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Rōpu Māori

Articles about iwi groups and Māori organisations

E40 Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 16 November 2018

  • On Wednesday the Minister of Housing and Urban Development, Phil Twyford, announced that a Māori Housing Unit will be established as part of the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Minister Twyford also announced that Minister Nanaia Mahuta will be appointed as the Associate Minister of Housing and Urban Development – Māori Housing.
  • Te Rūnanga ō Ngāi Tahu has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Oranga Tamariki to work together when Ngāi Tahu children become part of Oranga Tamariki services.
  • Last week the Ministry of Health published data tables for registered fetal and infant deaths in 2015. The data showed that in 2015:
    • 6% (17,781) of all live births were Māori babies;
    • 26% (100) of all fetal deaths were Māori;
    • the Māori fetal death rate was 5.6 per 1,000 live Māori births (the lowest fetal death rate amongst recorded ethnic groups);
    • 7% (87) of all infant deaths were Māori; and
    • the Māori infant death rate was 4.9 per 1,000 live Māori births.
  • https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/fetal-and-infant-deaths-2015

  • This week the media released that Ngāti Hine Forestry destroyed $160,000 of pine seedlings which had been funded by the Government’s regional economic development One Billion Trees project. We advise that despite the initial loss on investment further projects between Ngāti Hine Forestry and Te Uru Rākau (Forestry New Zealand) are ongoing.
  • On Tuesday the declaration of voting results for the Whakatōhea Settlement Process were published. Whakatōhea iwi members were asked to vote on the following three questions:
    • 1. Do you support the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust continuing to negotiate to reach a settlement with the Crown of the historical Treaty claims of Whakatōhea?
    • 2a. Do you wish to see the current Treaty negotiations stopped in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start?
    • 2b. Do you wish to see the current Treaty negotiations stopped in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea?
      Overall, 56% of respondents to question 1. voted to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, 81 percent of respondents to question 2a. voted against stopping  current Treaty negotiations in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start, and 72% of respondents to question 2b. voted in favour of stopping current Treaty negotiations in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea.  How the Whakatōhea Settlement Process is to progress from this point forward is yet to be determined.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 9 November 2018

  • This week the Rātana Movement celebrated its centenary at Rātana Pa. The Rātana movement was founded by Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana on November 8 1918.
  • The fourth round of consultation hui on the proposal to evolve the Ngāpuhi mandate and negotiations structure commence this evening. In total twenty hui will be held including four across Australia. See appendix one for hui details.
  • This week the Marsden Fund awards for 2018 were announced. In total 85 research projects were successful of these the following 13 projects had a Māori focus:
o   Dr RS Phillipps Past Māori social organisation and movement in the North Island, New Zealand
o   Dr CM Greenhalgh Hapū: Women and Pregnancy in Twentieth-century New Zealand
o   Dr AG Harris Whanau Ora With, Against, and Beyond the State
o   Dr KA Paringatai E kore au e ngaro! The enduring legacy of whakapapa
o   Associate Professor AC Wanhalla Te Hau Kāinga: Histories and Legacies of the Māori Home Front, 1939-45
o   Professor M Kawharu A question of identity: how connected are Maori youth to ancestral marae, and does it matter?
o   Dr JW Tuaupiki Te Kāpaukura a Kupe: The Ocean in the Sky – Māori Navigation Knowledge
o   Associate Professor AG Hogg When and why did all the pā arrive? A multidisciplinary investigation into the spatial-temporal role of pā in the development of Māori culture
o   Dr WW Waitoki The embrace of our ancestors: reimagining and recontextualising mātauranga Māori in psychology.
o   Dr NA Hessell Sensitive Negotiations: Indigenous Diplomacy and British Romantic Poetry
o   Dr CI Schipper Navigating a Sea of Bias in the Study of Volcanic Gas Emissions: He Waka Eke Noa
o   Associate Professor J Kidman He Taonga te Wareware?: Remembering and Forgetting Difficult Histories in Aotearoa/ New Zealand
o   Professor JM Cumming Understanding the ‘black box’ of evaluation culture and practice in New Zealand.

 

Appendix One:
Ngāpuhi Mandate and Negotiations Structure Hui

Region Date and Time Location
Whangārei 9 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Whangārei Terenga Parāoa Marae, Morningside, Whangarei
Mangakāhia 10 November, 8.30 – 11am Maungarongo Marae,  Porotī, Northland
Hokianga 10 November, 1.30 – 3.30pm Pākanae Marae, Ōpononi, Northland
Kaikohe 10 November, 5 -7pm Kaikohe & District Memorial RSA, Kaikohe
Whangaroa 11 November, 8.30 -10.30am Whangaroa College, Kaeo
Te Pēwhairangi 11 November, 12 to 2pm Waitangi Copthorne, Waitangi, Bay of Islands.
Tāmaki ki te Tonga 11 November, 6 – 8pm Holiday Inn Auckland Airport, Mangere, Auckland.
Hamilton 12 November, 11am – 1pm Distinction Hamilton Hotel &

Conference Centre, Hamilton.

Tāmaki ki raro 12 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Alexandra Park, Greenlane, Auckland.
Dunedin 12 November, 6 -8pm Te Huka Mātauraka Māori Centre,

University of Otago, Dunedin.

