran Affairs, Ron Marks, (Ngāti Kahungunu). Both have been accused by opposition parties of separately misusing their Ministerial warrants in one way or another.
  • Last week the Māori Affairs Committee has reported back to Parliament on the Ngāti Rangi Claims Settlement Bill – they recommend it be passed, with some amendments. This week the Bill completed its second Parliamentary reading.
  • On Wednesday Green Party Co-leader, Marama Davis, received the Petition from the Save Our Unique Landscape (SOUL) campaign. The group is against a housing development going ahead at Ihumātao (Mangare), because they consider it is their traditional land that contains historic urupa.   Marama Davis has advised she has written to the Prime Minister asking for the development to be halted.

[1] The data is from the period 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2016.  We have used the present tense as it is the most up to-date research in this area, and there is no indication anything as changed.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 8 March 2019

  • The Māori Affairs Select Committee has determined to hold an inquiry into Māori health. The terms of reference are not yet available.  The issue that is somewhat perplexing is why the Committee has chosen to do this now, when the Waitangi Tribunal is already well underway with its own inquiry into the health sector, and services for Māori: namely WAI 2575; the Health Services and Outcomes Inquiry (Pānui37/2018 refers).
  • Eight inaugural forestry scholarships (Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau) have been awarded to allow young Māori and/or females to enrol in a Bachelor of Forestry Science or Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) in Forest Engineering. (The rationale being that both Māori and women are under-represented in forestry management.)   The awards were presented by Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden, and Forestry Minister, Shane Jones.  Applications are open for further scholarships.
  • Applications have opened for Hauroa Māori Scholarships 2019. The purpose of the scholarships is to increase participation by Māori in the health and disability workforce, and the scholarships provide financial assistance for people to complete study in health studies: information is here. Apply for the 2019 Hauora Māori Scholarships
  • Professor Jarrod Haar (Ngāti Maniapoto and Ngāti Mahuta) has been reappointed to the Marsden Fund Council.
  • Ngāti Hine Forestry Trust, in partnership with Te Uru Rākau (the Government’s tree planting programme), has commenced an initiative of replanting former forestry land in Manuka, for future honey extraction. The tree replacing is being done by trainees who are being taught forestry skills over a sixteen-week programme.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 1 March 2019

