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E43 7 December 2018: Maori News Items

  • Last Saturday the Otamataha Trust received an apology from the New Zealand Church Missionary Society for historical grievances against Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho. By way of background, in 2014 The New Zealand Mission Trust Board (Otamataha) Empowering Act was passed. This Act transferred land in Tauranga and some other property from the New Zealand Mission Trust Board to the Otamataha Trust. The New Zealand Mission Trust Board had held parcels of land in trust since 1896, (land which had previously been acquired by the Anglican Church Mission Society from Māori owners in 1838). The beneficiaries of the Otamataha Trust are the hapū of Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho, and their members (i.e. descendants of the original Māori land owners).
  • On Monday the Court of Appeal in Wellington ruled in favour of the Enterprise Miramar Peninsula Incorporated group and quashed the resource consent granted to the Wellington Company by the Wellington City Council for a major housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay. The Port Nicholson Settlement Trust has been working in partnership with the Wellington Company and part of the development was to be built on the Trust’s land. In August a group of Taranaki Whānui members, called Mau Whenua, protested the proposed development. The group were seeking a public inquiry into deals done between the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust and the Wellington Company.  The group believe the development is not in the best interests of the iwi, and that the trustees may have breached a clause within their trust deed requiring 75% iwi consent for a major transaction.  The Court of Appeal ruling means a new resource consent process is required (and the Court advises the City Council may need to use an independent person for this).  This action will likely please those members of the iwi who are against the development.   We also note the annual accounts for this iwi are not available for public viewing this year.
  • On Tuesday the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill was introduced in Parliament. If passed into law this bill will empower Te Rūnganga o Ngāi Tahu (TRoNT) to appoint up to 2 members to the Canterbury Regional Council, after the 2019 local body elections.
  • This week mainstream media has been reporting on the Nelson Christmas Parade (held last Sunday) which had for the first time a non-traditionally dressed Santa. Instead Santa was Māori, without a beard and dressed in a short-sleeved shirt, and red korowai. The Māori Santa also held a large hei matu (fish hook) designed sceptre. Public opinion on the Māori Santa has been mixed.
  • This week the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council (HBRC) held public consultation regarding a proposal to sell up to 45% of the Port of Napier (currently the port is wholly owned by the Council’s investment company). Local Hawke’s Bay iwi, Ngāti Pahauwera, has noted that given much of the land for the port was taken from Māori under the Napier Harbour Board Act, the iwi seeks access to the shares at a reduced rate from the council.   The regional council (so far) has not expressed interest in negotiating on this matter with Ngāti Pahauwera.
  • Today the report by the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce was published. We will review this report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini in our next edition of Pānui E44 14 December 2018.

Salient Māori News Items for the week ending E35, 5 October 2018

 

  • Professor Cindy Kiro (Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Hine) has been appointed Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of Auckland.
  • Ross Wilson (Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed Chair of the WorkSafe New Zealand Board.
  • Karis Knight (Ngāti Porou) has been awarded the New Zealand Psychological Society Karahipi Tumuaki Scholarship. Ms Knight (University of Auckland student) has focused her research on the effect of whakamā (shame or embarrassment) on Māori mental health.
  • Last month the Ministry of Justice published a factsheet on Adult Conviction and Sentencing for the year ending 30 June 2018. In 2017/18 circa 75,500 adults were charged with a crime, and 83% of charges resulted in a conviction. The most salient population disparity is via gender, with 78% of convictions relating to males.  There is also a significant difference between Māori and non-Māori conviction rates, with 41% of all convicted adults being Māori.

https://www.justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/adults-convicted-and-sentenced-data-highlights-june-2018.pdf

  • On Monday Mahuru Youth Remand Service was launched in Kaikohe. The service which will be rolled out across the Taitokerau region is a collaboration between Ngāpuhi Iwi Social Services and Oranga Tamariki.
  • On Monday the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) was launched. The Government’s aspiration is that the agency will help reduce homelessness and improve housing affordability. The agency brings together housing policy, funding and regulatory functions from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, the Ministry of Social Development and The Treasury.  (Housing is a significant issue for Māori with over a third of Housing NZ tenants identifying as Māori, Māori home ownership being 35% and Māori being over-represented within the grouping of families without suitable housing; refer Pānui E24/2018).
  • Last Friday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, advised she has received the report into the investigation into the affairs of the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, had considered the findings and recommendations, and written to the Board to implement the recommendations. What she did not do, however, is address the public interest in this matter by releasing the report, nor advising what the findings and recommendations were.   We consider that unacceptably poor judgement from this Minister, as this Board is a statutory entity established by the Parliament of New Zealand, in receipt of public funds, and supposedly monitored by Te Puni Kōkiri (i.e. it is not a private entity).  Minister Mahuta’s approach goes against the messaging of open and transparent government which we note is being espoused by the Prime Minister.    The investigation followed allegations relating to governance and management concerns, and in particular the 2017 triennial elections of the Board.    Fortunately, however, the Trust Board itself has acted with greater awareness of stewardship duties than the Minister, and has publicly released the report.  Accordingly, we will advise on it further in Pānui edition 36/2018.

[Note: we further advise that voting has opened for members of Whakatōhea iwi to choose to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, or alternatively restart the mandating process. Voting ends 26 October.   Refer Pānui 13/2018 for details.]

  • On Monday the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) released a report entitled Maiea Te Tūruapō, Fulfilling the Vision. The report is based on the OCC’s independent monitoring of Oranga Tamariki policies, practices and services: in particular the current practice of placing young people in large secure residences. This report is particularly important to Māori, given 63% of the circa 5,000 children and young people in State care situations are Māori (circa 3,100).  We will provide a review of this report Pānui E36/2018.