Wellington 13 November, 8.30 – 10.30am Te Wharewaka o Pōneke, Wellington.
Whanganui 13 November, 5.30pm -7.30pm Whanganui Function Centre, The Racecourse, Whanganui.
Invercargill 13 November, 5.30 -7.30pm Corinthian Convention Centre, Invercargill
Christchurch 14 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Crowne Plaza, 764 Colombo Street, Christchurch
Napier 15 November, 11am – 1pm Napier War Memorial and Conference Centre, Napier
Rotorua 15 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Novotel Rotorua Lakeside, Rotorua.
Tūranga (Gisborne) 15 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm Emerald Hotel, Gisborne.
Perth 17 November, 3 -5pm Darius Wells Library and Resource Centre, Ken Jackman Hall, Chisham Avenue & Robbos Place, Kwinana Town Centre, Western Australia
Brisbane 18 November, 10:30am -1pm Wynnum Manly Leagues Club, 92 Wondall Rd, Manly Queensland.
Melbourne 18 November, 12 -2pm Dandenong Workers Social Club, 52-70 Wedge Street, Dandenong, Victoria.
Sydney 18 November, 7 -9pm Te Wairua Tapu Whare Karakia, 587 Elizabeth Street, Redfern, New South Wales.

 

Edition 38, Salient Māori News Items to 2 November 2018

  • Stacey Morrison (Ngāi Tahu, Te Arawa) has been appointed to the Ministerial Advisory Group on Public Media.
  • Martin Enright (Ngāti Pākehā) has been awarded a 2019 Winston Churchill Fellowship. Mr Enright will study targeted procurement policies in organisations in Canada and the United States of America to inform and support Māori economic empowerment in Tāmaki Makaurau and Aotearoa.
  • On Monday Te Whakatōhea Mussels celebrated the expansion of their mussel farm operations by holding a launch for their newest vessel, named Kukutai. The new vessel will help grow Te Whakatōhea Mussels’ existing annual harvest from 1,500 tonnes to up to 6,000 tonnes. The company is also awaiting consent to build an Opōtiki based processing factory. When the factory opens it will create employment opportunities for residents.
  • The Kawerau Putauaki Trust Industrial Development will receive $2 million from the Provincial Growth Fund to develop roading and other infrastructure required to support the regions’ primary industries.
  • This week the Overseas Investment Office approved Chinese company Guangxi Fenglin Wood Industry Group’s application to lease 33 hectares of land and build a wood particle board factory in Kawerau. The land is owned by Putauaki Trust. The factory will create employment for up to 100.
  • Ohia Bentham (Ngāi Te Rangi, Ngāti Pūkenga, Ngāti Ranginui, Te Āti Awa, Ngāti Rārua) has been appointed the Māori Party Vice President (tāne).
  • Ngāi Tahu Property will enter a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Queenstown Lakes District Council to explore development options in the Queenstown CBD.
  • This week the Ministry of Education published an Early Childhood Education Attendance report for 2017. The report showed that overall, 65.5% of children aged 0 to 4 years in New Zealand attended an early childhood education service. For tamariki Māori, 17% attended a Kōhanga reo, 58% attended a teacher lead education and care service, 15% attended kindergarten and 7% attended home-based services.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/188238/Understanding-attendance-results-from-the-2017-Early-Childhood-Education-census-v4.pdf

  • This week applications for the 2019 Te Pūnaha Hihiko: Vision Mātauranga Capability Fund opened. Up to $4 million in funding is available for people and organisations undertaking or planning research which supports the four themes of the Vision Mātauranga Policy:
    • indigenous innovation;
    • taiao (achieving environmental sustainability);
    • hauora/oranga (improving health and social wellbeing); and
    • mātauranga (exploring indigenous knowledge).

Applications close 12 noon, 19 February 2019.

https://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/science-innovation/funding-info-opportunities/investment-funds/vmcf/application-and-assessment-information

  • This week Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) – New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence announced nine research projects of investment:

http://www.maramatanga.ac.nz/projects

E36 19 October 2018: Social Research and Policy Snippets

Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry

The Minister of Health, David Clark, has advised that an extension has been given for the report on the Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry back to Cabinet. It will now be delivered by 30 November.  This is to recognise the 5,500 submissions were received on this topic.  (Note the submissions are considered sensitive and are therefore not available for public purview.)

By way of background, the inquiry is broad in scope, and the terms of reference enable recommendations to be made across all structures within the health and the broader public sector.  The inquiry is chaired by Professor Ron Paterson, and there are two Māori on the panel of six (Sir Mason Durie and Dean Rangihuna). This is a policy area of particular importance to Māori, as Māori are significantly over-represented in mental health service areas, and in suicide statistics. The terms of reference acknowledge this health inequality, and require the panel to consider this matter, and to also work in ways appropriate to Māori, and in accordance with the Treaty of Waitangi.


Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historic Abuse in State Care

The Minister for Internal Affairs, Tracey Martin, has put out a media statement indicating circa 500 people have expressed interest in giving evidence into the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historic Abuse in State Care. Fifteen staff are also apparently working with the Commissioner Sir Anand Satyanand in preparatory stages of the inquiry.

