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Māori Media Items of Interest week ending 29 March 2019

  • On Tuesday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, announced that the Lemuel Te Urupu Whānau Trust of Raupunga will receive investment funding of $1.2 million to construct five papakāinga houses.
  • This week hearings for the Wai 2660 Marine and Coastal Area Act  Inquiry were held in Wellington. This Inquiry addresses two main questions:
    • To what extent, if at all, are the MACA Act and Crown policy and practice inconsistent with the Treaty in protecting the ability of Māori holders of customary marine and coastal area rights to assert and exercise those rights? And;
    • Do the procedural arrangements and resources provided by the Crown under the MACA Act prejudicially affect Māori holders of customary marine and coastal area rights in Treaty terms when they seek recognition of their rights?
  • Ngāi Tahu Property, Queenstown Lakes District Council and KiwiBuild have partnered to build a community of 300+ homes in Queenstown. The first homes are expected to be completed in 2022.
  • On Thursday the Hastings District Council (HDC) voted ten to four in favour of appointing non-elected members of its Māori Joint Committee to the council’s other standing committees. The appointees will have full voting rights.
  • Kristy Maria Roa, (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura), Tumoanakotore-i-Whakairioratia Harrison-Boyd, (Ngati Porou) and Taane-nui-a-Rangi Rotoatara Hubbard (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Pahauwera, Tainui, Ngāti Pakapaka, Ngāi Tahu, Ngāi Tūhoe) have been named finalist for the 2019 Ahuwhenua Young Māori Farmer Award. The winner will be announced on 24 May.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 1 March 2019

  • Last week the biennial Te Matatini competition was held in Te Whānganui-a-Tara (Wellington). The winners were Ngā Tūmanako.  Te Pikikōtuku o Ngāti Rongomai gained second place, and Te Kapa Haka o Te Whānau a Apanui gained third place.
  • This week Te Puni Kōkiri belatedly released the Cabinet paper associated with the new Government Māori Language Strategy (Pānui 5/2019 refers). In the main the paper confirms Cabinet commitment to the strategy, and we note a couple of points of interest:
    • An implementation plan is being developed: it is linked to a Budget bid this year, with a goal being to get Cabinet support for the operational activities in August. This is good, as the strategy needs resourcing to have any real impact, as per our earlier review comments.
    • The Minister notes there was a campaign against the strategy via the online consultation: ultimately 45% of the 2,000- odd submissions were negative. In our view this reinforces our observation that online consultation alone is an inappropriate means to gather Māori (and other) input – hui should have been held.  We note the same operational error is now occurring for the Māori media review, which has no public hui scheduled. (Pānui 4/2019 refers).
  • On Monday the Wellington District Court imposed fines totalling circa $1.1 million on the Directors of Hawkes Bay Seafoods, the company itself, plus a related company and key staff. The directors were Antonino “Nino” Giovanni D’Esposito, Giancarlo “Joe” Harold D’Esposito and manager Marcus Giuseppe D’Esposito. In addition, the company must pay more than $400,000 for the return of its forfeited vessels.
    By way of background the offending was identified in 2014, and after years of defensive wrangling, the grouping finally pleaded guilty in 2018 to 131 charges for selling unreported catch.   We further advise that the key proprietor of Hawkes Bay Seafoods, Antonio D’Esposito, already had at least 98 fishing convictions – which shows a history of ongoing offending in this sector.  (In 1997, he/his company was also required to pay nearly a million dollars in fines for fishing offences.)
    This present case matters for Māori because Hawkes Bay Seafoods is the inshore fishing quota leasee for Ngāti Kahungunu – i.e. it catches the inshore settlement quota of the iwi (and for some other iwi).   That is, its business is based on a significant Crown / Māori Treaty of Waitangi settlement; and in our view its misuse tarnishes the Treaty settlement process.  Put simply, why should/would the Crown provide ongoing settlement redress via quota if fishing rights allocated to iwi are going to be misused and put fish stocks at risk?
    Further, although the proceedings against this group commenced in 2014,  there were other investigations involving Hawkes Bay Seafoods in 2015 relating to people (staff) involved in a paua and crayfish black market.  However, Ngāti Kahungunu has stoically continued its partnership with this company and never openly condemned Hawkes Bay Seafoods for its illegal fishing practices.  Rather, in 2017 Ngāti Kahungunu extended the partnership with a joint venture in purchasing an off-shore fishing boat in a 50:50 arrangement with Hawkes Bay Seafoods (again to fish the iwi Treaty settlement quota).   In our assessment, despite the seriousness of the fishing offending by Hawkes Bay Seafoods, Ngāti Kahungunu presents as having been undeterred in its business dealings with the company.
    However, following the outcome of this most recent case, Ngāti Kahungunu has now expressed a desire to purchase outright Hawkes Bay Seafoods, and is actively taking steps to achieve that.  That may be a positive outcome for the iwi – and if successful it may mean that Ngāti Kahungunu is fishing its own quota, and then also processing and selling those fish itself (plus employing iwi members along each link in the chain).  However, there is some suggestion in the media that Antonino D’Esposito desires to continue on as a consulting advisor.  If so it is difficult to see the value in that; as given the convictions it is possible further association with him would tarnish the fishing brand (‘Takitimu’) that Ngāti Kahungunu is seeking to establish to recover the situation.
    Note for absolutely clarity there is no suggestion that Ngāti Kahungunu has ever been involved in any type of illegal fishing practices.   The convicted offending discussed herein relates to a company that the iwi has a partnership relationship with.
  • The Government’s Welfare Expert Advisory Group has now reportedly submitted their advice to Government.  We note the terms of reference for this group (set last June) was somewhat vague, with its role being to ‘provide advice to the Government on options that could best give effect to its vision for the future direction of the social welfare system’.  Notwithstanding, the Minister for Social Development, Carmel Sepuloni, has referred to this work as an ‘overhaul of the welfare system’.  Accordingly, we expect the report to have significant implications for Māori, particularly for the 109,000 tangata Māori – and their whānau members – who are reliant on one of the three main benefits.[1]  Minister Sepuloni has indicated the report will be released publicly later this month, or in early April.   We will advise further at that time.
  • Statistics NZ has released its working document on how to measure child poverty; Measuring child poverty: Concepts and definitions’. By way of background, the Government’s Child Poverty Reduction Act was in introduced in 2018 to help reduce child poverty in New Zealand – Pānui 8/2018 outlines this policy shift. The new Act now requires Government to set three-year and ten-year targets on four primary measures, and for the Government Statistician to report annually on ten measures of child poverty.  The working paper sets out the technical approaches to be used.  In addition, three further supporting papers explaining the rationales for statistical and data choices have been released.  We have undertaken a summary review of these papers and found nothing untoward: i.e. the measures being used are appropriate, and present as thoughtfully designed.  Māori child poverty information is expected to be presented through this work as well – which in part is a result of submissions made by Māori for this to be included.  We will advise further once the first data sets are released.  The working documentation is available here:  https://www.stats.govt.nz/methods/measuring-child-poverty-concepts-and-definitions
  • The Labour Party has declined an application from John Tamihere to re-join the party. Mr Tamihere is a former Cabinet Minister, and amongst other portfolios was an Associate Minister of Māori Affairs (2002-2004).  Mr Tamihere advises the Party’s council gave no reason for the decline, and indicates that the process presents as unfair, because there was no discussion on why he was declined, nor is there any right of appeal.  Mr Tamihere has noted that this action is likely to be because he has announced his intention to seek the role of Auckland Mayor in upcoming elections, although previously the Labour Party endorsed the current Mayor, Phil Goff.   (Mr Goff will announce shortly whether he intends to stand for re-election.)   The Labour Party’s constitution allows the Party to only endorse one candidate for the mayoralty – meaning if Mr Tamihere had been accepted as a member he could have sought that endorsement ahead of Mr Goff.
  • Last Friday the Minister of Agriculture, Damien O´Connor, announced the 2019 Ahuwhenua Trophy finalists for Māori sheep and beef farming. The finalists are: Whangara Farms (Gisborne); Te Awahohonu Forest Trust / Gwavas Station (Hawkes Bay); and Kiriroa Station (Gisborne).  The winner will be announced on 24 May at the 2019 Ahuwhenua Awards ceremony, to be held in Gisborne.
  • Last Friday the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Andrew Little, announced the Crown’s response to the voting results for the Whakatōhea Settlement Process. In our view the response is essentially to proceed slowly with caution, and to check with officials whether any negotiations can carry on safely and or appropriately now; possibly concurrently with a Waitangi Tribunal hearing.
    By way of background, the mandate of Whakatōhea Pre-settlement Claims Trust to settle historic claims was tested via urgent Waitangi Tribunal hearing claims in 2017.  The Tribunal’s primary finding was that the Crown prioritised its objective of concluding Treaty settlements over a process that was fair to Whakatōhea. The Tribunal found the decision to recognise the Pre-settlement Trust mandate was therefore not fair, reasonable, or made in good faith, and breaches the Treaty principle of partnership.
    To resolve this, in October 2018 Whakatōhea iwi members were asked to vote on the following: 1) continuing with the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claim Trust as their treaty settlement entity; 2a) stop current Treaty negotiations in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start?  And 2b) stop current Treaty negotiations in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea?
    The results that came out in November 2018 show a small majority (56%) of iwi voted to continue negotiations with the Crown via the existing entity, but conversely a large majority (73%) voted to also stop negotiations until the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry.  It is this somewhat contradictory outcome that Minister Little is seeking to address i.e. carrying on working with the current settlement entity, but not getting ahead / or out of step with Tribunal processes that iwi members have stated they desire to occur first.