Registrations are now open for the Federation of Māori Authorities Conference, to be held: Friday 2 – Sunday 4 November, Emerald

E33 Salient Māori News Items to 28 September 2018

  • On Monday the Crown Minerals (Petroleum) Amendment Bill was introduced in Parliament. This bill amends the Crown Minerals Act 1991 to give effect to the Government’s announcement made in April that the offshore block offers for oil and gas exploration permits will end, effective immediately. The block offer was an annual tender process established by the former National led Government that allowed for oil and gas companies to bid for permits.
    – The Government will continue to honour the 22 active offshore licences, which have permits to explore approximately 100,000 square kilometres of ocean: the final offshore permit will end in 2030
    – Ending offshore oil exploration is a major policy shift for New Zealand and demonstrates action towards the Government’s commitment for a carbon neutral economy by 2050. This included a target for a long-term transition away from fossil fuels and 100% renewable electricity, by 2035. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_80358/crown-minerals-petroleum-amendment-bill
  • On Thursday the third reading of the Electoral (Integrity) Amendment Bill was completed with  63 votes in favour of the bill and 57 against. The purpose of this bill is to prevent a person from remaining in Parliament if they leave the party for which they stood. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_75706/electoral-integrity-amendment-bill
  • Renata Blair (Ngāti Whātua, Tainui) has been selected as a Crown-appointed trustee to the Eden Park Trust Board. The Board is accountable for the financial and strategic management of Eden Park.
  • Sandra Cook (Ngāi Tahu) and Dr Jane Kitson (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Mamoe, Waitaha) have been appointed Guardians of Lakes Manapouri, Monowai and Te Anau. The Guardians’ role is to advise the Minister of Conservation on matters arising from environmental, ecological and social impacts from the power schemes on the three lakes. The Guardians of Lakes Manapouri, Monowai and Te Anau is a statutory body established under the Conservation Act 1987.
  • Robert McGowan, a rongoā Māori expert and promoter of the use of mātauranga Māori in conservation management, has been awarded the Minister of Conservation Loder Cup for outstanding achievements in flora conservation work.
  • Te Ohu Kaimoana group has released its third quarter report for the period 1 April 2018 to 30 June 2018. The report has been published to provide an insight into the work Te Ohu Kaimoana undertakes on behalf of Mandated Iwi Organisations. For the quarter ending 30 June 2018 Te Ohu Kaimoana delivered its services circa $68,000 over budget, however they still expect to distribute a small amount of assets to iwi at end of year.
    https://teohu.maori.nz/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Quarterly-report-June-2018-FINAL-DRAFT-V9.pdf

  • Next Monday voting opens for members of Whakatōhea iwi to choose to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, or alternatively restart the mandating process. Voting ends 26 October. Refer Pānui 13/2018. electionz.com/whakatohea.
  • This week Māori Television staff were advised of a proposed restructure “strategic refresh” which may lead to 19 job losses.
  • This week the Māori Women’s Welfare League National Conference was held in Gisborne.
  • The World Indigenous Business Forum (WIBF) will be held 9 to 11 October 2018 in Rotorua. See http://wibf.ca/about-us/ for registration and programme details.

Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd – E29 31 August 2018

Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been issued a license by the Ministry of Health to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes. This is a Ruatoria-based company which has community and corporate shareholdings and investment; meaning if this business is successful then a proportion of profits will ultimately be returned to the Hikurangi Huataukina Trust (which supports communities between Waipiro Bay and Rangitukia.[1])   Note the Government presently has legislation before Parliament which proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, to allow for some uses of medicinal cannabis.  Hikurangi Cannabis will need this amendment to pass into law before they can commence sales (Pānui 2/2018 refers).

[1] Plus other areas on the East Coast.

E23 6 July 2018 – Quarterly Review for the Period 1 April to 30 June 2018

This quarterly review provides a summary of significant Māori focused social, economic and Treaty policy developments for the period 1 April to 30 June 2018.

Within the quarter we reviewed 12 data set publications, 10 research reports, 8 Government policy / legislative issues. Information summaries are provided within the following appendices.

This quarter there have been three Māori focused policy items of salient note:

  • Budget 2018/19 reduced specific Māori Development funds – the Finance Minister said this is because Te Puni Kōkiri had not used past money, and that Māori are gaining outcomes elsewhere; whereas the Minister for Māori Development denied (wrongly) that was the Budget reality;
  • Whānau Ora is to be externally reviewed – although a Te Puni Kōkiri evaluation released this month of the initiative finds no issues arising; and
  • the Government has rejected building a mega prison at Waikeria instead a 500 bed rebuild will be undertaken, linked to a 100 bed secure mental health facility, a policy decision which suggests greater awareness of the significant link between criminal offending and poor mental health.

These items are further discussed below. Further information is available within the appendices and Pānui editions as referenced.

Social Policy Matters

Overview of Socio-Economic Matters

Data released this quarter continues to show ongoing socio-economic disparities presenting between Māori and other New Zealanders, with no significant positive or negative change. Two key statistics for the quarter are that:

  • 97,400 Māori (aged 18-64 years) and their household whānau are welfare reliant – this is circa 26% of working age Māori adults; and
  • 6% of Māori in the labour force were unemployed, (33,100 people). By comparison, the New Zealand overall unemployment rate was about half of that, at 4.4%[1]

Education Sector Summary

This quarter the New Zealand Qualifications Authority released the 2017 NCEA results; which showed around 74% of Year 12 Māori learners achieved NCEA level 2. This was about the same as the previous year, and ten percentile points below non-Māori.  Research and ideas for addressing schooling disparities continued to be tabled, with a discussion on racial bias making it into the official policy papers as one rationale for reforming the school sector.

More positively, new research on literacy shows significant gains across the Māori population over the last decade – with 81% of Māori now having fair or better English language literacy (which is needed for workforce gains). Te Reo literacy is also strong, with Māori school learners found to be enjoying this subject and also out-performing others across the board.  This success perhaps links back to the racial bias / differing cultural capital discussion – i.e. if most teachers were Māori and taught subjects such as maths and science from a Māori perspective (as Te Reo is) would the results across the nation be different?  Other education items of note:

  • The Treasury contributed to the disparity discussion with research that confirmed the obvious conclusion that students who change schools a lot are at educational risk – and they noted Māori more than others are in this grouping;
  • the Ministry of Education’s tertiary research analyst released a report that confirms that greater proportions of Māori study at the lower levels in the tertiary education sector (linked to lower school qualifications). The result of the tertiary education outcome is that a qualification disadvantage presents within the workforce thereby suppressing Māori wages and employment opportunities;
  • research about the Youth Guarantee initiative was released, which shows the programme is successful in keeping students engaged in education (good), but that links to tertiary level 4 study and industry training / apprenticeships and the like, are not clearly proven (not good). e. whilst these students (many are Māori) undertake trade preparation type courses, the initiative is not actually giving them a direct pathway into employment within the trade sectors.

Health Sector Summary

In the health sector, as always, an assortment of research data was published. This quarter disparities were shown in areas such as tamariki deaths, abortion rates, children with “major social, emotional and/or behavioural problems”, elderly nutrition, colorectal cancer, and non-seat belt wearing car accident deaths.  Probably all well intended studies and data sets, but collectively all reflecting the differences in how Māori and non-Māori live so differently within the same geopolitical terra firma.