Yet what is missing from the media statement is any word on the appointment of other Royal Commission members – which is odd given this is such a significant inquiry, and it was announced over six months ago. That is, to date Māori input on this matter remains at zero – despite the draft terms of reference stating that, “a key focus of the Inquiry is to understand any differential impacts of abuse in state care for Māori”.  Māori tamariki comprise over half of young people in State care, so the Government needs to appoint people to this Inquiry with a strong understanding of Māori care and abuse specific matters; and the sooner the better in our assessment.


 Criminal Justice Sector Reforms – Further Consultation

The Minister of Justice, Andrew Little, has announced that his advisory group for justice sector reforms will now hold a series of regional public consultation meetings. By way of background, this initiative is called, Hāpai i te Ora Tangata / Safe and Effective Justice, and commenced with a large national conference/hui in August. A key theme of the work programme is addressing and reducing Māori rates of criminal offending and reoffending; and as previously advised the working group has four Māori members: Quentin Hix, Tracey McIntosh, Carwyn Jones, and Julia Amua Whaipooti.  The following two articles highlight new data relevant to this policy initiative.
Justice Sector Reforms Public Consultation Meetings.

Date Time Location Venue
29 October 12:30pm – 3:30 pm Timaru Timaru Council Chambers
30 October 9:00am – 12:00pm Christchurch Aranui Library
5 November 1:00pm – 4:30pm Tauranga TBA
6 November 1:00pm – 4:00pm Whangārei Whangārei Central Library
13 November 1:00pm – 4:00pm Tokoroa Tokoroa Public Library
14 November 9:00am – 1:00pm Te Kuiti Te Kuiti Community Room
15 November TBA New Plymouth TBA
17 November 9:00am – 11:00am Palmerston North Palmerston North City Library

Homicide Victims Data Released

Last month the New Zealand Police published a report entitled Police Statistics on Homicide Victims in New Zealand 2007 – 2016: Summary of Statistics about Victims of Murder, Manslaughter, and Infanticide. The report showed between 2007 and 2016, 223 Māori were victims of homicide, which was 33% of all victims (686 in total).  Māori males comprised 22% (154) of all victims and 69% of the total number of Māori victims.  These statistics are a sad over-representation, given Māori comprise only 15% of the total population.

http://www.police.govt.nz/about-us/publication/homicide-victims-report-2017-and-historic-nz-murder-rate-report-1926-2017


Injury Data Released

Last week Statistics New Zealand released injury data. There are two stand-out areas for Māori: injuries from assaults at 37 per 100,000 people, and injuries from motor vehicle accidents at 67 per 100,000.  Both rates   are significantly higher than for non-Māori.  The overall injury data shows a similar rate of non-fatal but serious injuries (and a lower rate of Māori having falls).[1]

https://www.stats.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Serious-injury-outcome-indicators/Serious-injury-outcome-indicators-2000-17/Download-data/serious-injury-outcome-indicators-2000-17.xlsx

[1] Falls are associated more frequently with elderly citizens and there are fewer Māori elderly than others, i.e. a life expectancy disparity of 7 years.  This fact sheet does not probe such matters.

E33 Salient Māori News Items to 28 September 2018

  • On Monday the Crown Minerals (Petroleum) Amendment Bill was introduced in Parliament. This bill amends the Crown Minerals Act 1991 to give effect to the Government’s announcement made in April that the offshore block offers for oil and gas exploration permits will end, effective immediately. The block offer was an annual tender process established by the former National led Government that allowed for oil and gas companies to bid for permits.
    – The Government will continue to honour the 22 active offshore licences, which have permits to explore approximately 100,000 square kilometres of ocean: the final offshore permit will end in 2030
    – Ending offshore oil exploration is a major policy shift for New Zealand and demonstrates action towards the Government’s commitment for a carbon neutral economy by 2050. This included a target for a long-term transition away from fossil fuels and 100% renewable electricity, by 2035. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_80358/crown-minerals-petroleum-amendment-bill
  • On Thursday the third reading of the Electoral (Integrity) Amendment Bill was completed with  63 votes in favour of the bill and 57 against. The purpose of this bill is to prevent a person from remaining in Parliament if they leave the party for which they stood. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_75706/electoral-integrity-amendment-bill
  • Renata Blair (Ngāti Whātua, Tainui) has been selected as a Crown-appointed trustee to the Eden Park Trust Board. The Board is accountable for the financial and strategic management of Eden Park.
  • Sandra Cook (Ngāi Tahu) and Dr Jane Kitson (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Mamoe, Waitaha) have been appointed Guardians of Lakes Manapouri, Monowai and Te Anau. The Guardians’ role is to advise the Minister of Conservation on matters arising from environmental, ecological and social impacts from the power schemes on the three lakes. The Guardians of Lakes Manapouri, Monowai and Te Anau is a statutory body established under the Conservation Act 1987.
  • Robert McGowan, a rongoā Māori expert and promoter of the use of mātauranga Māori in conservation management, has been awarded the Minister of Conservation Loder Cup for outstanding achievements in flora conservation work.
  • Te Ohu Kaimoana group has released its third quarter report for the period 1 April 2018 to 30 June 2018. The report has been published to provide an insight into the work Te Ohu Kaimoana undertakes on behalf of Mandated Iwi Organisations. For the quarter ending 30 June 2018 Te Ohu Kaimoana delivered its services circa $68,000 over budget, however they still expect to distribute a small amount of assets to iwi at end of year.
    https://teohu.maori.nz/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Quarterly-report-June-2018-FINAL-DRAFT-V9.pdf

  • Next Monday voting opens for members of Whakatōhea iwi to choose to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, or alternatively restart the mandating process. Voting ends 26 October. Refer Pānui 13/2018. electionz.com/whakatohea.
  • This week Māori Television staff were advised of a proposed restructure “strategic refresh” which may lead to 19 job losses.
  • This week the Māori Women’s Welfare League National Conference was held in Gisborne.
  • The World Indigenous Business Forum (WIBF) will be held 9 to 11 October 2018 in Rotorua. See http://wibf.ca/about-us/ for registration and programme details.

