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News summary 14 December 2018 Edition 44

Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill Third Reading Completed

  • On Tuesday the third reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill amends the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness or people in palliative care, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.

Psychoactive Substances (Increasing Penalty for Supply and Distribution) Amendment Bill Committee Stage Completed

  • On Wednesday the Committee stage for the Psychoactive Substances (Increasing Penalty for Supply and Distribution) Amendment Bill was completed. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Psychoactive Substances Act 2015 to increase the penalty for selling or supplying psychoactive substances that are not approved products. Critics of this bill believe that increasing penalties will only serve to increase the size of the prison population, and a holistic approach is required if drug use and the associated harm is to be reduced.  We advise in 2016 Māori received 42% of all drug convictions, therefore increasing the maximum prison sentence is likely to impact Māori individuals and whānau disproportionally.

Education

  • Last Friday the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce published a report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini. Pānui will review this report early in 2019.

Wellbeing

  • On Monday the sixth annual ‘Child Poverty Monitor Technical Report’ was released by Otago University. This work is of interest given the large number of tamariki Māori living in poverty – which we calculate to be circa 90,000, based on Ministry of Social Development research (Pānui 37/2018 refers).  Pānui will review this report early in 2019.

Treaty Matters

Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill (No 2) Second Reading Completed

  • Last Thursday the second reading of Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill (No 2)was completed in Parliament and referred to the Māori Select Committee. This bill gives effect to a deed of agreement between the hapū o Ngāti Porou and the Crown in relation to the legal expression, protection, and recognition of mana of their marine and foreshoreareas.

Ngāti Tūwharetoa Claims Settlement Bill Third Reading Completed

  • On Thursday the third reading of the Ngāti Tūwharetoa Claims Settlement Bill was completed. The settlement includes $25 million of commercial redress, and $4 million of cultural redress, including the transfer of 32 sites of significance to the iwi (along with an historic account and Crown apology). A unique feature of this settlement is that there will also be the establishment of the Tongariro Trout Hatchery and Freshwater Ecology Centre Trust, which will be co-managed by Ngāti Tūwharetoa, the Minister of Conservation and the Tongariro National Trout Centre Society. www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-tuwharetoa/
  • On Wednesday Te Puni Kōkiri published a report entitled Section 8I – A report on the progress made in the implementation of recommendations made to the Crown by the Waitangi Tribunal. Pānui will review this report early in 2019.
  • Jenny Lee-Morgan (Waikato, Ngāti Mahuta) has been appointed Professor of Māori Research, Unitec Institute of Technology.
  • Liz Te Amo (Te Arawa – Waitaha, Tūhourangi, Tapuika, Ngāti Moko) has been appointed Chief Executive of Miro Limited Partnership (a berry company owned by a grouping of Māori land trusts).

E43 7 December 2018: Maori News Items