The key item within the health sector, however, was the announcement of a major review of how services work. We note, in regard to the review, Health Minister David Clark states, “we need to face up to the fact that our health system does not deliver equally well for all. We know our Māori and Pacific peoples have worse health outcomes and shorter lives. That is something we simply cannot accept.”   Given the above data, which is relentless every quarter in showing some form of health disparity, in our view the Minister could not be more veridical.

Housing Sector Summary

In the housing sector Minister Phil Twyford (re)announced $63.4 million funding for ‘Housing First Fund’, which is focusing on increasing houses available for vulnerable families. The need for this was also (re)confirmed with the Ministry of Social Development also releasing its public housing quarterly report, to 31 March 2018.   The report finds that 36% (23,600-odd) public housing tenants are Māori.  That is disproportionately high, given Māori are 15% of the total population.   In addition, there is a register of who needs a house and qualify for assistance, but do not have one – of these people we advise 44% are Māori (circa 3,500 tangata.)

Overall this type of data points towards housing being an issue of prominence for Māori – i.e. over 10% of all Māori may be living in or needing state/public housing – compared with about 1% of non-Māori. The next policy action required from this Ministry is to better link this data with sole-parent and gender information, as indicative links with household income data point towards sole-mothers, mainly Māori, being the grouping disproportionately in need.

Justice Sector Summary

There were two key items within the justice sector this quarter of relevance to Māori. First, as above, the Government announced it would not build a mega prison at Waikeria, but it would rebuild a smaller prison, and a 100-bed secure mental health facility.  While this is well short of the radical tikanga Māori prison proposal Minister Kelvin Davis broached back when he was in opposition, it is a step towards better recognising the strong link between criminal offending and poor mental health.  The Government’s Waikeria decision ties in well with the second item of note: robust research from the Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Scientific Advisor showing that early intervention works best in preventing offending.  This is partially because young offenders often have mental health issues: for example, alcohol or drug dependencies, which can be addressed early thereby mitigating offending and other social ills.  Note also this quarter the Ministry of Health released a research report indicating perhaps 12% of Māori children, around 23,000, may have what they classified as ‘significant social, emotional and/or behavioural problems’.

In our assessment while there has been a known link between criminal offending and health previously, there does appear to be a conceptual shift away from the notion that some people are ‘criminals’ (full stop), towards an understanding that many people who commit offences do so because of a period of poor mental health, which means they do not appropriately regulate their own behaviours. This discussion is particularly important for Māori, as about half of the people incarcerated in New Zealand prisons are Māori, and Māori also have much higher rates of reported mental health issues.  Accordingly, the scientific recommendation to focus on mitigation of poor health and behaviour issues early in life does present as a sensible basis for new policies, including the proposal that Māori approaches be used to support Māori tamariki.  This in our view is ‘not rocket science’, but it is now published scientific research none the less.

Social Sector Summary

In the social wellbeing sector, as noted above, 97,000 Māori households are welfare reliant. Statistics New Zealand also released data which showed poor households such as these face greater inflation pressures.  A link to the increased price of tobacco was made, implying tobacco consumption is detrimental to household finances, not just population health.   In addition, funding to reduce family violence was also (re)announced; and The Treasury released a report indicating they are still beavering away somewhere on what wellbeing might actually be; (possibly it will mean having more money to pay the bills, having a home, being free of violence and the like, but they have not landed it just yet).  A separate Māori wellbeing framework is also being considered by The Treasury.  (We note Whānau Ora contains a solid Māori wellbeing framework, but The Treasury does not acknowledge its existence.)

The annual evaluation of Whānau Ora was released by Te Puni Kōkiri (TPK). We found it to be a weak evaluation report which identified no issues arising and continued to under-explain this initiative.  Ironically, that report was released (without a Ministerial forward) just weeks after the Government announced it would review Whānau Ora, and with terms of reference that clearly signals that transparency and accountability are items for improvement.  We interpret that as a vote of no-confidence in TPK in this work area.   However, perhaps more directly relevant to many Māori whānau (circa one-third) is that this quarter the Government confirmed that it would review the entire welfare system.  Quite what this entails is not yet clear.

Economic Matters

The Budget

The major economic item for the quarter is the Government’s Budget, released in May. Overall the Government is forecasting an operating surplus of $3.1 billion, even after taking into account its new spending.  But as advised above, for Vote: Māori Development funding is to drop, this year, and every year forecast afterwards.[2]  As previously noted Finance Minister Grant Robertson says the drop in Vote: Māori Development reflects programmes that Te Puni Kōkiri did not deliver on being removed from the Budget – so again an implicit vote of no confidence for TPK, which is presenting as somewhat under siege.  In his view, however, Māori whānau are estimated to receive $1.5 billion more in services through the Government’s wider programmes, such as the Families Package: however we can see no means for the Government to evidence that estimate.

In our assessment, funds removed from Te Puni Kōkiri will reduce its policy function from this year – effectively retarding its ability to give advice on the impact of mainstream programmes on Māori. This is despite the fact that there are service gaps – i.e. disparities being experienced by Māori in all social areas, including health, education and housing – some of which are shown in the discussion above.

We note there has been no consultation with Māori, and no explanation as to why Māori Development funds went unspent last year. The denials of funding cuts by Ministers Mahuta and Jackson do not help the situation.[3]  In short, the Labour Party holds all seven Māori electoral seats in Parliament and has the largest number of Māori members of Cabinet than at any time previously.  At both Ratana and Waitangi Day earlier this year the Government indicated it would increase Māori services, so it follows some Māori voters may feel betrayed by this Budget, and particularly by the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, who so far has tabled no clear initiatives nor policy plan for Māori Development.  The pressure will be on her to deliver something in next year’s Budget; and she will also need to either express a higher level of confidence in Te Puni Kōkiri or to propose something better.

Pānui also reviewed other Vote areas in regard to Māori specific funding. Information is provided in the appendices: there were no radical changes of note.

 

Other Economic Matters

Six other economic matters of note are listed below.