Salient Māori News Items to E 32 21 September 2018

  • Dr Charlotte Severne (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāi Tūhoe) has been appointed as the new Māori Trustee.
  • Meka Whaitiri was fired on Thursday as a Minister of the Crown by Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern. The decision was made after Prime Minister Ardern received a report into an incident that occurred between Ms Whaitiri and one of her staff on August 27. Ms Whaitiri’s portfolios had included Associate Minister for Crown/Māori Relations along with Minister of Customs, Associate Minister of Agriculture, Associate Minister of Forestry and Associate Minister of Local Government.  Ms Whaitiri will remain as the Member of Parliament for Ikaroa Rawhiti.
  • This week a reporter on mainstream radio, Heather du Plessis-Allan, when commenting on Prime Minister Ardern’s visit to Nauru for the Pacific Island Forum, advised listeners that the nation was a “hell hole” and that the Pacific Islands “are nothing but leeches on us”. When challenged about the inappropriateness of this comment, she sought to clarify that she was referring to the Governments of Pacific Islands, not the people.  In our assessment, Ms du Plessis-Allan’s comments about Nauru and its economic exchange with New Zealand is almost certainty factually wrong, given it was New Zealand and Australia that largely consumed the island’s phosphate resources for agricultural production purposes, without sufficient recompense.  e. the amount of a half pence per ton in 1921, being raised to one and a half pence in 1927 does have strong parallels with early purchases of Māori land, and extreme lowball prices being paid for resources due to uneven negotiation frameworks being set into motion.[1]  Unfortunately for Pasifika peoples, however, there is no equivalent of a Waitangi Tribunal for Nauruan people to raise this matter with the New Zealand Government now, nor for others such as Samoan people to raise issues of historic incidents of New Zealand Police brutality, etc.  Given du Plessis-Allan’s comments, then perhaps there should be a parallel Pasifika Commission of Inquiry to address such matters to clarify how New Zealand has used Pasifika Islands for resources, labour, defence, and other purposes.  Moreover, however, along with the ill-formed and offensive comments about other Pasifika nations, we consider Ms du Plessis-Allan also makes an incorrect assumption that New Zealand is not a Pasifika nation in and of itself; i.e. her statement indicates no acknowledgement that Aotearoa is the south edge of Pasifika and that Māori are part of Polynesia.
  • This week celebrations of the Women’s Suffrage Movement have been held, as it is 125 years since New Zealand women won the right to vote – i.e. 19 September 1893. Accordingly, from then Māori women were able to vote for Māori men who were standing for election in one of the four Māori Parliamentary seats, established earlier in 1876.  In 1919 women won the right to stand for Parliament in New Zealand, and the first Māori wahine to attempt to do so was Rehutai Maihi, in 1935.  In 1949, following the death of her husband, Potiki Ratana, Iriaka Ratana became the first Māori woman to succeed at winning a seat in Parliament.  Later, in 1972, Whetu Tirikatene became the first wahine Māori member of Cabinet.  The first wahine Māori Prime Minister is yet to be determined.
  • This week the Government’s tax working group has released an interim report. We are reviewing this for implications for Māori, in particular Māori land tax issues, etc.
  • Ngāi Tahu Tourism has announced that it is adjusting wages to ensure all staff are paid at least the living wage of $20.55 per hour.
  • The Māori Carbon Foundation has selected Donna Awatere Huata as their first Māori Climate Commissioner. The role is designed to facilitate opportunities for Māori to learn about climate change.    Ms Awatere Huata has a controversial past, including being convicted and jailed for fraud in 2005.  (Equally she has a history as a Māori rights activist, a writer,  and as a former Member of Parliament.)
  • On Wednesday the Equal Pay Amendment Bill was introduced in Parliament. The purpose of this bill is to improve the process for raising and progressing pay equity claims, and to eliminate gender discrimination in the areas of remuneration and employment terms and conditions for work done within female dominated jobs. We note this bill should have a positive effect for Māori as wāhine Māori are, collectively, one of the lowest paid groupings within the workforce.

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_80319/equal-pay-amendment-bill

[1] This is the amount the British Phosphate Commissioners paid; the New Zealand Government was a part of this board.