  • Last week the biennial Te Matatini competition was held in Te Whānganui-a-Tara (Wellington). The winners were Ngā Tūmanako.  Te Pikikōtuku o Ngāti Rongomai gained second place, and Te Kapa Haka o Te Whānau a Apanui gained third place.
  • This week Te Puni Kōkiri belatedly released the Cabinet paper associated with the new Government Māori Language Strategy (Pānui 5/2019 refers). In the main the paper confirms Cabinet commitment to the strategy, and we note a couple of points of interest:
    • An implementation plan is being developed: it is linked to a Budget bid this year, with a goal being to get Cabinet support for the operational activities in August. This is good, as the strategy needs resourcing to have any real impact, as per our earlier review comments.
    • The Minister notes there was a campaign against the strategy via the online consultation: ultimately 45% of the 2,000- odd submissions were negative. In our view this reinforces our observation that online consultation alone is an inappropriate means to gather Māori (and other) input – hui should have been held.  We note the same operational error is now occurring for the Māori media review, which has no public hui scheduled. (Pānui 4/2019 refers).
  • On Monday the Wellington District Court imposed fines totalling circa $1.1 million on the Directors of Hawkes Bay Seafoods, the company itself, plus a related company and key staff. The directors were Antonino “Nino” Giovanni D’Esposito, Giancarlo “Joe” Harold D’Esposito and manager Marcus Giuseppe D’Esposito. In addition, the company must pay more than $400,000 for the return of its forfeited vessels.
    By way of background the offending was identified in 2014, and after years of defensive wrangling, the grouping finally pleaded guilty in 2018 to 131 charges for selling unreported catch.   We further advise that the key proprietor of Hawkes Bay Seafoods, Antonio D’Esposito, already had at least 98 fishing convictions – which shows a history of ongoing offending in this sector.  (In 1997, he/his company was also required to pay nearly a million dollars in fines for fishing offences.)
    This present case matters for Māori because Hawkes Bay Seafoods is the inshore fishing quota leasee for Ngāti Kahungunu – i.e. it catches the inshore settlement quota of the iwi (and for some other iwi).   That is, its business is based on a significant Crown / Māori Treaty of Waitangi settlement; and in our view its misuse tarnishes the Treaty settlement process.  Put simply, why should/would the Crown provide ongoing settlement redress via quota if fishing rights allocated to iwi are going to be misused and put fish stocks at risk?
    Further, although the proceedings against this group commenced in 2014,  there were other investigations involving Hawkes Bay Seafoods in 2015 relating to people (staff) involved in a paua and crayfish black market.  However, Ngāti Kahungunu has stoically continued its partnership with this company and never openly condemned Hawkes Bay Seafoods for its illegal fishing practices.  Rather, in 2017 Ngāti Kahungunu extended the partnership with a joint venture in purchasing an off-shore fishing boat in a 50:50 arrangement with Hawkes Bay Seafoods (again to fish the iwi Treaty settlement quota).   In our assessment, despite the seriousness of the fishing offending by Hawkes Bay Seafoods, Ngāti Kahungunu presents as having been undeterred in its business dealings with the company.
    However, following the outcome of this most recent case, Ngāti Kahungunu has now expressed a desire to purchase outright Hawkes Bay Seafoods, and is actively taking steps to achieve that.  That may be a positive outcome for the iwi – and if successful it may mean that Ngāti Kahungunu is fishing its own quota, and then also processing and selling those fish itself (plus employing iwi members along each link in the chain).  However, there is some suggestion in the media that Antonino D’Esposito desires to continue on as a consulting advisor.  If so it is difficult to see the value in that; as given the convictions it is possible further association with him would tarnish the fishing brand (‘Takitimu’) that Ngāti Kahungunu is seeking to establish to recover the situation.
    Note for absolutely clarity there is no suggestion that Ngāti Kahungunu has ever been involved in any type of illegal fishing practices.   The convicted offending discussed herein relates to a company that the iwi has a partnership relationship with.
  • The Government’s Welfare Expert Advisory Group has now reportedly submitted their advice to Government.  We note the terms of reference for this group (set last June) was somewhat vague, with its role being to ‘provide advice to the Government on options that could best give effect to its vision for the future direction of the social welfare system’.  Notwithstanding, the Minister for Social Development, Carmel Sepuloni, has referred to this work as an ‘overhaul of the welfare system’.  Accordingly, we expect the report to have significant implications for Māori, particularly for the 109,000 tangata Māori – and their whānau members – who are reliant on one of the three main benefits.[1]  Minister Sepuloni has indicated the report will be released publicly later this month, or in early April.   We will advise further at that time.
  • Statistics NZ has released its working document on how to measure child poverty; Measuring child poverty: Concepts and definitions’. By way of background, the Government’s Child Poverty Reduction Act was in introduced in 2018 to help reduce child poverty in New Zealand – Pānui 8/2018 outlines this policy shift. The new Act now requires Government to set three-year and ten-year targets on four primary measures, and for the Government Statistician to report annually on ten measures of child poverty.  The working paper sets out the technical approaches to be used.  In addition, three further supporting papers explaining the rationales for statistical and data choices have been released.  We have undertaken a summary review of these papers and found nothing untoward: i.e. the measures being used are appropriate, and present as thoughtfully designed.  Māori child poverty information is expected to be presented through this work as well – which in part is a result of submissions made by Māori for this to be included.  We will advise further once the first data sets are released.  The working documentation is available here:  https://www.stats.govt.nz/methods/measuring-child-poverty-concepts-and-definitions
  • The Labour Party has declined an application from John Tamihere to re-join the party. Mr Tamihere is a former Cabinet Minister, and amongst other portfolios was an Associate Minister of Māori Affairs (2002-2004).  Mr Tamihere advises the Party’s council gave no reason for the decline, and indicates that the process presents as unfair, because there was no discussion on why he was declined, nor is there any right of appeal.  Mr Tamihere has noted that this action is likely to be because he has announced his intention to seek the role of Auckland Mayor in upcoming elections, although previously the Labour Party endorsed the current Mayor, Phil Goff.   (Mr Goff will announce shortly whether he intends to stand for re-election.)   The Labour Party’s constitution allows the Party to only endorse one candidate for the mayoralty – meaning if Mr Tamihere had been accepted as a member he could have sought that endorsement ahead of Mr Goff.
  • Last Friday the Minister of Agriculture, Damien O´Connor, announced the 2019 Ahuwhenua Trophy finalists for Māori sheep and beef farming. The finalists are: Whangara Farms (Gisborne); Te Awahohonu Forest Trust / Gwavas Station (Hawkes Bay); and Kiriroa Station (Gisborne).  The winner will be announced on 24 May at the 2019 Ahuwhenua Awards ceremony, to be held in Gisborne.
  • Last Friday the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Andrew Little, announced the Crown’s response to the voting results for the Whakatōhea Settlement Process. In our view the response is essentially to proceed slowly with caution, and to check with officials whether any negotiations can carry on safely and or appropriately now; possibly concurrently with a Waitangi Tribunal hearing.
    By way of background, the mandate of Whakatōhea Pre-settlement Claims Trust to settle historic claims was tested via urgent Waitangi Tribunal hearing claims in 2017.  The Tribunal’s primary finding was that the Crown prioritised its objective of concluding Treaty settlements over a process that was fair to Whakatōhea. The Tribunal found the decision to recognise the Pre-settlement Trust mandate was therefore not fair, reasonable, or made in good faith, and breaches the Treaty principle of partnership.
    To resolve this, in October 2018 Whakatōhea iwi members were asked to vote on the following: 1) continuing with the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claim Trust as their treaty settlement entity; 2a) stop current Treaty negotiations in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start?  And 2b) stop current Treaty negotiations in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea?
    The results that came out in November 2018 show a small majority (56%) of iwi voted to continue negotiations with the Crown via the existing entity, but conversely a large majority (73%) voted to also stop negotiations until the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry.  It is this somewhat contradictory outcome that Minister Little is seeking to address i.e. carrying on working with the current settlement entity, but not getting ahead / or out of step with Tribunal processes that iwi members have stated they desire to occur first.