 

[1] Namely, jobseeker support (i.e. unemployment), sole parent support, and supported living.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 22 February 2019

 

  • Last Friday the Minister for Land Information, Eugenie Sage, announced her decision that Tūranganui-a-Kiwa / Poverty Bay was now the official name for what was formally called – in legal contexts – Poverty Bay.
  • Last week the Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson, with the Minister of Conservation, Eugenie Sage, announced the launch of ‘Ka Hao te Rangatahi’. This is a new training programme based in Ruatoria, focused on developing conservation skills and erosion management for youth who are not in employment, education or training.
  • A Waitangi Tribunal hearing commenced this week concerning Wai 2573, which is ‘the Mana Ahuriri Deed of Settlement (Ngāti Pārau) claim’. Ngāti Pārau claimants are challenging the mandate of the Mana Ahuriri post settlement governance entity, on the basis that due processes were not followed in the enacting of this settlement.
  • Last Friday Ngāti Paoa negotiators signed the Hauraki Collective deed of settlement – despite opposition from within the Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust. This means six of the twelve Hauraki iwi have now agreed to the collective deed of settlement. (The Pare Hauraki Collective redress includes a settlement worth circa $250 million in total, the return of two Maunga Moehau and Te Aroha, along with 25,000 hectares of commercial forests. The collective consists of twelve Hauraki iwi: Hako; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki; Ngāti Hei; Ngāti Maru; Ngāti Paoa; Ngāti Porou ki Hauraki; Ngāti Pūkenga; Ngāti Rāhiri Tumutumu; Ngāti Tamaterā; Ngāti Tara Tokanui; Ngaati Whanaunga; and Te Patukirikiri.    There has been significant opposition to various aspects of this broader settlement process, including from Ngāi Te Rangi iwi members who are opposed to Hauraki iwi being represented on a Tauranga Moana governance group, and from Ngāti Whātua who opposed Ngāti Paoa being offered property in central Auckland.)

E43 7 December 2018: Maori News Items

  • Last Saturday the Otamataha Trust received an apology from the New Zealand Church Missionary Society for historical grievances against Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho. By way of background, in 2014 The New Zealand Mission Trust Board (Otamataha) Empowering Act was passed. This Act transferred land in Tauranga and some other property from the New Zealand Mission Trust Board to the Otamataha Trust. The New Zealand Mission Trust Board had held parcels of land in trust since 1896, (land which had previously been acquired by the Anglican Church Mission Society from Māori owners in 1838). The beneficiaries of the Otamataha Trust are the hapū of Ngāti Tapu and Ngai Tamarāwaho, and their members (i.e. descendants of the original Māori land owners).
  • On Monday the Court of Appeal in Wellington ruled in favour of the Enterprise Miramar Peninsula Incorporated group and quashed the resource consent granted to the Wellington Company by the Wellington City Council for a major housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay. The Port Nicholson Settlement Trust has been working in partnership with the Wellington Company and part of the development was to be built on the Trust’s land. In August a group of Taranaki Whānui members, called Mau Whenua, protested the proposed development. The group were seeking a public inquiry into deals done between the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust and the Wellington Company.  The group believe the development is not in the best interests of the iwi, and that the trustees may have breached a clause within their trust deed requiring 75% iwi consent for a major transaction.  The Court of Appeal ruling means a new resource consent process is required (and the Court advises the City Council may need to use an independent person for this).  This action will likely please those members of the iwi who are against the development.   We also note the annual accounts for this iwi are not available for public viewing this year.
  • On Tuesday the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill was introduced in Parliament. If passed into law this bill will empower Te Rūnganga o Ngāi Tahu (TRoNT) to appoint up to 2 members to the Canterbury Regional Council, after the 2019 local body elections.
  • This week mainstream media has been reporting on the Nelson Christmas Parade (held last Sunday) which had for the first time a non-traditionally dressed Santa. Instead Santa was Māori, without a beard and dressed in a short-sleeved shirt, and red korowai. The Māori Santa also held a large hei matu (fish hook) designed sceptre. Public opinion on the Māori Santa has been mixed.
  • This week the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council (HBRC) held public consultation regarding a proposal to sell up to 45% of the Port of Napier (currently the port is wholly owned by the Council’s investment company). Local Hawke’s Bay iwi, Ngāti Pahauwera, has noted that given much of the land for the port was taken from Māori under the Napier Harbour Board Act, the iwi seeks access to the shares at a reduced rate from the council.   The regional council (so far) has not expressed interest in negotiating on this matter with Ngāti Pahauwera.
  • Today the report by the Tomorrow’s Schools Independent Taskforce was published. We will review this report entitled Our Schooling Futures: Stronger Together Whiria Ngā Kura Tūātinitini in our next edition of Pānui E44 14 December 2018.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week ending 30 November 2018