  • Last Saturday the Otamataha Trust received an apology from the New Zealand Church Missionary Society for historical grievances against Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho. By way of background, in 2014 The New Zealand Mission Trust Board (Otamataha) Empowering Act was passed. This Act transferred land in Tauranga and some other property from the New Zealand Mission Trust Board to the Otamataha Trust. The New Zealand Mission Trust Board had held parcels of land in trust since 1896, (land which had previously been acquired by the Anglican Church Mission Society from Māori owners in 1838). The beneficiaries of the Otamataha Trust are the hapū of Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho, and their members (i.e. descendants of the original Māori land owners).
  • On Monday the Court of Appeal in Wellington ruled in favour of the Enterprise Miramar Peninsula Incorporated group and quashed the resource consent granted to the Wellington Company by the Wellington City Council for a major housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay. The Port Nicholson Settlement Trust has been working in partnership with the Wellington Company and part of the development was to be built on the Trust’s land. In August a group of Taranaki Whānui members, called Mau Whenua, protested the proposed development. The group were seeking a public inquiry into deals done between the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust and the Wellington Company.  The group believe the development is not in the best interests of the iwi, and that the trustees may have breached a clause within their trust deed requiring 75% iwi consent for a major transaction.  The Court of Appeal ruling means a new resource consent process is required (and the Court advises the City Council may need to use an independent person for this).  This action will likely please those members of the iwi who are against the development.   We also note the annual accounts for this iwi are not available for public viewing this year.
  • On Tuesday the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill was introduced in Parliament. If passed into law this bill will empower Te Rūnganga o Ngāi Tahu (TRoNT) to appoint up to 2 members to the Canterbury Regional Council, after the 2019 local body elections.
  • This week mainstream media has been reporting on the Nelson Christmas Parade (held last Sunday) which had for the first time a non-traditionally dressed Santa. Instead Santa was Māori, without a beard and dressed in a short-sleeved shirt, and red korowai. The Māori Santa also held a large hei matu (fish hook) designed sceptre. Public opinion on the Māori Santa has been mixed.
  • This week the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council (HBRC) held public consultation regarding a proposal to sell up to 45% of the Port of Napier (currently the port is wholly owned by the Council’s investment company). Local Hawke’s Bay iwi, Ngāti Pahauwera, has noted that given much of the land for the port was taken from Māori under the Napier Harbour Board Act, the iwi seeks access to the shares at a reduced rate from the council.   The regional council (so far) has not expressed interest in negotiating on this matter with Ngāti Pahauwera.
  • Today the report by the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce was published. We will review this report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini in our next edition of Pānui E44 14 December 2018.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 30 November 2018