  • The consultancy firm TDB Advisory released a report summarising the financial performance of eight iwi, from 2011 to 2017.  The iwi groups are Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrakei, Rangitāne o Wairau, Raukawa, Ngāi Tūhoe and Waikato-Tainui. All have made money, a few have made lots of money (e.g. Waikato-Tainui had a strong financial year), with very good returns on their investments.
  • The Productivity Commission released a draft report on climate change, proposing new legislation and a new Commission to assist future Governments achieve a low emission economy. For Māori they suggest a Treaty of Waitangi clause would be useful for incoming legislation, combined with some type of Māori advisory committee.
  • The Ministry for the Environment also published work on climate change, with a report from its technical working group being released. This group has a range of recommendations to reduce emissions, and for Māori specifically they suggest the Government “commission mātauranga Māori-led measures that reflect cultural impacts of climate change and are developed and managed by iwi/hapū”.
  • The Land and Water Forum released a new report focusing on how to prevent degradation of water quality, particularly sediment and nitrogen pollutants. In relation to Māori, the Forum repeats its views that Māori interests in water (i.e. any proprietary and usage rights) are in their ‘too-hard’ basket, and thus the Crown needs to address such matters directly.   They point out the current situation is creating uncertainty which undermines long term investment decisions needed to improve water quality.  Hence their recommendation that “Central government must, as a priority, work with iwi to reach agreement on how to resolve rights and interests in fresh water.”.
  • The Government announced that the offshore block offers for oil and gas exploration permits will end (i.e. no new offers to be made). The block offer was an annual tender process established by the former National led Government that allowed for oil and gas companies to bid for permits. Many iwi groups had petitioned about oil exploration in their respective off-shore areas.
  • The Government has announced it is reviewing consumer credit regulations, of interest as Māori are identified as one grouping at risk – which is no surprise given the high percentage of welfare reliance noted above.

Treaty Matters

Waitangi Tribunal Matters
This quarter the Waitangi Tribunal released its report on its Whakatōhea Mandate Inquiry. The Tribunal found the Crown breached the Treaty of Waitangi by prioritising its objective of seeking to conclude a Treaty settlement over processes that were fair to the hapū groupings within Whakatōhea.  Thus the decision to recognise the pre-settlement Trust mandate was found not to be fair, reasonable or made in good faith.  This is consistent with the Tribunal’s view in other areas: that mandate issues, including hapū consent must be satisfactorily resolved before the Crown pushes ahead with negotiations.

Treaty Settlements
This quarter Parliament made progress with five Treaty settlements; with two of these reaching conclusion and thus becoming law. The groupings were:

  • Ngāti Rangi (legislation introduced to Parliament);
  • Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Tamaoho (both had respective second readings)[4];
  • Heretaunga Tamatea and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki both had their respective third readings – thereby concluding these two settlements of circa $100 million and $13 million respectively.

Government and Parliamentary Matters
In addition to the above sector issues, we note three further Parliamentary matters of note this quarter.

  • Adding to the Treaty settlement concerns of Whakatōhea, the Minister for Māori Development has advised she has asked for an independent review of the governance and management of the Whakatōhea Trust Board;
  • A Bill to entrench Māori electoral seats was introduced to Parliament.
  • Referenda were held by five local bodies in regard to the establishment of Māori wards – in all cases the notion of Māori wards was rejected by voters. This situation of predominantly non-Māori voters determining how Māori voters may be represented within local Government presents to us as manifestly unjust.  The matter is discussed within Pānui 15/2018.

[1] This data is from Statistics New Zealand and the Ministry of Social Development data sets.

[2] It will drop by $2 million in the year ahead (even after setting aside all extraordinary increases this year), and by $17 million over the next four years.

[3] Their answers to Parliamentary Questions have been provided in Pānui so that subscribers can determine for themselves the integrity of the responses given to challenging questions.

[4] The Ngāti Porou Bill relates to marine and foreshore matters.

Comprehensive Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership 26 January 2018 (Edition 1/2018)

This week the Government announced the successful conclusion of negotiations for the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP, formally known as the TTP). The Government has signalled its intent to sign the trade agreement, with ten other Pacific-rim nations in Chile on 8 March.  The big withdrawal of course, is the United States, but the big new market inclusion for New Zealand is Japan (the world’s third largest economy and where New Zealand has no current trade agreement.)

The Government’s view is that the new deal satisfies its five pre-conditions, which makes it different from the past National Government deal, namely; “(i) increased export markets, (ii) upholding the Treaty of Waitangi, (iii) protecting the Pharmac model, (iv) preserving the right to regulate in the public interest, and (v) narrowing the scope of investor State dispute settlements.” They also consider that changes to the Overseas Investment Act (amendments now before Parliament) will reaffirm that it is not a right for an overseas buyer to purchase a house in New Zealand – thereby protecting the property market from external inflation pressures.

We note that when the TPP was first announced there was significant Māori protest against it. Some of the protest was concern about what would happen with wages and employment levels – i.e. would more jobs disappear to countries with cheaper labour, and/or would the deal suppress New Zealand labour rates?  Other parts of the protest concerned Māori rangatiratanga under such a trade-deal.  However we note presently Māori voices on the matter are generally mute.[1]  We suspect that is because, with the new text not yet available, it is difficult to see if the proposal is actually substantially different from the past or not.  (I.e. there already was a Treaty protection clause in the last version, which the Waitangi Tribunal found was sufficient.)  Once the text is released we will review the matter further from a Māori policy perspective, but based on present information we cannot see how it might protects Māori workers any more than the previous TPP.

[1] Additionally we note the Green Party has indicated they will vote against this legislation.

Te Ture Whenua Reforms – Defunct for No 26 January 2018 (Edition 1/2018)

Late last year the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, withdrew the Te Ture Whenua Bill from the legislative agenda. It was very close to passing under the former Minister, Te Ururoa Flavell, being in the final stage of the Parliamentary Committee of the Whole House.  But the Labour Party had campaigned hard against the Bill, and has now indicated they will progress only more limited amendments to current Māori land law.

With former Minister Te Ururoa Flavell out of Parliament, it was left to Chris Finlayson, to accuse the Government of throwing away an opportunity to support Māori development. In return the Government accused National / the Māori Party of wasting circa $5 million on the exercise that had (in their view) specious gains for Māori.

This area of policy is detailed, so we will write more on Māori land reforms once the new Government clarifies what it will and won’t progress – in particular the proposed Māori Land Service. However the headline is that nothing is going to happen fast given the removal from the Parliamentary agenda.