  • Ruakere Hond (Taranaki, Te Ātiawa), Prue Kapua (Te Arawa) and Kim Ngarimu (Ngāti Porou) have been appointed as members of the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • Te Paea Paringatai (Waikato and Ngāti Porou) has been appointed a member of the Library and Information Advisory Commission.
  • The Ngā Tohu Reo Māori 2018 (National Māori Language Awards 2018) were held last week. The winners were:
    • Iwi Award – Muriwai Jones;
    • Whānau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Rangatahi Award – Māori Television Giphy Channel by Fly;
    • Takitahi Award – Mike Hollings (Ngāti Raukawa and Te Atihaunui-a-Paparangi);
    • Mātauranga Kaupapa Māori Education Award – Taringa Punua Pāoho by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Mātauranga Whānui Education Award – Mahuru Māori – Fortnite by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa;
    • Kāwanatanga Award – Te Amorangi ki mua, Te Hāpai Ō ki muri by Rotorua Lakes Council
    • Pakihi Award – Te Mātāpuna by Fonterra;
    • Te Mahi Toi, Te Mahi Whakangahau Award – Oti te Nanekoti by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga;
    • Ngā Mahi Pāpāho Award – Sky TV, Tiki Towns;
    • Ngā Hapori Māori Award – Dr Te Taku Parai (Ngāti Toa);
    • Aotearoatanga Award – Kōrero Māori by Te Hiku Media;
    • Te Wiki o te Reo Māori Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Huia te Reo Award – Kupu App by Spark & Te Aka Māori Dictionary;
    • Te Tohu Oranga Angitu Award – Ahorangi Whatarangi Winiata (Ngāti Raukawa);
    • Ngā Tohu Kairangi: Special Commendations:
      • #1miriona – Te Māngai Pāho
      • Hīkoi Reo Māori Whangārei – Te Kura Taitamawāhine o Whangārei
      • Guyon Espiner – Te Reo Irirangi o Aotearoa
      • Fush Uka – Anton Matthew
      • Te Tauihu – Te Kaunihera o Pōneke.
  • On Saturday 1 December Wakatū Incorporation will hold their annual general meeting in Nelson. A highlight for Wakatū Incorporation this year has been the twenty-year anniversary of Tohu Wines. In 1998, Wakatū Incorporation, in partnership with Rarua Atiawa Iwi Trust and Wi Pere Trust, launched Tohu Wines. Tohu Wines is recognised as He mātāmua taketake – the first Māori-owned and operated wine label in the world. In 2010 Wakatū Incorporation became the sole owners of the brand. At the AGM three board appointments will also be decided.
  • This week the former Minister of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Chris Finlayson, announced his pending retirement from politics, in January 2019. Mr Finlayson oversaw the conclusion of approximately sixty Treaty of Waitangi settlements; and is therefore well known throughout iwi groups in New Zealand.  During his tenure the total dollar quantum of settlements rose from a few hundred million to circa two billion in direct redress.  Although his initial goal of settling all historic claims was not achieved while he was Minister (in particular the settlement with Ngā Puhi reads as the one that got away), Mr Finlayson hastened and streamlined the overall settlement process.  In our view he is without doubt a Parliamentary peer in regards to how much time and effort he placed in resolving outstanding Treaty of Waitangi grievances whilst a Minister of the Crown.
  • Parininihi ki Waitōtara Inc, Te Atiawa Iwi Holdings, and Taranaki Iwi Holding have formed Ngāmotu Hotels Limited Partnership for the purpose of taking ownership of the Novotel New Plymouth. The sale date is set for 1 January 2019, and the price is reportedly $23 million.
  • On Tuesday the Parliamentary Committee stage of the Child Poverty Reduction Bill was completed, and the Bill was divided into two Bills: (i) Child Poverty Reduction Bill; (ii) Children’s Amendment Bill.  This policy area is of importance to Māori, as current Ministry of Social Development research indicates circa 90,000 tamariki Māori live in poorer households / poverty.  The new measures and goals within this proposed legislation will include Māori specific poverty reduction objectives, set in consultation with Māori, based on Treaty principles (Pānui 37/2018 and Pānui 2/2018 refer).
  • On Thursday the second reading of the Misuse of Drugs (Medicinal Cannabis) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, allowing for the use of cannabis-based products for people with a terminal illness, and to legalize and regulate medical cannabidiol (CBD) products.  A Government Supplementary Order Paper (i.e. a means to improve some parts of this Bill) has also now been put forward for consideration at the Parliamentary Committee Stage.  We advise that the Ministry of Health has commenced issuing licenses to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes, and that Māori and community-owned Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been awarded a licence to do so.
  • On Wednesday the Minister of Health, Dr David Clark, announced that he had received the report of the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction – He Ara Oranga: report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction.  The report will likely be made public before the end of 2018 and the Government’s formal response will be published during March 2019.
  • On Wednesday the Māori Television Board announced that its Chief Executive, Keith Ikin, had resigned and will leave the organisation in early 2019. Mr Ikin (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāpuhi, Whanganui) has been with the organisation for 18 months. Deputy Chief Executive Shane Taurima will step into the Acting Chief Executive role until a replacement is appointed.
  • Last week Māori Television announced that its current affairs shows will end production shortly and will be replaced by a single brand in 2019. The current affairs programmes   Kawekōrero, Native Affairs and Rereātea will end in December and the news programme Te Kāea will end in February 2019.
  • Last week the Government released the Early childhood education draft strategic plan 2019-29 “He taonga te tamaiti, Every child a taonga”. Despite the title this document places little emphasis on tamaiti Māori or Māori mediums of learning.

https://conversation.education.govt.nz/conversations/early-learning-strategic-plan/

Salient Māori News Items for the week ending E35, 5 October 2018

 

  • Professor Cindy Kiro (Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Hine) has been appointed Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of Auckland.
  • Ross Wilson (Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed Chair of the WorkSafe New Zealand Board.
  • Karis Knight (Ngāti Porou) has been awarded the New Zealand Psychological Society Karahipi Tumuaki Scholarship. Ms Knight (University of Auckland student) has focused her research on the effect of whakamā (shame or embarrassment) on Māori mental health.
  • Last month the Ministry of Justice published a factsheet on Adult Conviction and Sentencing for the year ending 30 June 2018. In 2017/18 circa 75,500 adults were charged with a crime, and 83% of charges resulted in a conviction. The most salient population disparity is via gender, with 78% of convictions relating to males.  There is also a significant difference between Māori and non-Māori conviction rates, with 41% of all convicted adults being Māori.

https://www.justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/adults-convicted-and-sentenced-data-highlights-june-2018.pdf

  • On Monday Mahuru Youth Remand Service was launched in Kaikohe. The service which will be rolled out across the Taitokerau region is a collaboration between Ngāpuhi Iwi Social Services and Oranga Tamariki.
  • On Monday the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) was launched. The Government’s aspiration is that the agency will help reduce homelessness and improve housing affordability. The agency brings together housing policy, funding and regulatory functions from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, the Ministry of Social Development and The Treasury.  (Housing is a significant issue for Māori with over a third of Housing NZ tenants identifying as Māori, Māori home ownership being 35% and Māori being over-represented within the grouping of families without suitable housing; refer Pānui E24/2018).
  • Last Friday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, advised she has received the report into the investigation into the affairs of the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, had considered the findings and recommendations, and written to the Board to implement the recommendations. What she did not do, however, is address the public interest in this matter by releasing the report, nor advising what the findings and recommendations were.   We consider that unacceptably poor judgement from this Minister, as this Board is a statutory entity established by the Parliament of New Zealand, in receipt of public funds, and supposedly monitored by Te Puni Kōkiri (i.e. it is not a private entity).  Minister Mahuta’s approach goes against the messaging of open and transparent government which we note is being espoused by the Prime Minister.    The investigation followed allegations relating to governance and management concerns, and in particular the 2017 triennial elections of the Board.    Fortunately, however, the Trust Board itself has acted with greater awareness of stewardship duties than the Minister, and has publicly released the report.  Accordingly, we will advise on it further in Pānui edition 36/2018.

[Note: we further advise that voting has opened for members of Whakatōhea iwi to choose to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, or alternatively restart the mandating process. Voting ends 26 October.   Refer Pānui 13/2018 for details.]

  • On Monday the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) released a report entitled Maiea Te Tūruapō, Fulfilling the Vision. The report is based on the OCC’s independent monitoring of Oranga Tamariki policies, practices and services: in particular the current practice of placing young people in large secure residences. This report is particularly important to Māori, given 63% of the circa 5,000 children and young people in State care situations are Māori (circa 3,100).  We will provide a review of this report Pānui E36/2018.

