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Tags: He Poutama Rangatahi

E3 Salient Māori News Items to 12 February 2021

  • The Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, Carmel Sepuloni, has announced a new $5.7 million contestable fund to support Māori with projects that safeguard their mātauranga and taonga on marae, from the ongoing threat of COVID-19. She states,

“The Mātauranga Māori Marae Ora Fund offers support for a range of marae-based projects.  This includes the development of conservation plans for whare and wharenui arts, the establishment of harvest areas for cultural materials such as pā harakeke and tōtara, and the preservation of taonga such as waka tīwai, korowai and photographs.  Funding is also available to assist with the creation of archives, small whare taonga or publications as a way to both preserve and provide access to mātauranga and taonga on marae.”

https://www.communitymatters.govt.nz/the-matauranga-maori-marae-ora-fund

  • Minister Sepuloni, in her role as Minister for Social Development, also announced $2,65 million in funding for three further initiatives under the He Poutama Rangatahi schedule (an initiative to support youth into education or employment). The programmes receiving funding are:
    • Bros For Change Charitable Trust; $1.55 million to support 60 rangatahi over three years;
    • Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangatira; $800,000 to support 60 rangatahi over two years; and
    • Talent Rise Foundation (NZ); $300,000 to support 45 young people over two years.
  • Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei held a protest march this week against the Crown’s approach of offering redress to other iwi from areas in which they consider they have exclusive tangata whenua rights. The High Court hearing on the matter commences this week.  (Pānui 19/2015 refers.)
  • Earlier in the week Māori Party Member of Parliament, Rawiri Waititi, was order to leave Parliament’s debating chamber after refusing to wear a necktie – but following that the rules got changed, to better accommodate a broader range of culturally appropriate attire.

E1 29 January 2021: Māori news

 

  • Last Saturday, Māori Academic, Dr Mānuka Henare, passed away aged 78 years. We acknowledge Dr Henare for his professionalism and guidance.  E te rangatira, e moe, e moe i roto i te manaakitanga katoa.
  • The Serious Fraud Office has brought fraud charges against Roger Pikia, Mr Pikia has been charged with ‘Obtaining by deception’; ‘Corrupt acceptance of gift by an agent’; ‘Receiving a secret reward for procuring a contract’; ‘Perverting the course of justice’; and ‘Conspiracy to commit an offence’. The charges are in relation to his former role as chairman of Te Arawa River Iwi Trust (TARIT) and its investment company THL Limited (THL). Mr Pikia has indicated he will be defending the charges; and we remind us all that under the Bill of Rights Act people are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.
  • On December 16, the interim report on the Abuse in Care Royal Commission of Inquiry was published. The report entitled Tāwharautia: Pūrongo o te Wā summarises the Inquiry’s work to date.  We are considering this item for further review.
  • Most Government agencies have now released their ‘BIMs’ – briefings to incoming Ministers. We are reviewing key items pertinent to Māori policy and intent to subscribers on these matters over the coming weeks.
  • This year’s annual Rātana Church celebrations (held 22 – 25 January) was open to church members only and did not accommodate political party leaders as it had in previous years. Internal issues have been cited as the reason for the closed celebration. The event celebrates the birthday of the Māori prophet and Rātana Church founder, Tahupōtiki Wīremu Rātana, (1873-1939).
  • This week MediaWorks terminated its contract with John Banks as a talk back radio host, after Mr Banks appeared to agree and support a caller who stated that Māori were “stone age people with a stone age culture” and “genetically predisposed to crime, alcohol addiction and educational underperformance.” As a talk back host Mr Banks was expected to shutdown racist tripe but did the opposite.  He has not apologised for his inaction but has stated he is not racist.  (Mr Banks is a former Auckland Mayor and former National Party Cabinet Minister.)
  • In December the Minister for Social Development and Employment, Carmel Sepuloni, announced the successful organisations which have been awarded He Poutama Rangatahi funding. The purpose of He Poutama Rangatahi is to increase long-term employment opportunities for Māori and Pacific rangatahi. Statistics NZ data indicates there are circa 28,000 Māori aged 15 to 24 years not in any education, training or employment (Pānui 37/2020 refers.)  The total funding awarded is circa $4 million. The successful organisations are listed on the following page.
    Organisation Location Programme Brief Funding
    Te Ara Rangatahi Charitable Trust Franklin, Waikato 12-month programme includes intensive pastoral care with a strong focus on building participants’ cultural identity and connections. The programme will support 60 rangatahi  onto employment pathways in  the trade industries, particularly scaffolding. $639,000
    Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga Trust Hastings/ Hawke’s Bay Extension of two years for Learners 2 Earners – Takatū Youth Mentoring Programme.  A programme which supports 53 Hastings rangatahi into further education or employment. The programme also provides intensive support for 180 rangatahi, helping them gain driver licences with passenger, forklift, heavy trade, wheels, and tracks and rollers endorsements. $390,000
    The Limery Napier/ Hawke’s Bay 20 rangatahi will receive on the job training in the citrus and horticultural sector. In addtion the programme will provide general employment skills and pastoral support. $200,000
    Aotearoa Social Enterprise Trust Tairāwhiti Two year extension of the ASET Poutama Rangatahi pre-employment training programme. The programme will assist 60 young people in Kaiti. $850,000
    Nga Hau E Wha Maara Kai Charitable Trust Taumarunui Hands on employment readiness and entrepreneurial skills programme for 40 participants.  The programme is a