  • Ruakere Hond (Taranaki, Te Ātiawa), Prue Kapua (Te Arawa) and Kim Ngarimu (Ngāti Porou) have been appointed as members of the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • Te Paea Paringatai (Waikato and Ngāti Porou) has been appointed a member of the Library and Information Advisory Commission.
  • The Ngā Tohu Reo Māori 2018 (National Māori Language Awards 2018) were held last week. The winners were:
    • Iwi Award – Muriwai Jones;
    • Whānau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Rangatahi Award – Māori Television Giphy Channel by Fly;
    • Takitahi Award – Mike Hollings (Ngāti Raukawa and Te Atihaunui-a-Paparangi);
    • Mātauranga Kaupapa Māori Education Award – Taringa Punua Pāoho by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Mātauranga Whānui Education Award – Mahuru Māori – Fortnite by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Kāwanatanga Award – Te Amorangi ki mua, Te Hāpai Ō ki muri by Rotorua Lakes Council
    • Pakihi Award – Te Mātāpuna by Fonterra;
    • Te Mahi Toi, Te Mahi Whakangahau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Ngā Mahi Pāpāho Award – Sky TV, Tiki Towns;
    • Ngā Hapori Māori Award – Dr Te Taku Parai (Ngāti Toa);
    • Aotearoatanga Award – Kōrero Māori by Te Hiku Media;
    • Te Wiki o te Reo Māori Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Huia te Reo Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Oranga Angitu Award – Ahorangi Whatarangi Winiata (Ngāti Raukawa);
    • Ngā Tohu Kairangi: Special Commendations:
      • #1miriona – Te Māngai Pāho
      • Hīkoi Reo Māori Whangārei – Te Kura Taitamawāhine o Whangārei
      • Guyon Espiner – Te Reo Irirangi o Aotearoa
      • Fush Uka – Anton Matthew
      • Te Tauihu – Te Kaunihera o Pōneke.
  • On Saturday 1 December Wakatū Incorporation will hold their annual general meeting in Nelson. A highlight for Wakatū Incorporation this year has been the twenty-year anniversary of Tohu Wines. In 1998, Wakatū Incorporation, in partnership with Rarua Atiawa Iwi Trust and Wi Pere Trust, launched Tohu Wines. Tohu Wines is recognised as He mātāmua taketake – the first Māori-owned and operated wine label in the world. In 2010 Wakatū Incorporation became the sole owners of the brand. At the AGM three board appointments will also be decided.
  • This week the former Minister of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Chris Finlayson, announced his pending retirement from politics, in January 2019. Mr Finlayson oversaw the conclusion of approximately sixty Treaty of Waitangi settlements; and is therefore well known throughout iwi groups in New Zealand.  During his tenure the total dollar quantum of settlements rose from a few hundred million to circa two billion in direct redress.  Although his initial goal of settling all historic claims was not achieved while he was Minister (in particular the settlement with Ngā Puhi reads as the one that got away), Mr Finlayson hastened and streamlined the overall settlement process.  In our view he is without doubt a Parliamentary peer in regards to how much time and effort he placed in resolving outstanding Treaty of Waitangi grievances whilst a Minister of the Crown.
  • Parininihi ki Waitōtara Inc, Te Atiawa Iwi Holdings, and Taranaki Iwi Holding have formed Ngāmotu Hotels Limited Partnership for the purpose of taking ownership of the Novotel New Plymouth. The sale date is set for 1 January 2019, and the price is reportedly $23 million.
  • On Tuesday the Parliamentary Committee stage of the Child Poverty Reduction Bill was completed, and the Bill was divided into two Bills: (i) Child Poverty Reduction Bill; (ii) Children’s Amendment Bill.  This policy area is of importance to Māori, as current Ministry of Social Development research indicates circa 90,000 tamariki Māori live in poorer households / poverty.  The new measures and goals within this proposed legislation will include Māori specific poverty reduction objectives, set in consultation with Māori, based on Treaty principles (Pānui 37/2018 and Pānui 2/2018 refer).
  • On Thursday the second reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.  A Government Supplementary Order Paper (i.e. a means to improve some parts of this Bill) has also now been put forward for consideration at the Parliamentary Committee Stage.  We advise that the Ministry of Health has commenced issuing licenses to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes, and that Māori and community-owned Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been awarded a licence to do so.
  • On Wednesday the Minister of Health, Dr David Clark, announced that he had received the report of the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction – He Ara Oranga: report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction.  The report will likely be made public before the end of 2018 and the Government’s formal response will be published during March 2019.
  • On Wednesday the Māori Television Board announced that its Chief Executive, Keith Ikin, had resigned and will leave the organisation in early 2019. Mr Ikin (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāpuhi, Whanganui) has been with the organisation for 18 months. Deputy Chief Executive Shane Taurima will step into the Acting Chief Executive role until a replacement is appointed.
  • Last week Māori Television announced that its current affairs shows will end production shortly and will be replaced by a single brand in 2019. The current affairs programmes   Kawekōrero, Native Affairs and Rereātea will end in December and the news programme Te Kāea will end in February 2019.
  • Last week the Government released the Early childhood education draft strategic plan 2019-29 “He taonga te tamaiti, Every child a taonga”. Despite the title this document places little emphasis on tamaiti Māori or Māori mediums of learning.