Registrations are now open for the Federation of Māori Authorities Conference, to be held: Friday 2 – Sunday 4 November, Emerald

E31 Salient Māori News Summary for the Week Ending 14 September 2018

  • Colleen Neville (Ngāti Maniapoto) and Kauahi Ngapora (Ngāi Tahu, Waikato-Tainui) have been appointed as members of the Tourism New Zealand Board.
  • On Tuesday the second reading of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill was completed in Parliament. This bill seeks to reduce domestic violence through introducing cross agency information sharing provisions, increasing access to risk assessments services, and recording family violence offending more accurately within justice sector agencies. Māori whānau experience higher levels of domestic violence than others (Pānui 23/2014 refers).
  • Next week the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little will hold three public hui with members of Ngāpuhi in Australia. The purpose of the hui is to progress Treaty settlement discussions. It is estimated that circa 25,000 Ngāpuhi live in Australia.
Sydney 22 September 12:00 – 2:00pm Te Wairua Tapu Wharekarakia, Redfern, Sydney
Brisbane 22 September 6:30 – 8:30pm Pullman Brisbane Airport Hotel, Brisbane
Perth 23 September 2:30 – 4:30pm Ken Jackman Hall, Darius Wells Library, Kwinana, Perth

https://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngapuhi/

  • Associate Professor Leonie Pihama (Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Māhanga, Ngā Māhanga a Tairi) has received Endeavour Research Programme funding of circa $2.16 million over 4 years for her study, He Waka Eke Noa: Maori Cultural Frameworks for Violence Prevention and Intervention Research.
  • Dr Farrar Palmer (Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto) has received $250,000 from Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga for her research study which explores mātauranga and tikanga Māori in sporting contexts, Manawa Te Taonga Tuku Iho.
  • On Monday to celebrate Te Wiki Te Reo Māori three newspapers which are published for the Whanganui and South Taranaki communities commenced print with “h” being added to Whanganui. In November 2015 the Local Government Act 2002 was amended to reflect the spelling of the district of Whanganui. The decision recognised that ‘Wanganui’ has no meaning in Te Reo Māori.  It also ensured the district name was consistent with the official names of the river and the town.
  • On Tuesday Te Tumu Paeroa launched Taikura Nuku, a modelling service used to identify the productivity potential of Māori land.
  • On Thursday Trans-Tasman Resources Limited announced they will appeal the High Court decision quashing its consent to mine iron sand offshore from the South Taranaki seabed. Pānui E29/2018 refers.

E23 6 July 2018 – Quarterly Review for the Period 1 April to 30 June 2018

This quarterly review provides a summary of significant Māori focused social, economic and Treaty policy developments for the period 1 April to 30 June 2018.

Within the quarter we reviewed 12 data set publications, 10 research reports, 8 Government policy / legislative issues. Information summaries are provided within the following appendices.

This quarter there have been three Māori focused policy items of salient note:

  • Budget 2018/19 reduced specific Māori Development funds – the Finance Minister said this is because Te Puni Kōkiri had not used past money, and that Māori are gaining outcomes elsewhere; whereas the Minister for Māori Development denied (wrongly) that was the Budget reality;
  • Whānau Ora is to be externally reviewed – although a Te Puni Kōkiri evaluation released this month of the initiative finds no issues arising; and
  • the Government has rejected building a mega prison at Waikeria instead a 500 bed rebuild will be undertaken, linked to a 100 bed secure mental health facility, a policy decision which suggests greater awareness of the significant link between criminal offending and poor mental health.

These items are further discussed below. Further information is available within the appendices and Pānui editions as referenced.

Social Policy Matters

Overview of Socio-Economic Matters

Data released this quarter continues to show ongoing socio-economic disparities presenting between Māori and other New Zealanders, with no significant positive or negative change. Two key statistics for the quarter are that:

  • 97,400 Māori (aged 18-64 years) and their household whānau are welfare reliant – this is circa 26% of working age Māori adults; and
  • 6% of Māori in the labour force were unemployed, (33,100 people). By comparison, the New Zealand overall unemployment rate was about half of that, at 4.4%[1]

Education Sector Summary

This quarter the New Zealand Qualifications Authority released the 2017 NCEA results; which showed around 74% of Year 12 Māori learners achieved NCEA level 2. This was about the same as the previous year, and ten percentile points below non-Māori.  Research and ideas for addressing schooling disparities continued to be tabled, with a discussion on racial bias making it into the official policy papers as one rationale for reforming the school sector.

More positively, new research on literacy shows significant gains across the Māori population over the last decade – with 81% of Māori now having fair or better English language literacy (which is needed for workforce gains). Te Reo literacy is also strong, with Māori school learners found to be enjoying this subject and also out-performing others across the board.  This success perhaps links back to the racial bias / differing cultural capital discussion – i.e. if most teachers were Māori and taught subjects such as maths and science from a Māori perspective (as Te Reo is) would the results across the nation be different?  Other education items of note:

  • The Treasury contributed to the disparity discussion with research that confirmed the obvious conclusion that students who change schools a lot are at educational risk – and they noted Māori more than others are in this grouping;
  • the Ministry of Education’s tertiary research analyst released a report that confirms that greater proportions of Māori study at the lower levels in the tertiary education sector (linked to lower school qualifications). The result of the tertiary education outcome is that a qualification disadvantage presents within the workforce thereby suppressing Māori wages and employment opportunities;
  • research about the Youth Guarantee initiative was released, which shows the programme is successful in keeping students engaged in education (good), but that links to tertiary level 4 study and industry training / apprenticeships and the like, are not clearly proven (not good). e. whilst these students (many are Māori) undertake trade preparation type courses, the initiative is not actually giving them a direct pathway into employment within the trade sectors.

Health Sector Summary

In the health sector, as always, an assortment of research data was published. This quarter disparities were shown in areas such as tamariki deaths, abortion rates, children with “major social, emotional and/or behavioural problems”, elderly nutrition, colorectal cancer, and non-seat belt wearing car accident deaths.  Probably all well intended studies and data sets, but collectively all reflecting the differences in how Māori and non-Māori live so differently within the same geopolitical terra firma.

The key item within the health sector, however, was the announcement of a major review of how services work. We note, in regard to the review, Health Minister David Clark states, “we need to face up to the fact that our health system does not deliver equally well for all. We know our Māori and Pacific peoples have worse health outcomes and shorter lives. That is something we simply cannot accept.”   Given the above data, which is relentless every quarter in showing some form of health disparity, in our view the Minister could not be more veridical.

Housing Sector Summary

In the housing sector Minister Phil Twyford (re)announced $63.4 million funding for ‘Housing First Fund’, which is focusing on increasing houses available for vulnerable families. The need for this was also (re)confirmed with the Ministry of Social Development also releasing its public housing quarterly report, to 31 March 2018.   The report finds that 36% (23,600-odd) public housing tenants are Māori.  That is disproportionately high, given Māori are 15% of the total population.   In addition, there is a register of who needs a house and qualify for assistance, but do not have one – of these people we advise 44% are Māori (circa 3,500 tangata.)

Overall this type of data points towards housing being an issue of prominence for Māori – i.e. over 10% of all Māori may be living in or needing state/public housing – compared with about 1% of non-Māori. The next policy action required from this Ministry is to better link this data with sole-parent and gender information, as indicative links with household income data point towards sole-mothers, mainly Māori, being the grouping disproportionately in need.

Justice Sector Summary

There were two key items within the justice sector this quarter of relevance to Māori. First, as above, the Government announced it would not build a mega prison at Waikeria, but it would rebuild a smaller prison, and a 100-bed secure mental health facility.  While this is well short of the radical tikanga Māori prison proposal Minister Kelvin Davis broached back when he was in opposition, it is a step towards better recognising the strong link between criminal offending and poor mental health.  The Government’s Waikeria decision ties in well with the second item of note: robust research from the Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Scientific Advisor showing that early intervention works best in preventing offending.  This is partially because young offenders often have mental health issues: for example, alcohol or drug dependencies, which can be addressed early thereby mitigating offending and other social ills.  Note also this quarter the Ministry of Health released a research report indicating perhaps 12% of Māori children, around 23,000, may have what they classified as ‘significant social, emotional and/or behavioural problems’.

In our assessment while there has been a known link between criminal offending and health previously, there does appear to be a conceptual shift away from the notion that some people are ‘criminals’ (full stop), towards an understanding that many people who commit offences do so because of a period of poor mental health, which means they do not appropriately regulate their own behaviours. This discussion is particularly important for Māori, as about half of the people incarcerated in New Zealand prisons are Māori, and Māori also have much higher rates of reported mental health issues.  Accordingly, the scientific recommendation to focus on mitigation of poor health and behaviour issues early in life does present as a sensible basis for new policies, including the proposal that Māori approaches be used to support Māori tamariki.  This in our view is ‘not rocket science’, but it is now published scientific research none the less.