 

[1] Namely, jobseeker support (i.e. unemployment), sole parent support, and supported living.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 22 February 2019

 

  • Last Friday the Minister for Land Information, Eugenie Sage, announced her decision that Tūranganui-a-Kiwa / Poverty Bay was now the official name for what was formally called – in legal contexts – Poverty Bay.
  • Last week the Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson, with the Minister of Conservation, Eugenie Sage, announced the launch of ‘Ka Hao te Rangatahi’. This is a new training programme based in Ruatoria, focused on developing conservation skills and erosion management for youth who are not in employment, education or training.
  • A Waitangi Tribunal hearing commenced this week concerning Wai 2573, which is ‘the Mana Ahuriri Deed of Settlement (Ngāti Pārau) claim’. Ngāti Pārau claimants are challenging the mandate of the Mana Ahuriri post settlement governance entity, on the basis that due processes were not followed in the enacting of this settlement.
  • Last Friday Ngāti Paoa negotiators signed the Hauraki Collective deed of settlement – despite opposition from within the Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust. This means six of the twelve Hauraki iwi have now agreed to the collective deed of settlement. (The Pare Hauraki Collective redress includes a settlement worth circa $250 million in total, the return of two Maunga Moehau and Te Aroha, along with 25,000 hectares of commercial forests. The collective consists of twelve Hauraki iwi: Hako; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki; Ngāti Hei; Ngāti Maru; Ngāti Paoa; Ngāti Porou ki Hauraki; Ngāti Pūkenga; Ngāti Rāhiri Tumutumu; Ngāti Tamaterā; Ngāti Tara Tokanui; Ngaati Whanaunga; and Te Patukirikiri.    There has been significant opposition to various aspects of this broader settlement process, including from Ngāi Te Rangi iwi members who are opposed to Hauraki iwi being represented on a Tauranga Moana governance group, and from Ngāti Whātua who opposed Ngāti Paoa being offered property in central Auckland.)

Pānui Summary E5 22 February 2019

While the big national policy matter this week is tax reform, in Māori policy the heavy-weight items that landed were the Whānau Ora review and separately the finalised Maihi Karauna (Crown Māori Language Strategy).

The Crown’s long overdue Māori language strategy was finally released on Thursday at Te Matatini by Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden. Our review of this strategy is provided on page 2 (access subscriber only).  Using our standard assessment rubric we consider it of marginal quality in that is reads as partially effective in issue and goal identification, but does have some gaps in analytics.  Most prominently, this strategy is not about new, deep water navigation: it’s a ‘keep it steady, and stay close to shore’ approach for Te Reo revitalisation.  We advise more than that is needed, and note despite the various goal and outcome statements, no new investment to achieve anything different is attached.

The Whānau Ora review was commissioned in May last year. The result is this 100+ page report which essentially reaches the view that, despite there not being enough time yet to be assured of the durability of outcomes, overall Whānau Ora works as it should; and therefore Government ought to gear up to establish more commissioning agencies, and provide more funding to the initiative.  Issues around service fit (i.e. dealing with crisis matters rather than being focused on enabling whānau), and deficiencies in State sector support are saliently noted. Our fuller review is provided from page 6 (access subscriber only), with our overall conclusion being that it’s a good report, but still needs policy work to really address the questions that prompted a review in the first place.    That is, the report is a positive service performance review, but is not a reflective review of overall service design.