https://conversation.education.govt.nz/conversations/early-learning-strategic-plan/

E41 Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 23 November 2018

  • Tonight the 15th Ngā Tohu Reo Māori, the National Māori Language Awards, will be held at Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. The awards will be hosted by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, the Māori Language Commission.
  • On Monday the Student Loan Scheme 2018 annual report was tabled in Parliament. As at 30 June 2018:
    • 170,037 people took out a student loan during the 2017/18 year: of these 31,287 (18.4%) were Māori;
    • 7,374 (17.5%) of first-time student loan borrowers were Māori;

Overall students used 67% of borrowings to cover course fees. We advise that Wānanga had the lowest average course fees of $3,645 compared with $7,048, $5,009, $7,696 for Universities, Polytechnics and Private Training Establishments respectively.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/192883/Student-Loan-Annual-Report-2018-Full-Report.pdf

  • The Waitangi Tribunal is continuing its inquiry (WAI 2358) into freshwater matters, with a fourth week of hearings set down for next week, starting on Monday (in Wellington). The inquiry is focused on two overarching questions:
    • is the current law in respect of freshwater and freshwater bodies consistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?
    • is the Crown’s freshwater reform package, including completed reforms, proposed reforms, and reform options, consistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Refer Panui 28/2017 for background information.

  • On Monday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, was named on the 2018 BBC list of 100 inspiring and influential women from around the world. Ms Mahuta was listed as number 53 and was recognised as serving in the New Zealand Parliament for 22 years and for being the first female Parliamentarian to have a moko kauae (women’s facial tattoo).
  • On Tuesday the following recipients for the 2019 HRC Māori Health Research Career Development Awards were announced:

Māori Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship

  • Dr Megan Leask, University of Otago (General Fellowship). Reducing the burden of metabolic disease in Māori, $284,600

Māori Health Research PhD Scholarship

  • Sonia Hawkins, University of Auckland. Racial and ethnic bias among registered nurses, $129,000.
  • Marie Jardine, University of Auckland. Deglutition (Swallowing) in advanced age, $75,000.
  • Ngahuia Mita (Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Hako), University of Otago. Tairāwhiti waka, Tairāwhiti tangata – Examining Tairāwhiti voyaging philosophies, $141,000.
  • Emerald Muriwai (Ngāti Ira, Ngāi Tamahaua, Whakatohea), University of Auckland. Nga kaiwhakaako, whakapakari tinana me te hauora hinengaro, $107,000.
  • Marnie Reinfelds, University of Auckland. Ka Ora – Exploring the healing potential of birth, $129,000.
  • Matire Ward (Te Rarawa), Victoria University of Wellington. The impact of micro-environment composition on oocyte developmental competency, $114,00.

Māori Health Research Masters Scholarship

  • Nicola Canter-Burgoyne, Massey University. Māori experience of using CPAP treatment for OSA, $26,600.
  • Abigail Johnson, University of Otago. Physiological changes to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in Parkinsonian rats, $30,200.
  • TeWhaawhai Taki, University of Auckland. Te Tino Rangatiratanga o te Mate Ikura Roro, $25,000.

Māori Health Research Development Grant

  • Dr Isaac Warbrick (Ngāti Te Ata, Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi), University of Auckland. Te Maramataka – Improving oranga through environmental mātauranga, $10,000.

Māori Health Research Summer Studentship

  • Manurereau Te Maunga-A-Rongo Allen, University of Otago..Tane Māori access to and perceptions of primary care, $5000.
  • Zaine Akuhata-Huntington (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāi Tuhoe), University of Otago. Māori rangatahi suicide – informant perspectives on determinants and solutions, $5000.
  • Te Aomarama Anderson, Te Puawai Tapu Trust. Rights-based approaches to Māori health: A Kaupapa Māori review, $5000.
  • Ellie Baxter, University of Otago. Qualitative analysis of Māori patients’ primary health care experiences, $5000.
  • Kathryn Hippolite, University of Otago. Exploring Māori health provider workers’ perspectives of medication challenges, $5000.
  • Rebekah Laurence, Te Puawai Tapu Trust. Māori women and abortion: A kaupapa Māori review, $5000.
  • Esther Pinfold (Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto), University of Otago. Pharmacokinetics of Benzathine Penicillin G in children and young people in NZ, $5000.
  • Maia Tapsell (Te Arawa) University of Otago. An environmental scan of indigenous oral health providers, $5000.

E40 Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 16 November 2018

  • On Wednesday the Minister of Housing and Urban Development, Phil Twyford, announced that a Māori Housing Unit will be established as part of the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Minister Twyford also announced that Minister Nanaia Mahuta will be appointed as the Associate Minister of Housing and Urban Development – Māori Housing.
  • Te Rūnanga ō Ngāi Tahu has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Oranga Tamariki to work together when Ngāi Tahu children become part of Oranga Tamariki services.
  • Last week the Ministry of Health published data tables for registered fetal and infant deaths in 2015. The data showed that in 2015:
    • 6% (17,781) of all live births were Māori babies;
    • 26% (100) of all fetal deaths were Māori;
    • the Māori fetal death rate was 5.6 per 1,000 live Māori births (the lowest fetal death rate amongst recorded ethnic groups);
    • 7% (87) of all infant deaths were Māori; and
    • the Māori infant death rate was 4.9 per 1,000 live Māori births.
  • https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/fetal-and-infant-deaths-2015