Social Sector Summary

In the social wellbeing sector, as noted above, 97,000 Māori households are welfare reliant. Statistics New Zealand also released data which showed poor households such as these face greater inflation pressures.  A link to the increased price of tobacco was made, implying tobacco consumption is detrimental to household finances, not just population health.   In addition, funding to reduce family violence was also (re)announced; and The Treasury released a report indicating they are still beavering away somewhere on what wellbeing might actually be; (possibly it will mean having more money to pay the bills, having a home, being free of violence and the like, but they have not landed it just yet).  A separate Māori wellbeing framework is also being considered by The Treasury.  (We note Whānau Ora contains a solid Māori wellbeing framework, but The Treasury does not acknowledge its existence.)

The annual evaluation of Whānau Ora was released by Te Puni Kōkiri (TPK). We found it to be a weak evaluation report which identified no issues arising and continued to under-explain this initiative.  Ironically, that report was released (without a Ministerial forward) just weeks after the Government announced it would review Whānau Ora, and with terms of reference that clearly signals that transparency and accountability are items for improvement.  We interpret that as a vote of no-confidence in TPK in this work area.   However, perhaps more directly relevant to many Māori whānau (circa one-third) is that this quarter the Government confirmed that it would review the entire welfare system.  Quite what this entails is not yet clear.

Economic Matters

The Budget

The major economic item for the quarter is the Government’s Budget, released in May. Overall the Government is forecasting an operating surplus of $3.1 billion, even after taking into account its new spending.  But as advised above, for Vote: Māori Development funding is to drop, this year, and every year forecast afterwards.[2]  As previously noted Finance Minister Grant Robertson says the drop in Vote: Māori Development reflects programmes that Te Puni Kōkiri did not deliver on being removed from the Budget – so again an implicit vote of no confidence for TPK, which is presenting as somewhat under siege.  In his view, however, Māori whānau are estimated to receive $1.5 billion more in services through the Government’s wider programmes, such as the Families Package: however we can see no means for the Government to evidence that estimate.

In our assessment, funds removed from Te Puni Kōkiri will reduce its policy function from this year – effectively retarding its ability to give advice on the impact of mainstream programmes on Māori. This is despite the fact that there are service gaps – i.e. disparities being experienced by Māori in all social areas, including health, education and housing – some of which are shown in the discussion above.

We note there has been no consultation with Māori, and no explanation as to why Māori Development funds went unspent last year. The denials of funding cuts by Ministers Mahuta and Jackson do not help the situation.[3]  In short, the Labour Party holds all seven Māori electoral seats in Parliament and has the largest number of Māori members of Cabinet than at any time previously.  At both Ratana and Waitangi Day earlier this year the Government indicated it would increase Māori services, so it follows some Māori voters may feel betrayed by this Budget, and particularly by the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, who so far has tabled no clear initiatives nor policy plan for Māori Development.  The pressure will be on her to deliver something in next year’s Budget; and she will also need to either express a higher level of confidence in Te Puni Kōkiri or to propose something better.

Pānui also reviewed other Vote areas in regard to Māori specific funding. Information is provided in the appendices: there were no radical changes of note.

 

Other Economic Matters

Six other economic matters of note are listed below.

  • The consultancy firm TDB Advisory released a report summarising the financial performance of eight iwi, from 2011 to 2017.  The iwi groups are Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrakei, Rangitāne o Wairau, Raukawa, Ngāi Tūhoe and Waikato-Tainui. All have made money, a few have made lots of money (e.g. Waikato-Tainui had a strong financial year), with very good returns on their investments.
  • The Productivity Commission released a draft report on climate change, proposing new legislation and a new Commission to assist future Governments achieve a low emission economy. For Māori they suggest a Treaty of Waitangi clause would be useful for incoming legislation, combined with some type of Māori advisory committee.
  • The Ministry for the Environment also published work on climate change, with a report from its technical working group being released. This group has a range of recommendations to reduce emissions, and for Māori specifically they suggest the Government “commission mātauranga Māori-led measures that reflect cultural impacts of climate change and are developed and managed by iwi/hapū”.
  • The Land and Water Forum released a new report focusing on how to prevent degradation of water quality, particularly sediment and nitrogen pollutants. In relation to Māori, the Forum repeats its views that Māori interests in water (i.e. any proprietary and usage rights) are in their ‘too-hard’ basket, and thus the Crown needs to address such matters directly.   They point out the current situation is creating uncertainty which undermines long term investment decisions needed to improve water quality.  Hence their recommendation that “Central government must, as a priority, work with iwi to reach agreement on how to resolve rights and interests in fresh water.”.
  • The Government announced that the offshore block offers for oil and gas exploration permits will end (i.e. no new offers to be made). The block offer was an annual tender process established by the former National led Government that allowed for oil and gas companies to bid for permits. Many iwi groups had petitioned about oil exploration in their respective off-shore areas.
  • The Government has announced it is reviewing consumer credit regulations, of interest as Māori are identified as one grouping at risk – which is no surprise given the high percentage of welfare reliance noted above.

Treaty Matters

Waitangi Tribunal Matters
This quarter the Waitangi Tribunal released its report on its Whakatōhea Mandate Inquiry. The Tribunal found the Crown breached the Treaty of Waitangi by prioritising its objective of seeking to conclude a Treaty settlement over processes that were fair to the hapū groupings within Whakatōhea.  Thus the decision to recognise the pre-settlement Trust mandate was found not to be fair, reasonable or made in good faith.  This is consistent with the Tribunal’s view in other areas: that mandate issues, including hapū consent must be satisfactorily resolved before the Crown pushes ahead with negotiations.

Treaty Settlements
This quarter Parliament made progress with five Treaty settlements; with two of these reaching conclusion and thus becoming law. The groupings were:

  • Ngāti Rangi (legislation introduced to Parliament);
  • Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Tamaoho (both had respective second readings)[4];
  • Heretaunga Tamatea and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki both had their respective third readings – thereby concluding these two settlements of circa $100 million and $13 million respectively.

Government and Parliamentary Matters
In addition to the above sector issues, we note three further Parliamentary matters of note this quarter.

  • Adding to the Treaty settlement concerns of Whakatōhea, the Minister for Māori Development has advised she has asked for an independent review of the governance and management of the Whakatōhea Trust Board;
  • A Bill to entrench Māori electoral seats was introduced to Parliament.
  • Referenda were held by five local bodies in regard to the establishment of Māori wards – in all cases the notion of Māori wards was rejected by voters. This situation of predominantly non-Māori voters determining how Māori voters may be represented within local Government presents to us as manifestly unjust.  The matter is discussed within Pānui 15/2018.

[1] This data is from Statistics New Zealand and the Ministry of Social Development data sets.

[2] It will drop by $2 million in the year ahead (even after setting aside all extraordinary increases this year), and by $17 million over the next four years.

[3] Their answers to Parliamentary Questions have been provided in Pānui so that subscribers can determine for themselves the integrity of the responses given to challenging questions.

[4] The Ngāti Porou Bill relates to marine and foreshore matters.

State of the Nation and 100 Days Speeches 02 February 2018 (Edition 2/2018)

On Wednesday the Leader of the Opposition, Bill English gave his ‘State of the Nation’ speech, which was followed later by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s ‘100 Day Progress’ speech; i.e. the two key opening political speeches for the year.

Overall Mr English’s speech reads as a lamentation – highlighting what he considered where all the good things his party had achieved, and bemoaning that the Labour-led Government might now risk it all, particularly in the areas of employment relations and economic growth. In that respect it was a classic right wing speech about the risks of a left wing Government.  Nothing new there.