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 19 June 2015 (edition 21/2015)

  • The submission period for the draft Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill has been extended to Friday 7 August 2015. For further information on the draft bill refer to Pānui edition 18/2015.
  • This week a media outlet reported on a New Zealand Police intervention which refers Māori drivers without a valid licence in the Counties Manukau District to attend training, and gain the correct licence – rather than receive an immediate fine.  If completed successfully no fine is issued.  The purpose of this is to reduce Māori road trauma and offending, in accordance with the Police Turning of the Tide strategy (Pānui 28/2014 refers).   The media outlet suggested this was a race-based policy that benefits only Māori.
  • Ngā Ruahine are considering appealing the Environmental Protection Authority decision to grant a 35-year marine consent to Shell Todd Oil Services to continue running its Maui offshore oil and gas field off the Taranaki coast.
  • Ngāti Ruanui are supporting a petition created by Kiwis Against Seabed Mining (KASM) calling for a moratorium on all seabed mining in New Zealand waters, until a more thorough understanding of the risks and impacts are understood.
  • Last week we advised Dr Lance O’Sullivan was appointed Chairman of Te Whānau o Hato Petera Trust.  This is the Trust that oversees the hostel at Hato Petera College.  Subscribers may recall quality concerns are presenting at this college, Pānui 43/2014 refers.  However this week, the appointment has been ruled to be invalid by the incumbent Chair, Tame Te Rangi, on the grounds that a 5-1 vote in favour of Dr O’Sullivan failed as there was an insufficient quorum.  (The board has twelve positions, but six are presently vacant.)  In response, Dr O’Sullivan is said to be seeking a whānau hui this weekend, to have more members elected to the board, allowing for a further attempt at gaining the chairperson’s role.  Mr Te Rangi, however, has indicated that there is a formal process for calling a special general meeting which must be followed.  In addition, Dr O’Sullivan has indicated there have been incidents of serious student bullying within the hostel, and a matter has been referred to the Police for their consideration.
  • Last Friday the University of Otago published an online research report called Oranga Niho me Ngā Tangata Whaiora: Oral health and Māori Mental Health Patients.  The research studied the effect of rehabilitative dental treatment on mental health, oral health, and quality of life; and found positive improvements with improved care.   The report can be view here: http://www.otago.ac.nz/sjwri/otago110932.pdf

Māori News Stories for the Weeks Ending 15 May and 22 May 2015

Social Matters

Valuation of the Benefit System

Last Thursday the Minister of Social Development, Anne Tolley, released a summary of key findings from the report Valuation of the Benefit System for Working Age Adults: as at 30 June 2014. The report was prepared by Taylor Fry (a consultancy firm) and was published on the Ministry of Social Development website in February. 

The report outlines the lifetime costs of approximately 570,000 working-age Work and Income New Zealand clients who received income support for the year ending 30 June 2014.  The total estimated cost (liability) of benefit payments and related expenses for clients who received income support until they reach retirement age is $69 billion.  Key Māori findings of note are:

  • 38 percent of Work and Income New Zealand clients aged 18 to 24 years are Māori;
  • intergenerational benefit receipt was highest amongst Māori; with 87 percent of Māori clients aged 18 to 24 years having at least one parent receiving a benefit. The rate was 65 percent for non-Māori;[1]
  • 54 percent of Māori clients aged 18 to 24 years are clients with intensive family benefit history. A client with intensive family benefit history is described as a client whose parent was intensively in the benefit system during the years the client was aged 13 to 17 years.
  • Māori are disproportionately at risk of longer benefit reliance compared with non-Māori. The report identifies a correlation between intergenerational benefit receipt and longer benefit terms;
  • The concentration of Māori beneficiaries is highest in Northland, East Cost and Bay of Plenty regions;
  • Māori living in Auckland or Northland will receive on average $40,000 more in benefits than other ethnic groups in these regions.Despite these marked disparities between Māori and non-Māori, the study does not propose any solutions or recommendations for change.  We also advise, Minister Tolley’s press release on this matter failed to identify any issues presenting in relation to Māori – like her Ministry she remains silent on ethnic differences in this area.  That is, within the welfare sector there is still no formal acknowledgement of the need to consider and address Māori welfare dependency as a unique policy matter.The report can be viewed here:

http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/media-releases/2015/valuation.pdf

Census – Education and Training Data Released

Last Tuesday Statistics New Zealand published, 2013 Census – Education and Training Data.  The publication provides information on education, training engagement, and formal qualifications attained for people aged 15 years and over, derived from census data.

Overall the proportion of people with formal qualifications increased to 79 percent in 2013; up from 75 percent in 2006. For Māori 67 percent held a formal qualification in 2013; up from 60 percent in 2006. Noteworthy is the increase of Māori with bachelor degrees – increasing to 7.5 percent (27,057 people) in 2013, from 5.5 percent (17,907 people) in 2006.   Other findings of note were:

  • 30 percent of Māori aged 15-years and older have no formal qualifications;
  • the highest qualification for 41 percent of Māori (147,900) was a level 1–3 tertiary certificate; and
  • 48 percent of Māori aged 15 to 19 years were enrolled in school or tertiary study (circa 35,000 people).

The publication can be viewed here: http://www.stats.govt.nz/Census/2013-census/profile-and-summary-reports/qstats-education-training.aspx

 

Māori Life Expectancy

Earlier this month Statistics NZ published, The New Zealand Period Life Tables: 2012–14.   Findings show that the difference between Māori and non-Māori life expectancy at birth has reduced to 7.1 years (it was previously 7.3 years).  Male Māori life expectancy at birth is now 73 years, compared with 79.5 years for all males.  Māori female life expectancy is 77.1 years, compared with to 83.2 years for all females.

Quarterly Labour Market Scorecard – March 2015

Last Thursday the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a Labour Market Scorecard for the quarter ending 31 March 2015. The scorecard is a one-page summary on labour market statistics and indicators. The key Māori statistics and indicators for the March 2015 quarter are:

  • 63.3 percent of Māori 18 year-old school levers in 2013 attained NCEA level 2 or higher;
  • 29.6 percent of Māori school levers in 2013 did not attain NCEA level 1;
  • the Māori unemployment rate is 12.6 percent; and
  • the Māori Labour force participation is 66.5 percent.Pānui has already advised on these matters as the data was released,referto Pānui 15/2015 for details.

     

    Economic Matters

    FoMA Members – Agricultural Production Tables as at 30 June 2014

    Last Monday Statistics New Zealand published agricultural production tables from a survey of farms owned by members of the Federation of Māori Authorities (FoMA), as at 30 June 2014.

    Key findings show the average size of a FoMA member farm is circa 2,260 hectares – approximately nine times larger than the average New Zealand farm size.  Federation members own and manage 266,400ha of farm and forestry; which represents 1.9% of New Zealand’s total farm and forestry production land.[2]  Federation members also own 0.9% of deer; 1.9% of sheep; 1.9% of beef cattle, and 0.6% of dairy stock in New Zealand.

    Pukeroa Oruawhata Group Receives Tourism Funding

    On Wednesday the Minister of Tourism, John Key, announced the Pukeroa Oruawhata Group and its business partner, World Spa Ltd, will receive $350,000 from the Tourism Growth Partnership fund.  The funding will be invested in the first stage of a proposed large scale health and well-being complex on the Rotorua lakefront.