As noted, tax is the main economic issue being discussed this week; with the release of the second and final report of the Government’s Tax Working Group. There is much discussion on the rights and wrongs of capital gains tax by political and media commenters, and this issue has a whole second volume report attached.  In the main report, however, there is clear consideration of Māori worldviews, and a considered view on the taxation of Māori land is given.  Retaining and improving the current Māori land tax regime – 17.5% on returns – is recommended.  Further, resolving Māori rights and interests in freshwater is seen as a prerequisite step for any water tax too.   Our review covers these matters, refer to page 9. (access subscriber only)

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 8 February 2019 – Edition 3

  • On Monday former Māori Party co-leader, Marama Fox, was convicted and fined for driving while over the legal blood alcohol level. The incident occurred in November 2018. Ms Fox received a fine and has been disqualified from diving for six months.
  • Otangarei Papakāinga has secured circa $1.13 million of funding (including a $200,000 loan) for insulation and other healthy homes initiatives within the community of   For this project Otangarei Papakāinga have partnered with Te Puni Kōkiri, the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development and Te Hau Awhiowhio o Otangarei Trust.
  • Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa has been awarded investment funding of circa $2.3million for housing initiatives in Tākou Bay, Whaingaroa.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 1 February 2019

  • On Wednesday Michelle Hippolite (Waikato, Rongowhakaata, Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki) announced her resignation as Chief Executive of Te Puni Kōkiri. Ms Hippolite will officially step down in July.
  • John Tamihere (Ngāti Porou, Whakatohea, Tainui) has announced he will stand as a candidate for the 2019 Auckland mayoralty elections. Nominations open July 19 and voting runs from 20 September to 12 October.
  • Applications for the 2019 Sir Āpirana Ngata Memorial Scholarship are open. The scholarship is managed by Te Tumu Paeroa on behalf of the Māori Soldiers Trust. The scholarships are open to all Māori studying at tertiary level polytechnic, wānanga, university or other tertiary institutions – with preference given to descendants of Māori who served overseas during World War I. Each scholarship is valued between $1,000 – $3,000.

Applications close 1 May 2019.

https://d3u195fnb8c781.cloudfront.net/live/media/documents/Sir_Apirana_Ngata_Memorial_Scholarship_Application_2019.pdf

  • Kararaina Cribb has stepped down as the Chief Executive of Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust.

Tāngata Māori in the News (Appointments and Awards of Note) –

  • Traci Houpapa (Tainui) has been appointed a director to the board of New Zealand Trade and Enterprise.
  • Linda Te Puni (Ngāi Tahu – Waihōpai, Te Ātiawa – Te Whiti, Taranaki) has been appointed as the next New Zealand Ambassador to Chile.
  • Terena Wara (Waikato, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga) has been appointed as a Judge of the Māori Land Court.
  • Damian Stone (Ngāti Kahungunu) has been appointed as a Judge of the Māori Land Court.
  • La-Verne King (Ngāti Kahu ki Whangaroa and Ngāti Paoa) has been appointed as a District Court Judge in Northland.
  • Keriana Brooking (Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Kahungunu ki te Wairoa) has been appointed Deputy-Director General Health System Improvement and Innovation, Ministry of Health.
  • John Whaanga (Ngāti Rākaipaaka, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Rongomaiwahine) has been appointed Deputy Director-General Māori Health, Ministry of Health.
  • The following have been appointed to the Māori advisory group for the Government’s joint venture on family violence and sexual violence:
  • Prue Kapua (Ngāti Whakaue,Te Arawa, Ngāti Kahungunu) Chair;
  • Ruahine (Roni) Albert (Waikato, Ngāti Maniapoto, Tūwharetoa);
  • Ngaropi Cameron (Ngāti Mutunga, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairoa);
  • Ange Chaney (Ngāti Hine);
  • Paora Crawford Moyle (Ngāti Porou);
  • Te Owai Gemmell (Te Whakatōhea, Te Whānau ā Apanui, Ngā Ruahinerangi);
  • Roku Mihinui (Te Arawa, Tuhourangi);
  • Susan Ngawati Osborne (Ngāti Hine);
  • Russell Smith (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Kahu); and
  • Sir Mark Solomon (Ngāi Tahu).
  • Dr Hinurewa Poutu (Ngāti Rangi, Te Āti Haunui a Pāpārangi, Ngāti Maniapoto) has been appointed to the Te Mātāwai Board for a three-year term.
  • Professor Graham Hingangaroa Smith (Ngāti Apa, Ngāti Kahungunu, Te Aitanga a Hauiti,Kāti Māmoe) has been appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor Māori, Massey University.
  • Suzanne Ellison MNZM (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Mamoe, Te Atiawa) has been appointed to the University of Otago Council.
  • Liz Te Amo (Waitaha, Ngāti Moko, Tūhourangi, Tapuika) has been appointed to the Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology Council.
  • Tiwana Tibble has been appointed to the Te Wānanga o Raukawa Council.
  • Maru Nihoniho (Ngāi Tūahuriri) has been named 31st on the Forbes list of the World’s Top 50 Women in Technology 2018. Ms Nihoniho has been recognised for “Bringing Māori Culture to Video Games”.