From a Māori policy perspective two points are salient. First, when Mr English talked of their past successes, he left off progressing Treaty settlements.  This is an area where his Government experienced outstanding success, leaving its opposition in shreds, in regards to how many Treaty claims they progressed and settled.  Chris Finlayson’s work in this area will be, in our view, the stuff of legend in the future – given he oversaw perhaps 50 plus settlements, and facilitated the package of settlements to extend above $2 billion, and gained cross-party support for this work.  However, we note Bill English consistently leaves this out of his speeches: it is as if the National Party is not particularly proud of this achievement, or does not think it appeals to its core supporters.

Our second observation is that Mr English only made one mention of Māori, and it was in a negative context, saying that without the proposed Te Ture Whenua Māori reforms, the New Zealand First policy of planting forests on Māori land is unlikely to succeed.  His linkage is not well made, and we note that for generations forests (including Government forests) have been planted on Māori land – i.e. the former reforms are not required for the tree planting scheme to proceed.  Overall if this is a ‘State of the Nation’ speech, then Māori are entirely invisible to this political party at this time.

The Prime Minister’s speech followed later in the day, and focused on explaining what they had sought to put in place within their first 100 days, and why, and also what they intend to pursue next. The key focus areas were employment policies, poverty reduction (discussed below), and setting new socio-economic targets to measure the wellbeing of New Zealand, beyond just GDP. In regards to Māori, Prime Minister Ardern, noted the need for politicians to speak openly on challenging social issues of inequalities, such as the high Māori imprisonment rate.  She also stated that,

“we are a nation that has duties and responsibilities under the Treaty of Waitangi that extends to, and beyond, the negotiating table.  We must be a Government  that builds not just relationships, but partnerships with iwi.”

We advise the Prime Minister made similar (but more articulate) comments last week on the importance of the Treaty of Waitangi, but that was to a largely Māori audience who would appreciate that – this week’s speech was aimed at a broader audience. In our assessment this signalling of approach is positive for Māori/iwi, and combined with having a strong Māori caucus it will be interesting to see what this transpires into.

Treaty Settlement Updates 26 January 2018 (Edition 2/2018)

Taranaki Maunga To Have Legal Personality
In late December the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Andrew Little, announced that a Record of Understanding over collective cultural redress for Taranaki Maunga had been reached between the Crown and the eight iwi with direct affiliations and guardianship responsibilities to the Mountain. Taranaki will be recognised in law as a legal personality in his own right; with joint responsibility for guardianship shared between the iwi and the Crown.  This model parallels that used in relation to the Whanganui River and Te Urewera.   It will involve repealing the Mount Egmont Vesting Act, establishing legal personality and the creation of a joint Crown-Iwi governance entity for the area within the National Park.  Funding to administer the governance arrangement has not been announced.   The record of understanding is available here: www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/taranaki-maunga/

Ngāti Maru – Agreement in Principle Reached
Ngāti Maru have signed an Agreement in Principle to settle their historic Treaty of Waitangi claims with the Crown (this is the last of the eight Taranaki iwi to reach this stage in the settlement process, and allows for the agreement above to proceed.) The agreement provides for commercial / financial redress of $30 million, the details are which are still to be finalised. www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-maru-taranaki/

Tūwharetoa Treaty Settlement – First Reading
On 20 December the first Parliamentary reading of the Tūwharetoa Treaty Settlement Bill occurred. The settlement includes $25 million of commercial redress, and $4 million of cultural redress, including the transfer of 32 sites of significance to the iwi (along with an historic account and Crown apology). A unique feature of this settlement is that there will also be the establishment of the Tongariro Trout Hatchery and Freshwater Ecology Centre Trust, which will be co-managed by Ngāti Tūwharetoa, the Minister of Conservation and the Tongariro National Trout Centre Society.[1] www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-tuwharetoa/

Te Iwi and Hapū o Wairoa – Second Reading
On 20 December the second Parliamentary reading of the The Iwi and Hapū of Te Rohe Wairoa Claims Settlement Bill occurred. This settlement for a cluster of hapū/iwi, under the collective banner of Te Tira Whakaemi o Te Wairoa, totals circa $100 million in commercial and financial redress.

Waikato Tainui and Ngai Tahu relativity clauses further enacted
The Government has confirmed that the latest round of Treaty settlements enacted the relativity clauses within the Waikato Tainui settlement (which must be 17% of all settlements), and the Ngāi Tahu settlement (which must be 16.1% of all settlements). In effect this means, as the total treaty settlements now push pass the $2 billion marker, Waikato / Tainui gained a further $190 million top-up, and Ngāi Tahu gained a further $180 million since settling.  These amounts, being more than the original settlements for both iwi, have gained some negative attention in the mainstream media – but they were actually no surprise, as relativity actually means keeping settlements relative between iwi.  We will comment further on this matter in an extended edition of Treaty settlements scheduled for June.

[1] This settlement is separate to the Crown Forestry Rental Trust settlement which Tūwharetoa is a part of.  It is also separate to arrangements concerning the bed of Lake Taupō.

Waitangi Day Preparations 26 January 2018 (Edition1/2018)

The next political race meet will be Waitangi Day. Again the Prime Minister has indicated strong pre-event form, by electing to stay in the area for five days – far longer than others before her, and noteworthy given former Prime Minister Mr English elected to attend ceremonies elsewhere last year.   The official pōwhiri has also been moved to the Upper Marae, to avoid the debacles that have occurred at Te Tīi Marae in recent years.  (Ngāpuhi leader Sonny Tau suggested that was not right, but his view was quickly dispatched by Titiwhai Harawira, who indicated that the Iwi Chairs Forum had walked right past Te Tii for their meetings, so there was no problem for State dignitaries to do the same.)   Also speaking arrangements for Prime Minister Arden have been clarified, as a pregnant woman, organisers have determined it is safe and appropriate for her to speak on the porch of the meeting house.  So all seems much more in order than in the last few years – and if alleged ‘financial irregularities’ within the Waitangi National Trust had not been reported to the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) a couple of weeks ago by new Acting Chair, Dennis McBreaty – then we would’ve advised a positive forecast ahead.  However the potential SFO probe is a significant matter, and we will advise further once information on that is released.

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 19 June 2015 (edition 21/2015)

  • The submission period for the draft Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill has been extended to Friday 7 August 2015. For further information on the draft bill refer to Pānui edition 18/2015.
  • This week a media outlet reported on a New Zealand Police intervention which refers Māori drivers without a valid licence in the Counties Manukau District to attend training, and gain the correct licence – rather than receive an immediate fine.  If completed successfully no fine is issued.  The purpose of this is to reduce Māori road trauma and offending, in accordance with the Police Turning of the Tide strategy (Pānui 28/2014 refers).   The media outlet suggested this was a race-based policy that benefits only Māori.
  • Ngā Ruahine are considering appealing the Environmental Protection Authority decision to grant a 35-year marine consent to Shell Todd Oil Services to continue running its Maui offshore oil and gas field off the Taranaki coast.
  • Ngāti Ruanui are supporting a petition created by Kiwis Against Seabed Mining (KASM) calling for a moratorium on all seabed mining in New Zealand waters, until a more thorough understanding of the risks and impacts are understood.
  • Last week we advised Dr Lance O’Sullivan was appointed Chairman of Te Whānau o Hato Petera Trust.  This is the Trust that oversees the hostel at Hato Petera College.  Subscribers may recall quality concerns are presenting at this college, Pānui 43/2014 refers.  However this week, the appointment has been ruled to be invalid by the incumbent Chair, Tame Te Rangi, on the grounds that a 5-1 vote in favour of Dr O’Sullivan failed as there was an insufficient quorum.  (The board has twelve positions, but six are presently vacant.)  In response, Dr O’Sullivan is said to be seeking a whānau hui this weekend, to have more members elected to the board, allowing for a further attempt at gaining the chairperson’s role.  Mr Te Rangi, however, has indicated that there is a formal process for calling a special general meeting which must be followed.  In addition, Dr O’Sullivan has indicated there have been incidents of serious student bullying within the hostel, and a matter has been referred to the Police for their consideration.
  • Last Friday the University of Otago published an online research report called Oranga Niho me Ngā Tangata Whaiora: Oral health and Māori Mental Health Patients.  The research studied the effect of rehabilitative dental treatment on mental health, oral health, and quality of life; and found positive improvements with improved care.   The report can be view here: http://www.otago.ac.nz/sjwri/otago110932.pdf

Māori News Stories for the Weeks Ending 15 May and 22 May 2015

Social Matters

Valuation of the Benefit System

Last Thursday the Minister of Social Development, Anne Tolley, released a summary of key findings from the report Valuation of the Benefit System for Working Age Adults: as at 30 June 2014. The report was prepared by Taylor Fry (a consultancy firm) and was published on the Ministry of Social Development website in February. 