    tikanga-based education in maara kai (vegetable growing and community gardening) and Te Haemata (native nursery and commercial practices). Participants also receive pastoral care and practical learning in areas such as beekeeping, riparian planting, horticulture, sustainability practices and managing community projects.

    $513,000
    Muaūpoko Tribal Authority Horowhenua Tō Ake Ara Tātou will enable 48 young people in the Horowhenua region to discover their potential, build confidence and access the support and tools needed to succeed. Participants receive pastoral care and experience in volunteer work, cultural activities, environmental stewardship, caring for kaumātua or other whanau, and pre-employment training such as budgeting and drivers’ licensing. $765,000
    Kāpiti Coast District Council Ōtaki/ Kāpati Coast Extension of Te Hunga Rangatahi, an existing in-school programme targeting 70 Ōtaki rangatahi who are not in employment, education or training (NEET), and who are most at risk of long-term unemployment. The council will sub-contract Work Ready Kāpiti to provide skills training and work experience, and Te Puna Oranga o Ōtaki to provide pastoral support services. $995,000

E34 Salient Māori News Items to 27 September 2019

  • Judge Heemi Taumaunu (Ngāti Pōrou, Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed Chief District Court Judge.
  • Verity Webber (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Māmoe) and Kauahi Ngapora (Waikato Tainui, Ngāi Tahu) have been appointed independent members of the International Visitor Conservation and Tourism Levy Advisory Group.
  • Yesterday Te Tumu Paeroa and Te Puni Kōkiri entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to jointly work together to support and fund Māori housing repairs in the Te Tai Tokerau and Te Tai Rāwhiti regions. Te Puni Kōkiri has the regional staffing base to oversee administration, and Te Tumu Paeroa will commit $2 million towards the programme.  This is of course positive for those who will benefit from the work, although our questions (see article above) around making decisions about other people’s money remain.[1]
  • On Thursday the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment released the draft ‘New Zealand’s Research, Science & Innovation Strategy’, Feedback and submissions on the draft are now open, until 10 November 2019. The Ministry will also hold a series of consultation workshops during October.  For further detail refer to links below. https://mbie.wufoo.com/forms/research-science-innovation-strategy/ https://www.mbie.govt.nz/dmsdocument/6935-new-zealands-research-science-and innovation-strategy-draft-for-consultation
  • Ngāi Tahu has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Kataoka Corporation/Sankou Foods (of Japan), to turn Undaria/ Wakame seaweed into a high-value product. This partnership will generate jobs in the East Otago region.
  • This week Statistics New Zealand announced that at the next general election the number of electorates will increase from seventy-one to seventy two, to reflect population growth. There will still be seven Māori electorates.  (The Māori electoral population is 473,077, up 12 percent from 2013.)[2].  Note one extra electorate seat means one less party list seat in the next Parliament.
  • This week the Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson, announced that Wairoa Young Achievers Trust (WYAT) will receive funding of $305,000 to support rangatahi into employment and education in Wairoa. The funding is from the He Poutama Rangatahi