More Tāngata Māori (Who Have Done Good Mahi) – New Years’ Honours

The following New Zealand Order Honours and Queen’s Service awards were conferred to Māori, or people giving services to Māori, on 31 December 2018 (New Years’ Honours).[1]

KNZM

To be Knight Companions of the said Order: 

Mr (Kim) Robert Kinsela Workman (Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa, Rangitāne) QSO – for services to prisoner welfare and the justice sector.

Mr Robert Arnold McLeod (Ngāti Porou) for services to business and Māori. 

ONZM

To be Officers of the said Order:

Mr Rore Stafford (Ngāti Rārua, Kinohaku, Ngāti Tama, Ngāti Maniapoto) for services to Māori.

CNZM
To be Companions of the New Zealand Order of Merit:

Ms Carmel Miringi Fisher – For services to business.

Mr Owen Thomas Mapp (Ngāti Pākehā) – for services to Māori carving and bone art.

MNZM

To be Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit:

Ms Laurie Tamati Ngarue Sadler Keung (Laurie Wharemate-Keung) – for services to children.

Mrs Wana Joelle King (Ngāti Porou) – for services to squash.

Mr Peter Stevenson Little (Ngāti Pākehā) – services to Māori land development and administration.

Dr Paula Jane Kiri Morris (Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Wai) – for services to literature.

Mr Pouroto Nicholas Hamilton Ngaropo (Te Arawa, Tainui, Takitimu, Ngātokimatawhaoru) JP – for services to Māori and governance.

Professor Barbara Jones (Ngāti Pākehā) – for services to education and sociology research.

Mrs Georgina Salter – for services to netball. Deceased.

Ms Sharon Shea (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Haua, Ngāti Hine, Ngāti Hako) – for services to Māori health and development.

QSO
To be Companions of the Queen’s Service Order:

Mr Colin Archibald MacDonald (Ngāti Pākehā) – For services to the State.

QSM The Queen’s Service Medal

Mr James Frederick Simpson – for services to Fire and Emergency New Zealand and the community.

Mrs Eileen Isobel Whaitiri (Ngāti Mutunga) JP – for services to Māori and the community.

Mr Walter James Walsh (Ngāti Porou, Te Aitanga-A Mahaki) – for services to the community and broadcasting.

[1] Note the following list is of people who received an Honour for Services to Māori.  It is possible / likely there are other Māori we have not identifed who received an Honour in

 

 

 

News summary 14 December 2018 Edition 44

Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill Third Reading Completed

  • On Tuesday the third reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill amends the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness or people in palliative care, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.

Psychoactive Substances (Increasing Penalty for Supply and Distribution) Amendment Bill Committee Stage Completed

  • On Wednesday the Committee stage for the Psychoactive Substances (Increasing Penalty for Supply and Distribution) Amendment Bill was completed. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Psychoactive Substances Act 2015 to increase the penalty for selling or supplying psychoactive substances that are not approved products. Critics of this bill believe that increasing penalties will only serve to increase the size of the prison population, and a holistic approach is required if drug use and the associated harm is to be reduced.  We advise in 2016 Māori received 42% of all drug convictions, therefore increasing the maximum prison sentence is likely to impact Māori individuals and whānau disproportionally.

Education

  • Last Friday the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce published a report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini. Pānui will review this report early in 2019.

Wellbeing

  • On Monday the sixth annual ‘Child Poverty Monitor Technical Report’ was released by Otago University. This work is of interest given the large number of tamariki Māori living in poverty – which we calculate to be circa 90,000, based on Ministry of Social Development research (Pānui 37/2018 refers).  Pānui will review this report early in 2019.

Treaty Matters

Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill (No 2) Second Reading Completed

  • Last Thursday the second reading of Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill (No 2)was completed in Parliament and referred to the Māori Select Committee. This bill gives effect to a deed of agreement between the hapū o Ngāti Porou and the Crown in relation to the legal expression, protection, and recognition of mana of their marine and foreshoreareas.