E31 Salient Māori News Summary for the Week Ending 14 September 2018

  • Colleen Neville (Ngāti Maniapoto) and Kauahi Ngapora (Ngāi Tahu, Waikato-Tainui) have been appointed as members of the Tourism New Zealand Board.
  • On Tuesday the second reading of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill was completed in Parliament. This bill seeks to reduce domestic violence through introducing cross agency information sharing provisions, increasing access to risk assessments services, and recording family violence offending more accurately within justice sector agencies. Māori whānau experience higher levels of domestic violence than others (Pānui 23/2014 refers).
  • Next week the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little will hold three public hui with members of Ngāpuhi in Australia. The purpose of the hui is to progress Treaty settlement discussions. It is estimated that circa 25,000 Ngāpuhi live in Australia.
Sydney 22 September 12:00 – 2:00pm Te Wairua Tapu Wharekarakia, Redfern, Sydney
Brisbane 22 September 6:30 – 8:30pm Pullman Brisbane Airport Hotel, Brisbane
Perth 23 September 2:30 – 4:30pm Ken Jackman Hall, Darius Wells Library, Kwinana, Perth

https://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngapuhi/

  • Associate Professor Leonie Pihama (Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Māhanga, Ngā Māhanga a Tairi) has received Endeavour Research Programme funding of circa $2.16 million over 4 years for her study, He Waka Eke Noa: Maori Cultural Frameworks for Violence Prevention and Intervention Research.
  • Dr Farrar Palmer (Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto) has received $250,000 from Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga for her research study which explores mātauranga and tikanga Māori in sporting contexts, Manawa Te Taonga Tuku Iho.
  • On Monday to celebrate Te Wiki Te Reo Māori three newspapers which are published for the Whanganui and South Taranaki communities commenced print with “h” being added to Whanganui. In November 2015 the Local Government Act 2002 was amended to reflect the spelling of the district of Whanganui. The decision recognised that ‘Wanganui’ has no meaning in Te Reo Māori.  It also ensured the district name was consistent with the official names of the river and the town.
  • On Tuesday Te Tumu Paeroa launched Taikura Nuku, a modelling service used to identify the productivity potential of Māori land.
  • On Thursday Trans-Tasman Resources Limited announced they will appeal the High Court decision quashing its consent to mine iron sand offshore from the South Taranaki seabed. Pānui E29/2018 refers.

Salient Māori News Items to 7 September 2018: E30

  • Katrina Bryant and Kiri Parata have respectively been awarded health research grants (from the Health Research Council).  Ms Bryant has been granted $181,000 to develop a ‘Falls prevention exercise programme for Māori’. Ms Parata has been granted $199,000 for her project, ‘Whāia te Manaaki: manaakitanga and hauora for Te Atiawa ki Whakarongotai’.
  • Rachael Tuwhanga (Tainui, Waikato-Maniapoto) has been appointed to the Education New Zealand Board
  • In the lead up to Māori Language Week next week a number of articles relating to the use of Te Reo are presenting within the media, including:
    • Simon Bridges stating that Te Reo should not be compulsory within the education sector;
    • Shane Jones stating that Simon Bridges has no mandate to speak on matters relating to Te Reo, and that he should perhaps learn about Māori policy from Nuk Kōrako;
    • Nuk Kōrako stating that it was the National Government that improved Māori language legislation in 2016 and that the present Government needed to get a move on with its work in this area;
    • Nanaia Mahuta welcoming 300-odd (not released) submissions on the proposed Government strategy noting the diversity of views and indicating the strategy was moving along; and amongst those politics,
    • a call for mainstream broadcasters to be required to pronounce Māori words correctly when on air (i.e. making poor articulation of Te Reo a grounds for complaint under New Zealand broadcasting standards).
  • This week the New Zealand Police confirmed they will not pursue a complaint laid by Graham McCready against Meka Whaitiri, a Minister outside of Cabinet. Mr McCready tried to lay an assault complaint following media reports of an altercation occurring between Ms Whaitiri and a staff member. Ms Whaitiri has presently stood down from her ministerial duties while an investigation is being carried out by Ministerial Services.[1]   Ms Whaitiri is the Member of Parliament for Ikaroa Rawhiti.[2]
  • On Tuesday Wallace Te Ahuru pleaded guilty in the Manukau District Court to two charges of ‘Obtaining by deception’ and seven charges of ‘Using forged documents’ in relation to the Waitangi National Trust. The charges follow an investigation by the Serious Fraud Office. Mr Te Ahuru defrauded the Trust of circa $1.2 million during the time he was employed as the Trust’s Corporate Services Manager (2012 to 2017). Mr Te Ahuru was remanded in custody and will reappear in the Manukau District Court for sentencing on November 30.
  • This week relieving Deputy Commissioner of Police, Andrew Coster, confirmed that two formal complaints have been received by police over alleged bullying by Deputy Commissioner Wally Haumaha.  Mr Haumaha has been the subject of the Government Inquiry into the Appointment Process for a Deputy Commissioner of Police. We also note on Wednesday Mareikura Collier, a former police chaplain, commenced a hunger strike in support of Deputy Police Commissioner Wally Haumaha.
  • On Wednesday the Māori Party announced the resignation of Marama Fox as the co-leader of the party.
  • Four wāhine Māori projects successfully secured funding to celebrate the 125-year anniversary of the New Zealand suffrage movement. The projects are:
    • Mana Wāhine Whakatāne $10,727 (Whakatāne);
    • Pūrākau Hākui $10,000 (Manawātu);
    • Tino Rangatiratanga Wahine $12,500 (Wellington);
    • Taihoa e hoa: Natives be Woke $8,327 (Otago).

