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Tags: Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga

Edition 38, Salient Māori News Items to 2 November 2018

  • Stacey Morrison (Ngāi Tahu, Te Arawa) has been appointed to the Ministerial Advisory Group on Public Media.
  • Martin Enright (Ngāti Pākehā) has been awarded a 2019 Winston Churchill Fellowship. Mr Enright will study targeted procurement policies in organisations in Canada and the United States of America to inform and support Māori economic empowerment in Tāmaki Makaurau and Aotearoa.
  • On Monday Te Whakatōhea Mussels celebrated the expansion of their mussel farm operations by holding a launch for their newest vessel, named Kukutai. The new vessel will help grow Te Whakatōhea Mussels’ existing annual harvest from 1,500 tonnes to up to 6,000 tonnes. The company is also awaiting consent to build an Opōtiki based processing factory. When the factory opens it will create employment opportunities for residents.
  • The Kawerau Putauaki Trust Industrial Development will receive $2 million from the Provincial Growth Fund to develop roading and other infrastructure required to support the regions’ primary industries.
  • This week the Overseas Investment Office approved Chinese company Guangxi Fenglin Wood Industry Group’s application to lease 33 hectares of land and build a wood particle board factory in Kawerau. The land is owned by Putauaki Trust. The factory will create employment for up to 100.
  • Ohia Bentham (Ngāi Te Rangi, Ngāti Pūkenga, Ngāti Ranginui, Te Āti Awa, Ngāti Rārua) has been appointed the Māori Party Vice President (tāne).
  • Ngāi Tahu Property will enter a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Queenstown Lakes District Council to explore development options in the Queenstown CBD.
  • This week the Ministry of Education published an Early Childhood Education Attendance report for 2017. The report showed that overall, 65.5% of children aged 0 to 4 years in New Zealand attended an early childhood education service. For tamariki Māori, 17% attended a Kōhanga reo, 58% attended a teacher lead education and care service, 15% attended kindergarten and 7% attended home-based services.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/188238/Understanding-attendance-results-from-the-2017-Early-Childhood-Education-census-v4.pdf

  • This week applications for the 2019 Te Pūnaha Hihiko: Vision Mātauranga Capability Fund opened. Up to $4 million in funding is available for people and organisations undertaking or planning research which supports the four themes of the Vision Mātauranga Policy:
    • indigenous innovation;
    • taiao (achieving environmental sustainability);
    • hauora/oranga (improving health and social wellbeing); and
    • mātauranga (exploring indigenous knowledge).

Applications close 12 noon, 19 February 2019.

https://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/science-innovation/funding-info-opportunities/investment-funds/vmcf/application-and-assessment-information

  • This week Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) – New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence announced nine research projects of investment:

http://www.maramatanga.ac.nz/projects

Māori news stories for the week ending 10 August 2012

  • This week the Treaty Tribes Coalition and the Māori Fisheries Trust held the seventh National Māori Fisheries Conference in Auckland.  The conference focussed on fisheries trading in the present economic climate, and on sector regulatory changes. (Notable regulatory changes include the pending prohibition on the use of foreign-chartered vessels; refer to pānui E17/2012 for details.)
  • On Wednesday the Court of Appeal dismissed the legal challenge from the ‘Independent Purchaser Group’ (a consortium led by Sir Michael Fay), to prevent the sale of the sixteen former Crafar dairy farms to Shanghai Pengxin.  Māori interests (from Ngāti Rereahu and Tūwharetoa) involved in the challenge have ruled out any further legal action.
  • Last Wednesday Te Uri o Hau and the Northland Regional Council signed a memorandum of understanding.  The memorandum confirms a role for Te Uri o Hau in environmental, economic and social matters within the purview of the Council.
  • Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga  have commissioned researchers from the University of Canterbury to study and identify the qualities which make high achieving Te Arawa students successful learners.  The study, Ka Awatea, will be completed in 2014.
  • The Human Rights Commission is consulting on the meaning of ‘rangatiratanga’, in the context of modern Aotearoa / New Zealand.   Further information is available on their website.
  • On Wednesday a financial recovery plan was announced for Rata Te Āwhina Trust.  The Trust is a Whānau Ora provider, which was  placed under the control of a change manager in July, after an independent report identified issues of mismanagement. 