Ngāti Tūwharetoa Claims Settlement Bill Third Reading Completed

  • On Thursday the third reading of the Ngāti Tūwharetoa Claims Settlement Bill was completed. The settlement includes $25 million of commercial redress, and $4 million of cultural redress, including the transfer of 32 sites of significance to the iwi (along with an historic account and Crown apology). A unique feature of this settlement is that there will also be the establishment of the Tongariro Trout Hatchery and Freshwater Ecology Centre Trust, which will be co-managed by Ngāti Tūwharetoa, the Minister of Conservation and the Tongariro National Trout Centre Society. www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-tuwharetoa/
  • On Wednesday Te Puni Kōkiri published a report entitled Section 8I – A report on the progress made in the implementation of recommendations made to the Crown by the Waitangi Tribunal. Pānui will review this report early in 2019.
  • Jenny Lee-Morgan (Waikato, Ngāti Mahuta) has been appointed Professor of Māori Research, Unitec Institute of Technology.
  • Liz Te Amo (Te Arawa – Waitaha, Tūhourangi, Tapuika, Ngāti Moko) has been appointed Chief Executive of Miro Limited Partnership (a berry company owned by a grouping of Māori land trusts).

E43 7 December 2018: Maori News Items

  • Last Saturday the Otamataha Trust received an apology from the New Zealand Church Missionary Society for historical grievances against Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho. By way of background, in 2014 The New Zealand Mission Trust Board (Otamataha) Empowering Act was passed. This Act transferred land in Tauranga and some other property from the New Zealand Mission Trust Board to the Otamataha Trust. The New Zealand Mission Trust Board had held parcels of land in trust since 1896, (land which had previously been acquired by the Anglican Church Mission Society from Māori owners in 1838). The beneficiaries of the Otamataha Trust are the hapū of Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho, and their members (i.e. descendants of the original Māori land owners).
  • On Monday the Court of Appeal in Wellington ruled in favour of the Enterprise Miramar Peninsula Incorporated group and quashed the resource consent granted to the Wellington Company by the Wellington City Council for a major housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay. The Port Nicholson Settlement Trust has been working in partnership with the Wellington Company and part of the development was to be built on the Trust’s land. In August a group of Taranaki Whānui members, called Mau Whenua, protested the proposed development. The group were seeking a public inquiry into deals done between the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust and the Wellington Company.  The group believe the development is not in the best interests of the iwi, and that the trustees may have breached a clause within their trust deed requiring 75% iwi consent for a major transaction.  The Court of Appeal ruling means a new resource consent process is required (and the Court advises the City Council may need to use an independent person for this).  This action will likely please those members of the iwi who are against the development.   We also note the annual accounts for this iwi are not available for public viewing this year.
  • On Tuesday the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill was introduced in Parliament. If passed into law this bill will empower Te Rūnganga o Ngāi Tahu (TRoNT) to appoint up to 2 members to the Canterbury Regional Council, after the 2019 local body elections.
  • This week mainstream media has been reporting on the Nelson Christmas Parade (held last Sunday) which had for the first time a non-traditionally dressed Santa. Instead Santa was Māori, without a beard and dressed in a short-sleeved shirt, and red korowai. The Māori Santa also held a large hei matu (fish hook) designed sceptre. Public opinion on the Māori Santa has been mixed.
  • This week the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council (HBRC) held public consultation regarding a proposal to sell up to 45% of the Port of Napier (currently the port is wholly owned by the Council’s investment company). Local Hawke’s Bay iwi, Ngāti Pahauwera, has noted that given much of the land for the port was taken from Māori under the Napier Harbour Board Act, the iwi seeks access to the shares at a reduced rate from the council.   The regional council (so far) has not expressed interest in negotiating on this matter with Ngāti Pahauwera.
  • Today the report by the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce was published. We will review this report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini in our next edition of Pānui E44 14 December 2018.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 30 November 2018