[1] Ms Whaitiri’s portfolios include Minister of Customs, Associate Minister of Agriculture, Associate Minister for Crown Māori Relations, Associate Minister of Forestry and Associate Minister of Local Government

[2] It is reported Ms Whaitiri offered to stand down, and that offer was accepted by the Prime Minister – although in reality it seems reasonable to conclude in these circumstances that Ms Whaitiri was or would have been required to stand down anyway during the investigation period.

Maori news for the week ending 31 August 2018

  • Leith Comer (Ngāti Rangitihi, Ngai Tahu, Ngāti Pahuwera, Te Arawa) and Fiona Cassidy (Ngāti Kuri, Te Aupouri, Te Rarawa) have been appointed to the Veterans Advisory Board. Mr Comer will chair the board.
  • Marama Fox, a former Member of Parliament for the Māori Party, had her consultancy company liquidated this week over an unpaid debt, reportedly of circa $30,000 to an ICT company. Associate Judge Ken Johnston of the Wellington High Court made the liquidation order against Marama Fox Consultancy Group Tapui Limited.
  • Applications for the Te Pūtake o te Riri | Wars and Conflicts in New Zealand Fund are now being accepted. Te Pūtake o te Riri is a fund which supports whānau, hapū and iwi to initiate, promote and deliver activities and events that commemorate the New Zealand Land Wars. https://tpk.govt.nz/en/whakamahia/te-putake-o-te-riri-wars-and-conflicts-in-new-zeal
  • Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho – A Māori Cultural and Intellectual Property Issues Conference will be held 16 -18 September in Nelson. For programme details see weblink below.

    https://www.taongatukuiho.com/On Thursday the Minister of Education Chris Hipkins announced that Te Wharekura o Ngāti Rongomai, (Rotorua) will receive $10 million for new buildings.

  • Today the Minister of Education Chris Hipkins announced the cancellation of the integration agreement for Hato Petera College, effective immediately. This decision will come as no surprise to readers.
  • On Tuesday the Associate Minister of Education, Kelvin Davis, announced that a series of over twenty hui are being held across the country to discuss ways to improve Māori education. As these wānanga have commenced the Minister’s release is tardy; but the intent to ensure a wide range of input is received is positive.  We recommend subscribers with an interest in Māori education matters attend; as it is time now for the Government to review its Māori education strategy, Ka Hikitia.  (Note presently the strategy for 2018 onwards contains only three dot-points and is predominately a blank white page.)

    Ministry of Education Māori Education Wānanga

     

    Location

    Date and Time  

    Venue

    Lower Hutt 4 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Lower Hutt Events Centre, Lower Hutt
    Opotiki 5 September 2018

    10:00am – 2:00pm

    Opotiki College, Opotiki
    Masterton 6 September 2018,

    TBA

    Copthorne Hotel, Masterton
    New Plymouth 11 September 2018

    2:00 – 4:00pm

    Quality Hotel, New Plymouth
    Te Kuiti 11 September 2018

    TBA

    Waikato, TBA
    Whangānui 11 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Hawera/ Manawatu- Whangānui, TBA
    Coromandel 12 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Manaia/Coromandel, TBA
    Whangānui 12 September 2018

    2:00 – 4:00pm

    Cooks Gardens, Whangānui
    Whangānui 12 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Cooks Gardens, Whangānui
    Gisborne 13 September 2018

    10:30am – 2:00pm

    Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Gisborne
    Hamilton 13 September 2018

    TBA

    Waikato, TBA
    Ruatoria 14 September 2018

    10:30am – 2:00pm

    Ngata Memorial College, Ruatora
    Palmerston North 14 September 2018

    2:00pm – 4:00pm

    Distinction Hotel, Palmerston North
    Palmerston North 14 September 2018

    6:00 – 9:00pm

    Distinction Hotel, Palmerston North
    Whangārei 17 September 2018

    12:00 – 4:00pm

    ASB Stadium, Whangārei
    Kaitaia 18 September 2018

    10:00am – 2:00pm

    Te Ahu Centre, Kaitaia, Northland
    Keri Keri 19 September 2018

    10:00am – 2:00pm

    Turners Centre, Keri Keri, Northland
    Auckland 22 September 2018

    TBA

    Alexandra Park, Auckland
    South Auckland 24 September 2018

    TBA

    Vodafone Events Centre, South Auckland
    North Auckland 25 September 2018

    TBA

    North Shore Stadium, North Auckland
    Hastings 27 September 2018

    4:30 – 8:30pm

    Heretaunga Taiwhenua, Hastings
    Southland 9 October 2018

    TBA

    Southland, TBA
    Chatham Island 10 October 2018

    TBA

    Chatham Island, TBA

     

     

Parliamentary Matters E29 31 August 2018

  • Yesterday Meka Whaitiri, a Minister outside of Cabinet, was stood down from her ministerial duties while an investigation is carried out into a staffing matter. There are media reports of an altercation occurring, allegedly leading to a person being pushed out a door.  The investigation is being undertaken by Ministerial Services.   Ms Whaitiri’s portfolios include Minister of Customs, Associate Minister of Agriculture, Associate Minister for Crown Māori Relations, Associate Minister of Forestry and Associate Minister of Local Government.  Ms Whaitiri is the Member of Parliament for Ikaroa Rawhiti.[1]

[1] It is reported Ms Whaitiri offered to stand down, and that offer was accepted by the Prime Minister – although in reality it seems reasonable to conclude in these circumstances that Ms Whaitiri was or would have been required to stand down anyway during the investigation period.