[1] Note Te Tumu Paeroa does recieve an annual Crown allocation of circa $11 million however that is for administration purposes, so funds for this initiative will be sourced from the General Fund.

[2] Electoral populations were calculated using data from the electoral rolls (following the Māori Electoral Option 2018), and results from the 2018 Census of Population and Dwellings.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 22 June E21/2018

  • Tini Clark (Ngāti Tīpa, Ngāti Tahinga, Ngāti Āmaru) has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury warrant to be based in Manukau. Ms Clark will be sworn in as a Judge on 10 August 2018.
  • Last Friday the Minister of Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, announced that an investigation into the affairs of the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board is to be undertaken. The investigation follows reported allegations relating to governance and management concerns, and in particular the 2017 triennial elections of the Board.  Michael Heron QC has been appointed as the investigator, and will report back to the Minister in August.   The Trust Board comprises twelve trustees elected from the six hapū of Whakatōhea, and there are circa 11,000 iwi members.
  • Today the Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson, announced four initiatives that will receive funding through He Poutama Rangatahi. All four initiatives are based in the Hawke’s Bay region.

The successful initiatives are:

The Hastings District Council – Connector Model programme (improving long term employment opportunities through supporting employers, rangatahi and their whānau) funding $460,000;

Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga – Takatū Youth Mentoring (drivers licencing programme) funding $258,000;

Hikoi4Life Trust  – WorkFit programme  (increase existing support to get young people physically and mentally fit for work)  funding $765,000; and

Hikoi4Life Trust – Development Hub (work readiness programme to support  young Māori and Pasifika women into employment) funding $194,000.

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/17-million-investment-hawkes-bay-rangatahi

  • Law Firm Kahui legal have made a commitment across the organisation to increase staff use of Te Reo Māori as part of their Reo Plan. The plan supports staff to take lessons outside of work. Reo Plan is an initiative developed by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori/ Māori Language Commission to encourage workplaces to increase use of Te Reo Māori.
  • On Tuesday the Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, announced his interim decision to cancel the Hato Petera College integration agreement (there are few students enrolled so the school is not considered sustainable). This means, unless there is convincing evidence otherwise, shortly the Minister will confirm his decision, which will effectively close the school.
  • Earlier this month Sir Robert Jones filed defamation papers against Renae Maihi. Sir Robert Jones claims the language used in that petition was defamatory. In March Ms Maihi presented the petition to Labour MP Kiritapu Allan at Parliament, which asks the Prime Minister to strip Sir Robert Jones of his Knighthood, on the basis of alleged inflammatory comments made about Māori. The petition had 66,000 people in support.  A GiveALittle page has been established to support Ms Maihi’s defence.

https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/legal-fund-for-renae-maihi

  • On Thursday funding applications opened for Suffrage 125 fund. The contestable fund is worth $300,000 and its purpose is to support events and activities to celebrate 125 years of voting for women. Activities recognising Māori women, and women of diverse cultures, will be a focus.

http://women.govt.nz/suffrage125fund

  • The Horizons Regional Council (Manawatū-Wanganui region) has voted to change the spelling of Wanganui to Whanganui in their name, and they will add a macron over the u in Manawatū. The Council have applied to the Geographic Board for the change.
  • Matariki celebrations are now well underway in various locations around Aotearoa, with the Wellington Mayor, Justin Lester, suggesting a public holiday may be required. Matariki is the rising of a cluster of eight bright stars in midwinter (from May this year); and celebrations are often timed with the appearance of the first new moon (mid-June this year).