    Toi Moana Bay of Plenty Regional Growth Study Published

    Last Tuesday a Toi Moana Bay of Plenty Regional Growth Study was published on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment website. The report was prepared by MartinJenkins (a consultancy firm) and commissioned by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

    The report is the third in a series of regional growth studies, which have the purpose of “identifying the sectors and commercial opportunities in each region that have the potential to sustainably grow incomes, jobs and investment”.   We are reviewing this document to determine relevance for Māori, and will advise further.

    The report can be viewed here: http://www.med.govt.nz/sectors-industries/regions-cities/research/regional-growth-studies/toi-moana-bay-of-plenty-regional-growth-study-opportunities

     

    Ngāi Tahu Tourism Wins Trade Award

    Ngāi Tahu Tourism has won the Auckland International Airport Award for Excellence in Tourism at the HSBC China Business Awards.

     

    Te Tatau Pounamu – Māori Representation and Participation Conference

The New Zealand Māori Council will be hosting a one day Māori Representation and Participation Conference, 31 May 2015 in Palmerston North.  The conference is entitled Te Tatau Pounamu to register or view the full conference programme athttp://www.maoricouncil.com/2015/05/12/te-tatau-pounamu-conference-programme-and-registration/

 

 

Treaty Matters

Araukuku Hapū – Urgent Hearing with the Waitangi Tribunal Declined

This month Araukuku, a South Taranaki hapū lodged an application with the Wellington High Court seeking a review of a Waitangi Tribunal decision not to grant an urgent hearing into its claim (Wai 552) to have the hapū removed from Ngāruahine Deed of Settlement.  The Deed of Settlement was signed in August 2014, but the Tribunal application was only lodged in February 2015 (with Tribunal decision being released on 7 May).

 

The Crown purchase Battle of Ōrākau site

The Crown has purchased a 9.7 hectare property at Ōrākau near Kihikihi. The property was the site of the 1864 Battle of Ōrākau. The land will be placed in the Office of Treaty Settlements Landbank and maintained by the Crown while consultation with iwi, the Heritage Society and Waipa Council continue on its future governance and management.

 

Appointments

Dame Tariana Turia has been appointed to the Superu Board – Social Policy Evaluation and Research Unit.

 



[1]Note, this is inclusive of beneficiaries aged 24 years.

[2]Federation members also own 0.9% of deer; 1.9% of sheep; 1.9% of beef cattle, and 0.6% of dairy stock in New Zealand.

 

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 8 May 2015 (edition 15)

  • This week two renowned Māori language stalwarts died; Henrietta Maxwell (Ngāti Porou), and Erima Henare (Ngāti Hine).  Henrietta Maxwell was a founding figure of the Kōhanga Reo movement, author and Te Ataarangi advocate.  Erima Henare was Chairperson of the Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori / the Māori Language Commission.  Haere atu rā kōrua, okioki mai rā ki roto i ngā ringaringa o te Wāhi Ngaro.
  • Last Friday the Aotearoa New Zealand Māori Business Leaders Awards were held in Auckland. Award winners were:
  • Kingi Smiler – Outstanding Māori business leader;
  • Mavis Mullins – Māori woman business leader;
  • Ngarimu Blair – Emerging Māori business leader;
  • Tainui Group Holdings – Outstanding Māori business leadership;
  • Ella Henry – Dame Mira Szaszy Māori alumni; and
  • Melanie Smith – Dame Mira Szaszy Māori alumni.

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 27 March 2015 (edition 9/2015)

 

  • Last Thursday the Members’ Bill of Meka Whaitiri was drawn from the ballot in parliament, and is now lodged on the Parliamentary Order Paper.[1] The bill is the Environmental Protection Authority (Protection of Environment) Amendment Bill.  Ms Whaitiri proposes to insert a new objective in the Environment Protection Authority Act 2011 to ensure the Authority must, “aim to protect, maintain and enhance New Zealand’s environment”.  In her view, this extended definition of purpose is required to ensure the Authority always puts environmental considerations ahead of other matters.  National Party Minister for the Environment, Nick Smith, however, considers that adding such words is superfluous, given the Authority’s sole purpose is to consider environmental matters.  He has indicated the Government will therefore vote against the bill.

    We have previously advised on provisions within this legislation area, particularly in relation to Māori and iwi concerns and submissions (Pānui 7/2012 refers).  Our assessment has been that this legislation underserves Māori.  In part this is because the Māori Advisory Committee established within the Act has a weak legislative mandate as it is unable to make binding recommendations on any party.  The Committee provides case-by-case considerations upon request, is advisory only, and is effectively toothless.  Accordingly from a Māori policy perspective there is scope to improve the legislative framework to better reflect Māori needs and aspirations.  It is then surprising that Ms Whaitiri, who is the parliamentarian representing Ika Rāwhiti constituents – i.e. she represents Māori only – appears to have excluded matters which impact on Māori from her sole legislative proposal.

Appointments 

  • Hinurewa Poutu and Dr Ruka Broughton have been appointed to the board of the Māori Language Commission / Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori.
  • Last week Te Puni Kōkiri launched Te Whakahura a Kupe, a web-based socio demographic database tool which disaggregates census data via iwi and rohe.  The database includes 98 iwi, and data sets available include various health, education, employment and housing information collected from both the 2006 and 2013 censuses.  (I.e. how many people of a particular iwi have employment, own their home, have tertiary qualifications, etc).  In our view this is a particularly useful tool for researchers and policy advisors, it can be viewed here:

    http://kupe.tpk.govt.nz/

  • On Wednesday Miraka received the inaugural ‘He Kai Kei Aku Ringa – Māori Excellence in Export’ award at the 2015 New Zealand International Business Awards.
  • This week the Annual General Meeting of Te Ohu Kaimoana was held.  Reports of the financial returns of both Aotearoa Fisheries and Sealord have arisen from this meeting, but are not yet publicly available. (We will review when published.)
  • On Thursday three finalist for the 2015 Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming Award for sheep and beef were announced.  The finalist are Mangaroa Station (located north-west of Wairoa) Paua Station (located north of Kaitaia) and Maranga Station (located south-west of Gisborne).  The winner will be named at the Awards dinner on May 29 in Whanganui.
  • Today Ngāruahine will receive an apology from the Crown for illegally incarcerating iwi members in the South Island during the 1880s.
  • On 30-31 March Te Wānanga o Raukawa and the Māori Unit within the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (Te Wāhanga) will co-hosting a forum on rangatiratanga; entitled ‘Kei Tua o te Pae’.  Details can be found here:

    http://www.nzcer.org.nz/events/kei-tua-hui

  • This week legal action between a grouping of former board members of Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Whāngaroa and the Ministry of Education has been withdrawn.  (The legal challenge arose from the removal of the school board in 2013).  By way of background, in June 2014 the Secretary of Education and Chief Executive of the Ministry of Education, Peter Hughes, dissolved the Board, and replaced it with a commissioner.  This action followed significant student / whanau exit from the school; concerns about an inappropriate relationship between a former principal (Louisa Mutu) and a student; and concerns that board elections were not held in accordance with Education Act (allegedly no formal advertisements, only school newsletter information and letters).