Salient Māori News Items to 24 August E/28 2018

  • Quentin Hix (Ngāi Tahu), Dr Carwyn Jones (Ngāti Kahungunu), Tracey McIntosh (Ngāi Tūhoe) and Julia Amua Whaipooti (Ngāti Porou) have been appointed to the Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora Justice Advisory Group. The purpose of Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora is:

-to engage the public in a conversation about what they want from the criminal justice system; and

– to canvas a range of ideas on how the criminal justice system can be improved.

  • Chief Judge Isaac (Ngāi Tūhoe, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahungunu), Sir Sidney (Hirini) Moko Mead (Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāi Tūhoe, Tūhourangi), Professor Rawinia Higgins (Ngāi Tūhoe) and Dr Grant Phillipson have been reappointed to the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • On Monday Te Ururoa Flavell commenced his role as chief executive of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.
  • Last Friday the Associate Minister of Education, Kelvin Davis, announced that Te Wharekura o Ngā Purapura o Te Aroha and Palmerston North Manukura will receive significant funding to expand their facilities. Manukura special character school will receive $20 million for a new permanent building: they currently lease a building on the Massey University Campus. Te Wharekura o Ngā Purapura o Te Aroha will receive $10 million towards building expansion.
  • Last Sunday the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Andrew Little, announced funding support for Ngāpuhi hapū, to hui to assist progress in Treaty settlement discussions. The funding value is reportedly $290,000. This is a useful indicator in that it shows discussions on resolving the settlement disputes are now progressing out to wider iwi members.

E27 Salient Māori News Items to 17 August 2018

  • From today to next Tuesday Koroneihana celebrations will commence at Tūrangawaewae Marae, to celebrate the 160th anniversary of the Kīngitanga movement, and the12th anniversary of the coronation of Kīngi Tūheitia. However, unlike past years, media are banned from the event.  This is said to be in relation to the article above, around allegations concerning Te Ururangi Trust, which could be a media distraction from the positivity of the celebrations.
  • On Monday 80 University of Waikato students and staff protested against a proposed restructure which would remove the Māori and Indigenous Studies faculty status and integrate it as part of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. A final decision regarding the restructure will be published in early September.
  • On Tuesday Wallace Tamamotu Te Ahuru appeared in the Manukau District Court to face two charges of ‘Obtaining by deception’ and seven charges of ‘Using forged documents’. The charges follow an investigation from the Serious Fraud Office. Mr Te Ahuru is alleged to have defrauded the Waitangi National Trust of circa $1.2 million during the time he was employed as the Trust’s Corporate Services Manager (2012 to 2017). Mr Te Ahuru has been remanded on bail and will reappear in the Manukau District Court on 4 September.
  • This week Te Matapihi hosted a Māori housing finance wānanga. The focus of the wānanga is to identify solutions to increase access to finance when building housing on Māori Land.

E26 Salient Māori News Items to 10 August 2018

  • Pierre Henare (Ngāti Porou), Lisa Chase and Raewyn Tipene have been appointed to the board of the New Zealand Walking Access Commission.
  • Today Tiniraka Victoria Clark (Tainui) was sworn in as a District Court Judge with a jury warrant.
  • On Thursday 40 unionised Māori Television employees held a strike for a 24-hour period. The employees have been dissatisfied with ongoing negotiations for improved pay and conditions of work.
  • Te Puni Kōkiri has partnered with Skylight Trust to deliver a web series on rangatahi suicide prevention. The series of seven videos are personal stories from rangatahi and their stories of resilience as they work through living with depression, anxiety and suicidal feelings. The videos can be viewed on the Te Puni Kōkiri website. https://www.tpk.govt.nz/en/whakamahia/rangatahi-suicide-prevention
  • This week Tukoroirangi Morgan announced his intention to resign from the Waikato River Authority in November pending a replacement appointee from Waikato-Tainui.

Salient Māori News Items for the period ending 27 July 2018

  • Dr Pauline Kingi CMNZ (Ngāti Whāwhākia, Ngāti Mahuta, Ngāti Pikiao, Te Arawa, Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Maniapoto) has been appointed the lead for the Government Inquiry into the Appointment Process for A Deputy Commissioner of Police.
  • Steven Tipene Wilson (Ngāti Koroki Kahukura, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāti Tura, Ngāti Te Ngākau) has been appointed deputy chair of the Environmental Protection Agency and Dayle Hunia (Ngāti Awa) has been appointed a Director.
  • Pauline Winter QSO (Te Atiawa Taranaki) and Sir John Clarke CNZM (Ngāti Porou, Ngāpuhi) have been appointed to the recruitment panel for the roles Chief Human Rights Commissioner, Race Relations Commissioner and Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner. Ms Winter will chair the three-person panel.
  • Rukumoana Schaafhausen (Ngāti Haua) has been appointed a Director of the Crown research entity AgResearch.
  • The Minister for Seniors, Tracey Martin, has released a discussion document and opened consultations for a new positive ageing strategy. The document notes the projected growth of Māori aged 65+ years from 43,000 in 2016 to 118,000 by 2036. Submissions and public consultations close 24 August 2018, and a draft strategy and action plan will be released in early 2019.