  • This week the media released that Ngāti Hine Forestry destroyed $160,000 of pine seedlings which had been funded by the Government’s regional economic development One Billion Trees project. We advise that despite the initial loss on investment further projects between Ngāti Hine Forestry and Te Uru Rākau (Forestry New Zealand) are ongoing.
  • On Tuesday the declaration of voting results for the Whakatōhea Settlement Process were published. Whakatōhea iwi members were asked to vote on the following three questions:
    • 1. Do you support the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust continuing to negotiate to reach a settlement with the Crown of the historical Treaty claims of Whakatōhea?
    • 2a. Do you wish to see the current Treaty negotiations stopped in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start?
    • 2b. Do you wish to see the current Treaty negotiations stopped in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea?
      Overall, 56% of respondents to question 1. voted to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, 81 percent of respondents to question 2a. voted against stopping  current Treaty negotiations in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start, and 72% of respondents to question 2b. voted in favour of stopping current Treaty negotiations in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea.  How the Whakatōhea Settlement Process is to progress from this point forward is yet to be determined.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 9 November 2018

  • This week the Rātana Movement celebrated its centenary at Rātana Pa. The Rātana movement was founded by Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana on November 8 1918.
  • The fourth round of consultation hui on the proposal to evolve the Ngāpuhi mandate and negotiations structure commence this evening. In total twenty hui will be held including four across Australia. See appendix one for hui details.
  • This week the Marsden Fund awards for 2018 were announced. In total 85 research projects were successful of these the following 13 projects had a Māori focus:
o   Dr RS Phillipps Past Māori social organisation and movement in the North Island, New Zealand
o   Dr CM Greenhalgh Hapū: Women and Pregnancy in Twentieth-century New Zealand
o   Dr AG Harris Whanau Ora With, Against, and Beyond the State
o   Dr KA Paringatai E kore au e ngaro! The enduring legacy of whakapapa
o   Associate Professor AC Wanhalla Te Hau Kāinga: Histories and Legacies of the Māori Home Front, 1939-45
o   Professor M Kawharu A question of identity: how connected are Maori youth to ancestral marae, and does it matter?
o   Dr JW Tuaupiki Te Kāpaukura a Kupe: The Ocean in the Sky – Māori Navigation Knowledge
o   Associate Professor AG Hogg When and why did all the pā arrive? A multidisciplinary investigation into the spatial-temporal role of pā in the development of Māori culture
o   Dr WW Waitoki The embrace of our ancestors: reimagining and recontextualising mātauranga Māori in psychology.
o   Dr NA Hessell Sensitive Negotiations: Indigenous Diplomacy and British Romantic Poetry
o   Dr CI Schipper Navigating a Sea of Bias in the Study of Volcanic Gas Emissions: He Waka Eke Noa
o   Associate Professor J Kidman He Taonga te Wareware?: Remembering and Forgetting Difficult Histories in Aotearoa/ New Zealand
o   Professor JM Cumming Understanding the ‘black box’ of evaluation culture and practice in New Zealand.

 

Appendix One:
Ngāpuhi Mandate and Negotiations Structure Hui

Region Date and Time Location
Whangārei 9 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Whangārei Terenga Parāoa Marae, Morningside, Whangarei
Mangakāhia 10 November, 8.30 – 11am Maungarongo Marae,  Porotī, Northland
Hokianga 10 November, 1.30 – 3.30pm Pākanae Marae, Ōpononi, Northland
Kaikohe 10 November, 5 -7pm Kaikohe & District Memorial RSA, Kaikohe
Whangaroa 11 November, 8.30 -10.30am Whangaroa College, Kaeo
Te Pēwhairangi 11 November, 12 to 2pm Waitangi Copthorne, Waitangi, Bay of Islands.
Tāmaki ki te Tonga 11 November, 6 – 8pm Holiday Inn Auckland Airport, Mangere, Auckland.
Hamilton 12 November, 11am – 1pm Distinction Hamilton Hotel &

Conference Centre, Hamilton.

Tāmaki ki raro 12 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Alexandra Park, Greenlane, Auckland.
Dunedin 12 November, 6 -8pm Te Huka Mātauraka Māori Centre,

University of Otago, Dunedin.