    The former board members objected to the need for a commissioner, indicating that they had address the conduct of the former principal appropriately, and had advertised elections in a means suitable their community.  They also objected to the commissioner appointed, Mr Larry Forbes.  Accordingly they had originally been seeking a High Court injunction against the interventions.  However in December 2014 Hōhepa Campbell took over the commissioner role and new board elections were facilitated this year.  Election results are now pending.  (Pānui 21/2014 refers.)



[1] By way of background, Members’ Bills are proposed changes to legislation lodged by individual members of parliament.  Members are allowed to lodge one bill each of their own design (i.e. it is not required to be a ‘party policy’ bill).  If the bill is drawn in the parliamentary ballot then it is placed on the Order Paper (i.e. parliamentary agenda), and will receive at least a first reading in parliament, and be voted on at that point.

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 20 March 2015

 

  • On Wednesday the Education (Breakfast and Lunch Programmes in Schools) Amendment Bill was read for a first time in parliament.  The bill was voted down by the National, Act and United Future parties (61-59) and will therefore not proceed further.  By way of background, this Member’s Bill was initially introduced by Hone Harawira, and then sponsored by Green Party MP Metira Turei, following Mr Harawira’s departure from parliament.  The bill sought to amend the Education Act 1989 to provide for the introduction of state-funded breakfast and lunch programmes in designated schools (Pānui 18/2014 refers).  Also voted down at its first reading was a similar bill, the Education (Food in Schools) Amendment Bill, which was proposed by David Shearer.
  • Yesterday Dame Tariana Turia received an Outstanding Community Services Award, in the 2015 Luther L. Terry Awards for Exemplary Leadership in Tobacco Control.  (By way of background the awards, held triennially, are named in honour of the late United States Surgeon General Luther Terry, who led a landmark 1964 report that conclusively connected tobacco use to lung cancer and other illnesses.)  Dame Tariana received the award in Abu Dhabi.
  • Wakatū Incorporation-owned Aronui Wines has won the trophy for champion Pinot Gris at the Royal Easter Wine Show Awards.
  • On Saturday Ngāti Hine signed the ‘E Tu Whānau’ Charter of Commitment.  E Tu Whānau provides resources to assist whānau, iwi and rangatahi to live without violence.
  • This week the Prime Minister, John Key, is leading a ministerial delegation in Taranaki, with the purpose of meeting with local whānau, hapū, iwi, and Māori organisations to discuss issues that are presenting for them.  The hui are part of the Relationship Accord, Te Tatau ki te Paerangi, agreed between the Māori and National parties.
  • The Building and Housing Minister, Nick Smith, has announced that legislation will be introduced to allow 33 hectares of the 123 hectare Riccarton Racecourse reserve land to be converted into a housing development.  The legislation will provide for Ngāti Tahu to be offered the first right of purchase over the land; as provided for within the Treaty settlement between the Crown and Ngāti Tahu.  In effect this proposal will allow Ngāti Tahu to be the developer of the new subdivision.
  • This week voting as to whether the Far North District Council should establish dedicated Māori Wards closed. The results were 9,315 votes against the introduction of Māori wards, and 4,309 for the proposal.
  • The Minister of Māori Affairs, Te Ururoa Flavell, has been criticised by the Chairperson of Te Pou Matakana, Merepeka Raukawa-Tait, for retaining funding for Māori social housing within Te Puni Kōkiri.  Te Pou Matakana is the northern Whānau Ora commissioning agency. Mrs Raukawa-Tait is of the view the funding should be directly administered by Te Pou Matakana, as she considers they can perform better than Te Puni Kōkiri in this sector.
  • Yesterday Venture Taranaki released a report on the oil and gas industry.  The report entitled, ‘The Wealth Beneath Our Feet’, claims the industry is valued at $2.79 billion dollars, with over 11,700 people employed in the sector.   Within the report there is a one-page outline of differing Māori perspectives relating to this sector, prepared by Dion Tuuta (refer page 28).  The report can be found here:

http://www.taranaki.info/news/files/211.pdf

Summary of Publications and Policy Matters – 15 December 2014 to 23 January 2015 (edition 1/ 2015)

Publications Released

  • On 15 December 2014, the Waitangi Tribunal released in pre-publication form the fifth part of its report on Te Urewera claims.
  • On 19 December 2014 the Ministry of Primary Industries released two research reports on Māori agri-business activities.  We will provide reviews of this work in Pānui edition 2/2015 (next week).
  • On 16 January the Ministry of Social Development released updated benefit information. We will provide reviews of this work in Pānui edition 2/2015 (next week).Policy Announcements
  • The Tertiary Education Commission has selected Ngā Pae o te Maramatanga (NPM) as the only applicant to go forward to the next stage of the Maori CoRE funding round for 2016-2020. Bids led by Massey and Waikato did not go forward.
  • The Tertiary Education Commission has engaged the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) to develop a draft strategy to progress Māori adult literacy and numeracyConsultation will commence in February.Appointments
  • On 23 December the Minister of Māori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell, announced the permanent appointment of Michael Doogan to the Māori Land Court.
  • On 22 December the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister, Gerry Brownlee, announced membership of the new Canterbury Advisory Board on Transition (to shift powers from the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority to other entities).   Amongst others the Advisory Board includes Sir Mark Solomon, representing Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, and Maggy Tai Rakena, representing the not-for-profit sector.New Year Honours

On 1 January 2015 The Queen appointed a number of Māori to The New Zealand Order of Merit, including:[1]

DNZM

To be a Dame Companion of the said Order:

  • The Honourable Tariana Turia, of Whanganui. For services as a Member of Parliament.

CNZM

To be Companions of the said Order:

  • Mr Robin John Cooper, of Auckland. For services to Māori health.

ONZM

To be Officers of the said Order:

  • Dr Monty Glyn Soutar, of Gisborne. For services to Māori and historical research.
  • Mr Kukupa Tirikatene, of Auckland. For services to Māori and education.
  • Mrs Colleen Elizabeth Urlich, JP, of Dargaville. For services to Māori art.