  • Ruakere Hond (Taranaki, Te Ātiawa), Prue Kapua (Te Arawa) and Kim Ngarimu (Ngāti Porou) have been appointed as members of the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • Te Paea Paringatai (Waikato and Ngāti Porou) has been appointed a member of the Library and Information Advisory Commission.
  • The Ngā Tohu Reo Māori 2018 (National Māori Language Awards 2018) were held last week. The winners were:
    • Iwi Award – Muriwai Jones;
    • Whānau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Rangatahi Award – Māori Television Giphy Channel by Fly;
    • Takitahi Award – Mike Hollings (Ngāti Raukawa and Te Atihaunui-a-Paparangi);
    • Mātauranga Kaupapa Māori Education Award – Taringa Punua Pāoho by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Mātauranga Whānui Education Award – Mahuru Māori – Fortnite by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Kāwanatanga Award – Te Amorangi ki mua, Te Hāpai Ō ki muri by Rotorua Lakes Council
    • Pakihi Award – Te Mātāpuna by Fonterra;
    • Te Mahi Toi, Te Mahi Whakangahau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Ngā Mahi Pāpāho Award – Sky TV, Tiki Towns;
    • Ngā Hapori Māori Award – Dr Te Taku Parai (Ngāti Toa);
    • Aotearoatanga Award – Kōrero Māori by Te Hiku Media;
    • Te Wiki o te Reo Māori Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Huia te Reo Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Oranga Angitu Award – Ahorangi Whatarangi Winiata (Ngāti Raukawa);
    • Ngā Tohu Kairangi: Special Commendations:
      • #1miriona – Te Māngai Pāho
      • Hīkoi Reo Māori Whangārei – Te Kura Taitamawāhine o Whangārei
      • Guyon Espiner – Te Reo Irirangi o Aotearoa
      • Fush Uka – Anton Matthew
      • Te Tauihu – Te Kaunihera o Pōneke.
  • On Saturday 1 December Wakatū Incorporation will hold their annual general meeting in Nelson. A highlight for Wakatū Incorporation this year has been the twenty-year anniversary of Tohu Wines. In 1998, Wakatū Incorporation, in partnership with Rarua Atiawa Iwi Trust and Wi Pere Trust, launched Tohu Wines. Tohu Wines is recognised as He mātāmua taketake – the first Māori-owned and operated wine label in the world. In 2010 Wakatū Incorporation became the sole owners of the brand. At the AGM three board appointments will also be decided.
  • This week the former Minister of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Chris Finlayson, announced his pending retirement from politics, in January 2019. Mr Finlayson oversaw the conclusion of approximately sixty Treaty of Waitangi settlements; and is therefore well known throughout iwi groups in New Zealand.  During his tenure the total dollar quantum of settlements rose from a few hundred million to circa two billion in direct redress.  Although his initial goal of settling all historic claims was not achieved while he was Minister (in particular the settlement with Ngā Puhi reads as the one that got away), Mr Finlayson hastened and streamlined the overall settlement process.  In our view he is without doubt a Parliamentary peer in regards to how much time and effort he placed in resolving outstanding Treaty of Waitangi grievances whilst a Minister of the Crown.
  • Parininihi ki Waitōtara Inc, Te Atiawa Iwi Holdings, and Taranaki Iwi Holding have formed Ngāmotu Hotels Limited Partnership for the purpose of taking ownership of the Novotel New Plymouth. The sale date is set for 1 January 2019, and the price is reportedly $23 million.
  • On Tuesday the Parliamentary Committee stage of the Child Poverty Reduction Bill was completed, and the Bill was divided into two Bills: (i) Child Poverty Reduction Bill; (ii) Children’s Amendment Bill.  This policy area is of importance to Māori, as current Ministry of Social Development research indicates circa 90,000 tamariki Māori live in poorer households / poverty.  The new measures and goals within this proposed legislation will include Māori specific poverty reduction objectives, set in consultation with Māori, based on Treaty principles (Pānui 37/2018 and Pānui 2/2018 refer).
  • On Thursday the second reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.  A Government Supplementary Order Paper (i.e. a means to improve some parts of this Bill) has also now been put forward for consideration at the Parliamentary Committee Stage.  We advise that the Ministry of Health has commenced issuing licenses to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes, and that Māori and community-owned Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been awarded a licence to do so.
  • On Wednesday the Minister of Health, Dr David Clark, announced that he had received the report of the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction – He Ara Oranga: report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction.  The report will likely be made public before the end of 2018 and the Government’s formal response will be published during March 2019.
  • On Wednesday the Māori Television Board announced that its Chief Executive, Keith Ikin, had resigned and will leave the organisation in early 2019. Mr Ikin (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāpuhi, Whanganui) has been with the organisation for 18 months. Deputy Chief Executive Shane Taurima will step into the Acting Chief Executive role until a replacement is appointed.
  • Last week Māori Television announced that its current affairs shows will end production shortly and will be replaced by a single brand in 2019. The current affairs programmes   Kawekōrero, Native Affairs and Rereātea will end in December and the news programme Te Kāea will end in February 2019.
  • Last week the Government released the Early childhood education draft strategic plan 2019-29 “He taonga te tamaiti, Every child a taonga”. Despite the title this document places little emphasis on tamaiti Māori or Māori mediums of learning.