Wellington 13 November, 8.30 – 10.30am Te Wharewaka o Pōneke, Wellington.
Whanganui 13 November, 5.30pm -7.30pm Whanganui Function Centre, The Racecourse, Whanganui.
Invercargill 13 November, 5.30 -7.30pm Corinthian Convention Centre, Invercargill
Christchurch 14 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Crowne Plaza, 764 Colombo Street, Christchurch
Napier 15 November, 11am – 1pm Napier War Memorial and Conference Centre, Napier
Rotorua 15 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Novotel Rotorua Lakeside, Rotorua.
Tūranga (Gisborne) 15 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Emerald Hotel, Gisborne.
Perth 17 November, 3 -5pm Darius Wells Library and Resource Centre, Ken Jackman Hall, Chisham Avenue & Robbos Place, Kwinana Town Centre, Western Australia
Brisbane 18 November, 10:30am -1pm Wynnum Manly Leagues Club, 92 Wondall Rd, Manly Queensland.
Melbourne 18 November, 12 -2pm Dandenong Workers Social Club, 52-70 Wedge Street, Dandenong, Victoria.
Sydney 18 November, 7 -9pm Te Wairua Tapu Whare Karakia, 587 Elizabeth Street, Redfern, New South Wales.

 

E37 Salient Māori News Items to 26 October 2018

  • Rachel Taulelei (Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Rarua, Ngāti Koata) has been appointed to the Prime Minister’s Business Advisory Council.
  • Linda Tuhīwai Smith (Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Porou) has been named the inaugural recipient of the Ngā Pae o Te Māramatanga and Royal Society Te Apārangi, Te Puawaitanga Award. The award is an acknowledgement of Ms Tuhiwai Smith’s contribution to Te Ao Māori and to Māori and Indigenous knowledge.
  • This week the finalist for the inaugural Primary Industries Good Employer Awards were named. Finalist include:
    • Employee Development – Kevin and Kylie Ihaka (Forest Protection Services);
    • Safe And Healthy Work Environments – Kevin Ihaka (Forest Protection Services); Michelle Cherrington (Moana New Zealand);
    • Māori Agribusiness – Miraka; Zac Te Ahuru (Ruapehu Agricultural Developments Ltd); Aaron Kurei (Te Kaha Gold Spraying Limited).
  • Last Wednesday Sir Ngātata Love died, aged 81 years.
  • On Thursday, the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little announced that Ngāpuhi are now ready to vote on the treaty settlement evolved mandate proposal. Details on the voting process will be made available from the following website at 5pm today govt.nz/ngapuhi.

______________

Edition 38, Salient Māori News Items to 2 November 2018

  • Stacey Morrison (Ngāi Tahu, Te Arawa) has been appointed to the Ministerial Advisory Group on Public Media.
  • Martin Enright (Ngāti Pākehā) has been awarded a 2019 Winston Churchill Fellowship. Mr Enright will study targeted procurement policies in organisations in Canada and the United States of America to inform and support Māori economic empowerment in Tāmaki Makaurau and Aotearoa.
  • On Monday Te Whakatōhea Mussels celebrated the expansion of their mussel farm operations by holding a launch for their newest vessel, named Kukutai. The new vessel will help grow Te Whakatōhea Mussels’ existing annual harvest from 1,500 tonnes to up to 6,000 tonnes. The company is also awaiting consent to build an Opōtiki based processing factory. When the factory opens it will create employment opportunities for residents.
  • The Kawerau Putauaki Trust Industrial Development will receive $2 million from the Provincial Growth Fund to develop roading and other infrastructure required to support the regions’ primary industries.
  • This week the Overseas Investment Office approved Chinese company Guangxi Fenglin Wood Industry Group’s application to lease 33 hectares of land and build a wood particle board factory in Kawerau. The land is owned by Putauaki Trust. The factory will create employment for up to 100.
  • Ohia Bentham (Ngāi Te Rangi, Ngāti Pūkenga, Ngāti Ranginui, Te Āti Awa, Ngāti Rārua) has been appointed the Māori Party Vice President (tāne).
  • Ngāi Tahu Property will enter a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Queenstown Lakes District Council to explore development options in the Queenstown CBD.
  • This week the Ministry of Education published an Early Childhood Education Attendance report for 2017. The report showed that overall, 65.5% of children aged 0 to 4 years in New Zealand attended an early childhood education service. For tamariki Māori, 17% attended a Kōhanga reo, 58% attended a teacher lead education and care service, 15% attended kindergarten and 7% attended home-based services.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/188238/Understanding-attendance-results-from-the-2017-Early-Childhood-Education-census-v4.pdf

  • This week applications for the 2019 Te Pūnaha Hihiko: Vision Mātauranga Capability Fund opened. Up to $4 million in funding is available for people and organisations undertaking or planning research which supports the four themes of the Vision Mātauranga Policy:
    • indigenous innovation;
    • taiao (achieving environmental sustainability);
    • hauora/oranga (improving health and social wellbeing); and
    • mātauranga (exploring indigenous knowledge).