The report outlines the lifetime costs of approximately 570,000 working-age Work and Income New Zealand clients who received income support for the year ending 30 June 2014.  The total estimated cost (liability) of benefit payments and related expenses for clients who received income support until they reach retirement age is $69 billion.  Key Māori findings of note are:

  • 38 percent of Work and Income New Zealand clients aged 18 to 24 years are Māori;
  • intergenerational benefit receipt was highest amongst Māori; with 87 percent of Māori clients aged 18 to 24 years having at least one parent receiving a benefit. The rate was 65 percent for non-Māori;[1]
  • 54 percent of Māori clients aged 18 to 24 years are clients with intensive family benefit history. A client with intensive family benefit history is described as a client whose parent was intensively in the benefit system during the years the client was aged 13 to 17 years.
  • Māori are disproportionately at risk of longer benefit reliance compared with non-Māori. The report identifies a correlation between intergenerational benefit receipt and longer benefit terms;
  • The concentration of Māori beneficiaries is highest in Northland, East Cost and Bay of Plenty regions;
  • Māori living in Auckland or Northland will receive on average $40,000 more in benefits than other ethnic groups in these regions.Despite these marked disparities between Māori and non-Māori, the study does not propose any solutions or recommendations for change.  We also advise, Minister Tolley’s press release on this matter failed to identify any issues presenting in relation to Māori – like her Ministry she remains silent on ethnic differences in this area.  That is, within the welfare sector there is still no formal acknowledgement of the need to consider and address Māori welfare dependency as a unique policy matter.The report can be viewed here:

http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/media-releases/2015/valuation.pdf

Census – Education and Training Data Released

Last Tuesday Statistics New Zealand published, 2013 Census – Education and Training Data.  The publication provides information on education, training engagement, and formal qualifications attained for people aged 15 years and over, derived from census data.

Overall the proportion of people with formal qualifications increased to 79 percent in 2013; up from 75 percent in 2006. For Māori 67 percent held a formal qualification in 2013; up from 60 percent in 2006. Noteworthy is the increase of Māori with bachelor degrees – increasing to 7.5 percent (27,057 people) in 2013, from 5.5 percent (17,907 people) in 2006.   Other findings of note were:

  • 30 percent of Māori aged 15-years and older have no formal qualifications;
  • the highest qualification for 41 percent of Māori (147,900) was a level 1–3 tertiary certificate; and
  • 48 percent of Māori aged 15 to 19 years were enrolled in school or tertiary study (circa 35,000 people).

The publication can be viewed here: http://www.stats.govt.nz/Census/2013-census/profile-and-summary-reports/qstats-education-training.aspx

 

Māori Life Expectancy

Earlier this month Statistics NZ published, The New Zealand Period Life Tables: 2012–14.   Findings show that the difference between Māori and non-Māori life expectancy at birth has reduced to 7.1 years (it was previously 7.3 years).  Male Māori life expectancy at birth is now 73 years, compared with 79.5 years for all males.  Māori female life expectancy is 77.1 years, compared with to 83.2 years for all females.

Quarterly Labour Market Scorecard – March 2015

Last Thursday the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a Labour Market Scorecard for the quarter ending 31 March 2015. The scorecard is a one-page summary on labour market statistics and indicators. The key Māori statistics and indicators for the March 2015 quarter are:

  • 63.3 percent of Māori 18 year-old school levers in 2013 attained NCEA level 2 or higher;
  • 29.6 percent of Māori school levers in 2013 did not attain NCEA level 1;
  • the Māori unemployment rate is 12.6 percent; and
  • the Māori Labour force participation is 66.5 percent.Pānui has already advised on these matters as the data was released,referto Pānui 15/2015 for details.

     

    Economic Matters

    FoMA Members – Agricultural Production Tables as at 30 June 2014

    Last Monday Statistics New Zealand published agricultural production tables from a survey of farms owned by members of the Federation of Māori Authorities (FoMA), as at 30 June 2014.

    Key findings show the average size of a FoMA member farm is circa 2,260 hectares – approximately nine times larger than the average New Zealand farm size.  Federation members own and manage 266,400ha of farm and forestry; which represents 1.9% of New Zealand’s total farm and forestry production land.[2]  Federation members also own 0.9% of deer; 1.9% of sheep; 1.9% of beef cattle, and 0.6% of dairy stock in New Zealand.

    Pukeroa Oruawhata Group Receives Tourism Funding

    On Wednesday the Minister of Tourism, John Key, announced the Pukeroa Oruawhata Group and its business partner, World Spa Ltd, will receive $350,000 from the Tourism Growth Partnership fund.  The funding will be invested in the first stage of a proposed large scale health and well-being complex on the Rotorua lakefront.

    Toi Moana Bay of Plenty Regional Growth Study Published

    Last Tuesday a Toi Moana Bay of Plenty Regional Growth Study was published on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment website. The report was prepared by MartinJenkins (a consultancy firm) and commissioned by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

    The report is the third in a series of regional growth studies, which have the purpose of “identifying the sectors and commercial opportunities in each region that have the potential to sustainably grow incomes, jobs and investment”.   We are reviewing this document to determine relevance for Māori, and will advise further.

    The report can be viewed here: http://www.med.govt.nz/sectors-industries/regions-cities/research/regional-growth-studies/toi-moana-bay-of-plenty-regional-growth-study-opportunities

     

    Ngāi Tahu Tourism Wins Trade Award

    Ngāi Tahu Tourism has won the Auckland International Airport Award for Excellence in Tourism at the HSBC China Business Awards.

     

    Te Tatau Pounamu – Māori Representation and Participation Conference

The New Zealand Māori Council will be hosting a one day Māori Representation and Participation Conference, 31 May 2015 in Palmerston North.  The conference is entitled Te Tatau Pounamu to register or view the full conference programme athttp://www.maoricouncil.com/2015/05/12/te-tatau-pounamu-conference-programme-and-registration/

 

 

Treaty Matters

Araukuku Hapū – Urgent Hearing with the Waitangi Tribunal Declined

This month Araukuku, a South Taranaki hapū lodged an application with the Wellington High Court seeking a review of a Waitangi Tribunal decision not to grant an urgent hearing into its claim (Wai 552) to have the hapū removed from Ngāruahine Deed of Settlement.  The Deed of Settlement was signed in August 2014, but the Tribunal application was only lodged in February 2015 (with Tribunal decision being released on 7 May).

 

The Crown purchase Battle of Ōrākau site

The Crown has purchased a 9.7 hectare property at Ōrākau near Kihikihi. The property was the site of the 1864 Battle of Ōrākau. The land will be placed in the Office of Treaty Settlements Landbank and maintained by the Crown while consultation with iwi, the Heritage Society and Waipa Council continue on its future governance and management.

 

Appointments

Dame Tariana Turia has been appointed to the Superu Board – Social Policy Evaluation and Research Unit.

 



[1]Note, this is inclusive of beneficiaries aged 24 years.

[2]Federation members also own 0.9% of deer; 1.9% of sheep; 1.9% of beef cattle, and 0.6% of dairy stock in New Zealand.