https://conversation.education.govt.nz/conversations/early-learning-strategic-plan/

E41 Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 23 November 2018

  • Tonight the 15th Ngā Tohu Reo Māori, the National Māori Language Awards, will be held at Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. The awards will be hosted by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, the Māori Language Commission.
  • On Monday the Student Loan Scheme 2018 annual report was tabled in Parliament. As at 30 June 2018:
    • 170,037 people took out a student loan during the 2017/18 year: of these 31,287 (18.4%) were Māori;
    • 7,374 (17.5%) of first-time student loan borrowers were Māori;

Overall students used 67% of borrowings to cover course fees. We advise that Wānanga had the lowest average course fees of $3,645 compared with $7,048, $5,009, $7,696 for Universities, Polytechnics and Private Training Establishments respectively.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/192883/Student-Loan-Annual-Report-2018-Full-Report.pdf

  • The Waitangi Tribunal is continuing its inquiry (WAI 2358) into freshwater matters, with a fourth week of hearings set down for next week, starting on Monday (in Wellington). The inquiry is focused on two overarching questions:
    • is the current law in respect of freshwater and freshwater bodies consistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?
    • is the Crown’s freshwater reform package, including completed reforms, proposed reforms, and reform options, consistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Refer Panui 28/2017 for background information.

  • On Monday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, was named on the 2018 BBC list of 100 inspiring and influential women from around the world. Ms Mahuta was listed as number 53 and was recognised as serving in the New Zealand Parliament for 22 years and for being the first female Parliamentarian to have a moko kauae (women’s facial tattoo).
  • On Tuesday the following recipients for the 2019 HRC Māori Health Research Career Development Awards were announced:

Māori Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship

  • Dr Megan Leask, University of Otago (General Fellowship). Reducing the burden of metabolic disease in Māori, $284,600

Māori Health Research PhD Scholarship

  • Sonia Hawkins, University of Auckland. Racial and ethnic bias among registered nurses, $129,000.
  • Marie Jardine, University of Auckland. Deglutition (Swallowing) in advanced age, $75,000.
  • Ngahuia Mita (Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Hako), University of Otago. Tairāwhiti waka, Tairāwhiti tangata – Examining Tairāwhiti voyaging philosophies, $141,000.
  • Emerald Muriwai (Ngāti Ira, Ngāi Tamahaua, Whakatohea), University of Auckland. Nga kaiwhakaako, whakapakari tinana me te hauora hinengaro, $107,000.
  • Marnie Reinfelds, University of Auckland. Ka Ora – Exploring the healing potential of birth, $129,000.
  • Matire Ward (Te Rarawa), Victoria University of Wellington. The impact of micro-environment composition on oocyte developmental competency, $114,00.

Māori Health Research Masters Scholarship

  • Nicola Canter-Burgoyne, Massey University. Māori experience of using CPAP treatment for OSA, $26,600.
  • Abigail Johnson, University of Otago. Physiological changes to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in Parkinsonian rats, $30,200.
  • TeWhaawhai Taki, University of Auckland. Te Tino Rangatiratanga o te Mate Ikura Roro, $25,000.

Māori Health Research Development Grant

  • Dr Isaac Warbrick (Ngāti Te Ata, Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi), University of Auckland. Te Maramataka – Improving oranga through environmental mātauranga, $10,000.

Māori Health Research Summer Studentship

  • Manurereau Te Maunga-A-Rongo Allen, University of Otago..Tane Māori access to and perceptions of primary care, $5000.
  • Zaine Akuhata-Huntington (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāi Tuhoe), University of Otago. Māori rangatahi suicide – informant perspectives on determinants and solutions, $5000.
  • Te Aomarama Anderson, Te Puawai Tapu Trust. Rights-based approaches to Māori health: A Kaupapa Māori review, $5000.
  • Ellie Baxter, University of Otago. Qualitative analysis of Māori patients’ primary health care experiences, $5000.
  • Kathryn Hippolite, University of Otago. Exploring Māori health provider workers’ perspectives of medication challenges, $5000.
  • Rebekah Laurence, Te Puawai Tapu Trust. Māori women and abortion: A kaupapa Māori review, $5000.
  • Esther Pinfold (Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto), University of Otago. Pharmacokinetics of Benzathine Penicillin G in children and young people in NZ, $5000.
  • Maia Tapsell (Te Arawa) University of Otago. An environmental scan of indigenous oral health providers, $5000.