Applications close 12 noon, 19 February 2019.

https://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/science-innovation/funding-info-opportunities/investment-funds/vmcf/application-and-assessment-information

  • This week Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) – New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence announced nine research projects of investment:

http://www.maramatanga.ac.nz/projects

E36 19 October 2018: Social Research and Policy Snippets

Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry

The Minister of Health, David Clark, has advised that an extension has been given for the report on the Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry back to Cabinet. It will now be delivered by 30 November.  This is to recognise the 5,500 submissions were received on this topic.  (Note the submissions are considered sensitive and are therefore not available for public purview.)

By way of background, the inquiry is broad in scope, and the terms of reference enable recommendations to be made across all structures within the health and the broader public sector.  The inquiry is chaired by Professor Ron Paterson, and there are two Māori on the panel of six (Sir Mason Durie and Dean Rangihuna). This is a policy area of particular importance to Māori, as Māori are significantly over-represented in mental health service areas, and in suicide statistics. The terms of reference acknowledge this health inequality, and require the panel to consider this matter, and to also work in ways appropriate to Māori, and in accordance with the Treaty of Waitangi.


Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historic Abuse in State Care

The Minister for Internal Affairs, Tracey Martin, has put out a media statement indicating circa 500 people have expressed interest in giving evidence into the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historic Abuse in State Care. Fifteen staff are also apparently working with the Commissioner Sir Anand Satyanand in preparatory stages of the inquiry.

Yet what is missing from the media statement is any word on the appointment of other Royal Commission members – which is odd given this is such a significant inquiry, and it was announced over six months ago. That is, to date Māori input on this matter remains at zero – despite the draft terms of reference stating that, “a key focus of the Inquiry is to understand any differential impacts of abuse in state care for Māori”.  Māori tamariki comprise over half of young people in State care, so the Government needs to appoint people to this Inquiry with a strong understanding of Māori care and abuse specific matters; and the sooner the better in our assessment.


 Criminal Justice Sector Reforms – Further Consultation

The Minister of Justice, Andrew Little, has announced that his advisory group for justice sector reforms will now hold a series of regional public consultation meetings. By way of background, this initiative is called, Hāpai i te Ora Tangata / Safe and Effective Justice, and commenced with a large national conference/hui in August. A key theme of the work programme is addressing and reducing Māori rates of criminal offending and reoffending; and as previously advised the working group has four Māori members: Quentin Hix, Tracey McIntosh, Carwyn Jones, and Julia Amua Whaipooti.  The following two articles highlight new data relevant to this policy initiative.
Justice Sector Reforms Public Consultation Meetings.

Date Time Location Venue
29 October 12:30pm – 3:30 pm Timaru Timaru Council Chambers
30 October 9:00am – 12:00pm Christchurch Aranui Library
5 November 1:00pm – 4:30pm Tauranga TBA
6 November 1:00pm – 4:00pm Whangārei Whangārei Central Library
13 November 1:00pm – 4:00pm Tokoroa Tokoroa Public Library
14 November 9:00am – 1:00pm Te Kuiti Te Kuiti Community Room
15 November TBA New Plymouth TBA
17 November 9:00am – 11:00am Palmerston North Palmerston North City Library

Homicide Victims Data Released

Last month the New Zealand Police published a report entitled Police Statistics on Homicide Victims in New Zealand 2007 – 2016: Summary of Statistics about Victims of Murder, Manslaughter, and Infanticide. The report showed between 2007 and 2016, 223 Māori were victims of homicide, which was 33% of all victims (686 in total).  Māori males comprised 22% (154) of all victims and 69% of the total number of Māori victims.  These statistics are a sad over-representation, given Māori comprise only 15% of the total population.