Māori News Stories for the week ending 6 July 2012

  • Last Wednesday Nelson-based Wakatū Incorporation lost a High Court claim against the Crown for claimed breaches of fiduciary duty, and good faith in its dealings with the Māori owners of land in the Nelson and Motueka regions.  The decision allows the Crown to proceed with Treaty settlements with iwi groupings at the top of the South Island.
  • Last Friday a high court judge granted Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust the right to deliver (temporarily) the Family Start programme.  A full hearing into the Ministry of Social Development decision to terminate Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust Family Start programme will be held in August.  The Trust has also called a meeting of other Māori social sector providers to discuss a potential Treaty of Waitangi claim against the Crown, alleging that contractual terms and conditions are unjust.
  • On Monday the Minister for Climate Change Issues, Tim Groser, announced amendments to New Zealand’s Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).  Among the changes is provision to retain the allocation of second tranche compensation for forest owners, where off-setting is not taken up.  This policy will be of significant interest to Māori forest-owners.   (For further details refer to Pānui E11/2012.)
  • This week Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (a Māori Centre of Research Excellence) published a first edition of Mai Journal: A New Zealand journal of Indigenous Scholarship.  The publication will be biannual.
  • On Tuesday an application for bail for Tame Iti and Te Rangikaiwhiria Kemara (two of the Urewera four) was heard in the Court of Appeal, Wellington.  The men are seeking bail while they wait to have an appeal hearing against their convictions for their involvement in military style camps in Te Urewera National Park in 2007.
  • On Wednesday Orete Incorporation was fined $45,000 for polluting a stream with dairy effluent near Waihau Bay last September.

Key Māori news stories for the week ending 22 June 2012

  • On Monday Nga Pae o te Maramatanga (the Māori-focused Centre of Research Excellence), announced funding for six projects:
  • Investigation into the fisheries resources and interests of iwi, hapū and marae within Tauranga Moana and the impacts caused by the grounding of the CV Rena (Associate Professor Paul Kayes, Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi)
  • Networks of support for Māori mental health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through Ōtautahi earthquakes (Dr Simon Lambert, Lincoln University, )
  • Ka Awatea: An iwi case study of Maori student experiencing success (Professor Angus Macfarlane, University of Canterbury)
  • Indigenous agroecology (Dr Marion Johnson, University of Otago)
  • Tiakina Te Pā Harakeke: Māori childrearing within a context of whānau ora (Dr Leonie Pihama, University of Waikato)
  • Aue Ha! Māori men’s relational health (Mohi Rua and Professor Darrin Hodgetts, University of Waikato)
  • Humphrey Wikeepa has been appointed to the board of Network for Learning Limited, a new Crown-owned company.
  • Last Wednesday an Iwi Education Authority was established, to ‘improve achievement of tamariki and mokopuna’. Twenty-three kura are reported associated with the initiative.
  • A number of Māori providers have been successful in gaining contracts, (or have become preferred bidders), for the supervision and care of young beneficiaries as a part of the welfare reforms. (Refer pānui 2 March E6/2012 for details, i.e. the outsourcing and extension of the former Youth Transition Service). Māori providers includes Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Porou (Gisborne), Te Rūnanga o Turanganui a Kiwa (Gisborne), Tui Ora (Taranaki), Whai Marama (a division of Te Rūnanga o Kirikiriroa) (Hamilton), Solomon Group (Manurewa), and Ngāti Hine Health Trust (Whangarei).
  • On Thursday Urs Signer and Emily Bailey (two members of the ‘Urewera Four’) were sentenced to nine months home detention for a range of firearms charges. Signer and Bailey have indicated that they will appeal their sentences.