MNZM

To be Members of the said Order:

  • Mr Roma Ruruku Hippolite, of Keilor, Australia. For services to Māori and health 

QSM

Queen’s Service Medal Awards

  • Ms Aroha Dawn Geraldine Campbell, of Rotorua. For services to Māori.
  • Mr Teariki Derrick Mei, of Wairoa. For services to Māori.
  • Ms Hoana Pearson, of Auckland. For services to Māori and education.


[1]Note it is possible there are other Māori who were appointed the New Zealand Order of Merit that we have not been able to identify by their recongition area.

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 5 December 2014 (edition 43)

  • Dr Wharehuia Milroy, Charisma Rangipunga, Dr Ruakere Hond, Dr Rawinia Higgins and Charlie Te Pana have been appointed as members of the Māori Language Advisory Group.  This group will provide advice to the Minister for Māori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell, on the Māori Language (Te Reo Māori) Bill.  Minister Flavell has indicated that he considers the bill requires refinements.  (The bill is current being considered by the Māori Affairs Select Committee.  Public submissions closed today.)
  • Jacqui Caine (Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Chile.
  • This week media outlets are reporting that Sealord has confirmed that 70 factory jobs, 11 office-based jobs and 30 contract roles will be disestablished at its Nelson wetfish factory.  (Sealord is 50% owned by Aotearoa Fisheries via a holding company, Kura, and in turn Aotearoa Fisheries is owned by iwi quota holders.)[1]
  • The New Zealand Māori Council has released its briefing to the incoming Government on its website.  In addition the Council has also released a Water Policy Statement.  We are reviewing these documents and will advise further in edition 44/2014.Note we will undertake these reviews in conjunction with a review of the Waitangi Tribunal findings relating to the Council’s claims concerning potential amendments to the Māori Community Development Act, which is the establishment legislation for the Council.  [By way of background, the Government consulted on options for amending this legislation in mid-2013, which resulted in the Council filing this Treaty claim, (WAI 2417), which was heard in March this year.  In sum, the Council’s view is that this legislation creates a form of Crown/Māori partnership, but the consultation process on amending the Act did not take that into account.  Pānui editions 36/2013, 44/2013 and 45/2013 provide further details on the consultation and proposals, and details on the Council’s response and claim.  This Tribunal’s report is expected to be available for public comment from next Monday.
  • In January the In-Zone Education Foundation will open a new residence for fifteen Māori and Pacific Island students wanting to attend Epsom Girls Grammar.  (By way of background, the In-Zone Education Foundation residence for Auckland Boys Grammar students was opened in 2011.)  All students living at the In-Zone residences are Māori or Pacific students from out-of-zone low income families, who would otherwise not be eligible to attend these schools.  Families of the students attending grant shared guardianship to the In-Zone Director, Terrance Wallace, which allows for the school enrolments to occur.
  • Maraeroa C Incorporation has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with a Beijing based company (name withheld). The joint venture will assist expanding Maraeroa C Incorporation ginseng plantation and provides an entry into the China market.
  • On Wednesday Ngāti Kauwhata and members of the Fielding community staged a peaceful protest to raise their concerns regarding the health of the Ōroua River.
  • The Waitangi Tribunal urgent hearing into the Ngāpuhi claims settlement process commenced this week.  In essence this claim challenges the right of the Crown to settle Treaty breaches with Tūhoronuku, in that it alleges the mandating process used by the Crown was of itself a Treaty of Waitangi breach (Pānui 41/2014 refers).
  • The Education Review Office has released a November report on Hato Petera College.  As quality concerns exist, the Office is reviewing this College at least every two years.  The key conclusion of this report is that:“Since 2012 the principal and staff have worked hard to improve student learning and welfare. Significant progress has resulted in a curriculum that raises student achievement.  Unfortunately, a lack of agreement with the Catholic Diocese about property and personnel matters, are impacting negatively on the board’s ability to continue improvements” (page 8).We consider that the conclusion is unhelpfully coy, and distorts the issues that have presented for this College in recent years.  I.e. do improvements bring the College up to an acceptable educational standard or not?  Further the issue around property, and the relationship between the Church, the School Trust Board, and Ministry of Education appears to be very significant (including a Treaty of Waitangi claim), but the Review Office report does not satisfactory explore ramifications.  The extract below provides a lens onto the type of issues presenting.

    “There is no clear agreement between the Catholic Diocese, Te Whānau o Hato Petera Trust, and the Ministry of Education as to who has the responsibility for the hostel buildings, and the land on which the buildings are situated.

    There is also uncertainty around the future tenure of the lease agreement on the school and the hostel facilities. The Catholic Diocese has offered a short-term lease extension, which leaves college and hostel boards with no clear commitment for future sustainability.” (Page 5.)



[1]There is no public media statement from Sealord to confirm this.

Māori news stories for the week ending 14 November 2014 (edition 40)

  • The Department of Corrections has announced that new prisoners will have pounamu or manaia removed, and returned to their whānau.   The stated reason is that the items are beings traded amongst prisoners, which has escalated conflicts.  Prisoners currently serving a sentence will not have to surrender their pounamu or manaia.  Māori Party spokesperson, Marama Fox, has indicated the party is concerned, noting no evidence has been provided by the Department for the decision, and accordingly has requested a meeting with the Minister for Corrections, Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga.  (We advise, if there is an issue of conflicts over trades, then by limiting but not eliminating supply, the Department could potentially be increasing such conflicts, if demand remains high.)
  • Ngāi Tūhoe is preparing to conduct a review of hunting permits issued within Te Urewera, in accordance with its management role over the area.  The iwi has indicated the review is focused on ensuring appropriate permit systems are in place, and better provide for information sharing.  Chairperson, Tamati Kruger, has indicated that previously there had been no monitoring of permits issued.
  • Media outlets are reporting that further job losses may occur at Sealord, and that iwi groups may be disenfranchised with the performance of the company, and seek a more active governance role in the future (as a potential outcome of the review of the Māori Fisheries Act).  Pānui is reviewing these matters, and will seek to provide a further summary brief on the review of this sector as it develops.
  • East Taupō Lands Trust, a Māori charitable trust has entered a honey supply partnership with Comvita.  East Taupō Lands Trust manage over 30,000 hectares of land south-east of Taupō.
  • A Ngāti Kahungunu Marae, Waipatu, is requesting a moratorium on water consent applications for the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council.  This is in response to a company, Elwood Road Holdings, seeking to increase its water extraction limitations from the Heretauranga aquifer (from 360,000 to 900,000 litres).  The water is sought for a bottled-water exporting company.