http://www.police.govt.nz/about-us/publication/homicide-victims-report-2017-and-historic-nz-murder-rate-report-1926-2017


Injury Data Released

Last week Statistics New Zealand released injury data. There are two stand-out areas for Māori: injuries from assaults at 37 per 100,000 people, and injuries from motor vehicle accidents at 67 per 100,000.  Both rates   are significantly higher than for non-Māori.  The overall injury data shows a similar rate of non-fatal but serious injuries (and a lower rate of Māori having falls).[1]

https://www.stats.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Serious-injury-outcome-indicators/Serious-injury-outcome-indicators-2000-17/Download-data/serious-injury-outcome-indicators-2000-17.xlsx

[1] Falls are associated more frequently with elderly citizens and there are fewer Māori elderly than others, i.e. a life expectancy disparity of 7 years.  This fact sheet does not probe such matters.

Salient Māori News Items for the week ending E35, 5 October 2018

 

  • Professor Cindy Kiro (Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Hine) has been appointed Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of Auckland.
  • Ross Wilson (Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed Chair of the WorkSafe New Zealand Board.
  • Karis Knight (Ngāti Porou) has been awarded the New Zealand Psychological Society Karahipi Tumuaki Scholarship. Ms Knight (University of Auckland student) has focused her research on the effect of whakamā (shame or embarrassment) on Māori mental health.
  • Last month the Ministry of Justice published a factsheet on Adult Conviction and Sentencing for the year ending 30 June 2018. In 2017/18 circa 75,500 adults were charged with a crime, and 83% of charges resulted in a conviction. The most salient population disparity is via gender, with 78% of convictions relating to males.  There is also a significant difference between Māori and non-Māori conviction rates, with 41% of all convicted adults being Māori.

https://www.justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/adults-convicted-and-sentenced-data-highlights-june-2018.pdf

  • On Monday Mahuru Youth Remand Service was launched in Kaikohe. The service which will be rolled out across the Taitokerau region is a collaboration between Ngāpuhi Iwi Social Services and Oranga Tamariki.
  • On Monday the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) was launched. The Government’s aspiration is that the agency will help reduce homelessness and improve housing affordability. The agency brings together housing policy, funding and regulatory functions from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, the Ministry of Social Development and The Treasury.  (Housing is a significant issue for Māori with over a third of Housing NZ tenants identifying as Māori, Māori home ownership being 35% and Māori being over-represented within the grouping of families without suitable housing; refer Pānui E24/2018).
  • Last Friday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, advised she has received the report into the investigation into the affairs of the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, had considered the findings and recommendations, and written to the Board to implement the recommendations. What she did not do, however, is address the public interest in this matter by releasing the report, nor advising what the findings and recommendations were.   We consider that unacceptably poor judgement from this Minister, as this Board is a statutory entity established by the Parliament of New Zealand, in receipt of public funds, and supposedly monitored by Te Puni Kōkiri (i.e. it is not a private entity).  Minister Mahuta’s approach goes against the messaging of open and transparent government which we note is being espoused by the Prime Minister.    The investigation followed allegations relating to governance and management concerns, and in particular the 2017 triennial elections of the Board.    Fortunately, however, the Trust Board itself has acted with greater awareness of stewardship duties than the Minister, and has publicly released the report.  Accordingly, we will advise on it further in Pānui edition 36/2018.

[Note: we further advise that voting has opened for members of Whakatōhea iwi to choose to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, or alternatively restart the mandating process. Voting ends 26 October.   Refer Pānui 13/2018 for details.]

  • On Monday the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) released a report entitled Maiea Te Tūruapō, Fulfilling the Vision. The report is based on the OCC’s independent monitoring of Oranga Tamariki policies, practices and services: in particular the current practice of placing young people in large secure residences. This report is particularly important to Māori, given 63% of the circa 5,000 children and young people in State care situations are Māori (circa 3,100).  We will provide a review of this report Pānui E36/2018.

Registrations are now open for the Federation of Māori Authorities Conference, to be held: Friday 2 – Sunday 4 November, Emerald