http://www.superseniors.msd.govt.nz/documents/ageing-population-consultation/ageing-population-discussion-document-web.pdf

  • Applications are now open for the Children and Families Research Fund. The purpose of this fund is to support social policy research evolving from the Growing Up in New Zealand longitudinal study. The Ministry of Social Development manage the fund and will award up to $750,000 in total.  Applications close 31 August.

http://www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/work-programmes/research/children-families-research/children-and-families-research-fund-20182019-funding-round.html

  • Last week the Director General of Health published the Health and Independence 2017 report. This report presents an overview of the health of New Zealanders drawing on a range of sources. In short Māori health continues to be poorer than non – Māori with life expectancy for Māori males born from 2012–2014 being 7.3 years below that of non-Māori males born over the same period. For Māori females in this age group, life expectancy is 6.8 years shorter than non – Māori females.

https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/health-and-independence-report_2017_0.pdf

  • In late June the Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, announced that tertiary level 1 and 2 Te Reo Māori programmes will receive a funding increase of $1,000 per full time equivalent place (EFTS). This means funding will increase from $6,500 to $7,500 per EFTS. Funding changes will take effect in 2019. Quite why Te Reo Māori is funded at $500 less than English as a Second Language was not announced, and is a matter we intend to investigate further in our reviews of tertiary education policy and Government Te Reo Māori strategies.
  • Earlier this month Margaret Dixon was sentenced in the Auckland District Court to 12 months’ home detention and ordered to pay $5,000 in reparation for defrauding the Parengarenga 3G Trust of $935,000. In May Ms Dixon pleaded guilty to three charges of ‘theft by person in special relationship’ under the Crimes Act.
  • Last week Hemo Kerewai Thompson, former finance manager of Raukura Waikato Social Services Trust (RWSS), was sentenced to two years and five months’ imprisonment for 166 charges of ‘theft in a special relationship’. Ms Thompson defrauded RWSS of circa $175,000. The offending took place over a four year period from November 2010 to February 2015. RWSS is currently in liquidation.
  • An inquiry into the appointment of Deputy Commissioner of Police Wallace Haumaha will commence on August 6. The inquiry follows criticism of Mr Haumaha’s appointment from Louise Nicholas, who is an advocate for the rights of women who have been victims of sexual violence. Ms Nicholas believes the appointment was inappropriate as Mr Haumaha had publicly shown support for two former policemen who were accused and convicted of rape in the 1980s. The scope of the inquiry will consider if the process that led to Mr Haumaha’s appointment was adequate.  The inquiry will not consider whether Mr Haumaha is a suitable candidate for the role

http://www.dia.govt.nz/Government-Inquiry-Into-the-Appointment-Process-for-a-Deputy-Commissioner-of-Police.

Appointments and Awards and salient Māori News Items for the Week to 29 June 2018

  • Farah Palmer (Ngāti Mahuta) has been appointed to the Board of Sport New Zealand.
  • Professor Rawinia Higgins (Ngāi Tūhoe) has been appointed Chair of Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori / the Māori Language Commission.
  • Oliver Tapiki-Thorpe (Whakatōhea) has received the New Zealand Youth Award for Inclusion and Diversity.
  • On Wednesday Daniel Michael Bidois (Ngāti Maniapoto) swore his Oath of Allegiance in Parliament. Mr Bidois became the newest National Party Member of Parliament after winning the Northcote By-Election on 9 June.
  • Māori food company Kaitahi was awarded the “Most Innovative Foodservice Product” at the Fine Food New Zealand Innovation Awards.  Kaitahi has developed frozen food products using traditional Māori ingredients.
  • Te Arawa Group Holdings, Rotomā No 1 Incorporation, and Ngāti Awa Group Holdings have formed a business entity partnership called Matai Pacific Iwi Collective. The partnership has purchased three large kiwifruit orchards in the Te Puke region, the orchards are planted in Green and Gold varieties of Kiwifruit.
  • A grouping of 13 Māori businesses (the Hui Māori Collective), will be launching an e-commence portal on Tmall Global in November. (Tmall, a mandarin language site, is part of the Alibaba group and a major international trading site.)   The collective is also working with AsureQuality to develop a quality assurance framework for branding and product authenticity purposes.  Members of the Hui Māori Collective are: Miraka, Kai Ora Honey, Mana Kai Honey, Tai Tokerau Honey, The True Honey Company, Tuku Māori Winemakers Collective (Steve Bird Wines, Te Pā wines, Tiki Wines, Ostler Wines and Kurukuru Wines), Taha Beverages, Kono, and The Modern Māori Quartet.
  • The High Court has ruled in favour of a rent increase for the Waiotapu Thermal Wonderland; meaning the leasee, Te Arawa Group holdings, will need to pay the owner, Ngāti Tahi Ngāti Whaoa Rūnanga Trust, increases backdated for three years, and court costs. This ends a three-year rental dispute between the two parties.
  • Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori and Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga have signed a ‘Mahi Tahi’ agreement to promote and revitalise Te Reo Māori.
  • On Saturday a launch will be held for He Kupu Tuku Iho, a new Te Reo book authored by Sir Tīmoti Kāretu and Wharehuia Milroy. The book is said to be written for the ‘serious’ Te Reo student.  Auckland University Press are the publishers