 

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 17 April 2015

Treaty Settlements

  • Ngāti Hineuru and the Crown signed a Deed of Settlement on 2 April 2015. The settlement includes $25 million financial and commercial redress, along with cultural redress and a Crown acknowledgement and apology.

Appointments 

  • Sir Harawira Gardiner, Riria Te Kanawa and George Reedy have been appointed to the board of Te Huarahi Tika Trust.  Steve Murray has been appointed as a director to Hautaki Ltd (the commercial subsidiary of Te Huarahi Tika Trust).
  • Rachael Tūwhangai has been appointed to board of the Manukau Institute of Technology.
  • Last Tuesday the Minister for Māori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell, and the Minister of Science and Innovation, Steven Joyce announced three new consortium groups who have been selected to deliver Māori and Pasifika trade training. The new provider consortiums are; Bay of Plenty Polytechnic and Ngā Pōtiki ā Tamapāhore; Taranaki Futures Trust; and Te Pū Wānanga o Anamata.
  • On Monday the Minister of Education, Hekia Parata, announced that $244 million will be allocated in the 2015/16 Budget to fund four new schools, and three new kura kaupapa Māori.  The kura kaupapa will be built in Whakatāne, Gisborne and Hastings.
  • On Wednesday the Minister for Māori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell, and the Minister of Science and Innovation, Steven Joyce, announced the thirteen organisations that will receive Vision Mātauranga Science Funding this year.  In total $1.9 million was allocated across seventeen distinct projects.  The successful organisations and proposals are outlined below
Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited Flounder Enhancement in the Marlborough Sounds $180,000
Institute for Plant and Food Research Te Awanui Huka Pak Innovation $180,000
Institute for Plant and Food Research China consumer insights, a Pathway to Premium for Māori food brands $100,000
NorthTec Scoping the development by Pehiaweri Marae hub & NorthTec of a Tikanga Maori focused digital literacy $180,000
KMAHE Digital Media Platform for Livestreaming, Broadcasting, and Content Management $180,000
AgResearch Te Kakenga Ngātahi i te Ara Poutama $100,000
Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Te Kura Whenua – building an understanding of earth science for informed decision making $100,000
Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Kā Rongo te Hā o Rūaumoko – Understanding the impacts of air pollution $99,900
Landcare Research Strengthening relationships between CRIs of the Te Ara Putaiao (TAP) partnership, Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and Māori landowners, development of a new methodology for risks and potential rewards of land use $100,000
Cawthron Institute Kia Mahitahi – working together to improve water quality and river well-being $100,000
Lincoln University Establishing a National Māori Biosecurity Network $100,000
University of Canterbury O Kahukura, O Marokura: Integrating kaitiaki, science and education $99,900
Te Whāriki Manawāhine o Hauraki, Te Poipoia Tūkino o Hauraki IT applications for the diffusion of mātauranga Māori social norms that are known to reduce the impacts of whānau violence $23,000
New Zealand Forest Research Institute Mātauranga Whakarewarewa – developing tamariki science knowledge for the future $66,000
University of Waikato Te Waka a Tama-rereti: Networking Māori Expertise in Genomics, Informatics and Technology $99,000
Massey University Tūpuna kai – Reconnecting New Zealand Māori with the benefits of traditional food $92,000
Groundtruth Limited Integrating mātauranga and science for land management that provides economic growth and supports biodiversity $95,000

 

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 27 March 2015 (edition 9/2015)

 

  • Last Thursday the Members’ Bill of Meka Whaitiri was drawn from the ballot in parliament, and is now lodged on the Parliamentary Order Paper.[1] The bill is the Environmental Protection Authority (Protection of Environment) Amendment Bill.  Ms Whaitiri proposes to insert a new objective in the Environment Protection Authority Act 2011 to ensure the Authority must, “aim to protect, maintain and enhance New Zealand’s environment”.  In her view, this extended definition of purpose is required to ensure the Authority always puts environmental considerations ahead of other matters.  National Party Minister for the Environment, Nick Smith, however, considers that adding such words is superfluous, given the Authority’s sole purpose is to consider environmental matters.  He has indicated the Government will therefore vote against the bill.

    We have previously advised on provisions within this legislation area, particularly in relation to Māori and iwi concerns and submissions (Pānui 7/2012 refers).  Our assessment has been that this legislation underserves Māori.  In part this is because the Māori Advisory Committee established within the Act has a weak legislative mandate as it is unable to make binding recommendations on any party.  The Committee provides case-by-case considerations upon request, is advisory only, and is effectively toothless.  Accordingly from a Māori policy perspective there is scope to improve the legislative framework to better reflect Māori needs and aspirations.  It is then surprising that Ms Whaitiri, who is the parliamentarian representing Ika Rāwhiti constituents – i.e. she represents Māori only – appears to have excluded matters which impact on Māori from her sole legislative proposal.

Appointments 

  • Hinurewa Poutu and Dr Ruka Broughton have been appointed to the board of the Māori Language Commission / Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori.
  • Last week Te Puni Kōkiri launched Te Whakahura a Kupe, a web-based socio demographic database tool which disaggregates census data via iwi and rohe.  The database includes 98 iwi, and data sets available include various health, education, employment and housing information collected from both the 2006 and 2013 censuses.  (I.e. how many people of a particular iwi have employment, own their home, have tertiary qualifications, etc).  In our view this is a particularly useful tool for researchers and policy advisors, it can be viewed here:

    http://kupe.tpk.govt.nz/

  • On Wednesday Miraka received the inaugural ‘He Kai Kei Aku Ringa – Māori Excellence in Export’ award at the 2015 New Zealand International Business Awards.
  • This week the Annual General Meeting of Te Ohu Kaimoana was held.  Reports of the financial returns of both Aotearoa Fisheries and Sealord have arisen from this meeting, but are not yet publicly available. (We will review when published.)
  • On Thursday three finalist for the 2015 Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming Award for sheep and beef were announced.  The finalist are Mangaroa Station (located north-west of Wairoa) Paua Station (located north of Kaitaia) and Maranga Station (located south-west of Gisborne).  The winner will be named at the Awards dinner on May 29 in Whanganui.
  • Today Ngāruahine will receive an apology from the Crown for illegally incarcerating iwi members in the South Island during the 1880s.
  • On 30-31 March Te Wānanga o Raukawa and the Māori Unit within the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (Te Wāhanga) will co-hosting a forum on rangatiratanga; entitled ‘Kei Tua o te Pae’.  Details can be found here:

    http://www.nzcer.org.nz/events/kei-tua-hui

  • This week legal action between a grouping of former board members of Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Whāngaroa and the Ministry of Education has been withdrawn.  (The legal challenge arose from the removal of the school board in 2013).  By way of background, in June 2014 the Secretary of Education and Chief Executive of the Ministry of Education, Peter Hughes, dissolved the Board, and replaced it with a commissioner.  This action followed significant student / whanau exit from the school; concerns about an inappropriate relationship between a former principal (Louisa Mutu) and a student; and concerns that board elections were not held in accordance with Education Act (allegedly no formal advertisements, only school newsletter information and letters).

    The former board members objected to the need for a commissioner, indicating that they had address the conduct of the former principal appropriately, and had advertised elections in a means suitable their community.  They also objected to the commissioner appointed, Mr Larry Forbes.  Accordingly they had originally been seeking a High Court injunction against the interventions.  However in December 2014 Hōhepa Campbell took over the commissioner role and new board elections were facilitated this year.  Election results are now pending.  (Pānui 21/2014 refers.)



[1] By way of background, Members’ Bills are proposed changes to legislation lodged by individual members of parliament.  Members are allowed to lodge one bill each of their own design (i.e. it is not required to be a ‘party policy’ bill).  If the bill is drawn in the parliamentary ballot then it is placed on the Order Paper (i.e. parliamentary agenda), and will receive at least a first reading in parliament, and be voted on at that point.