Enter your keyword

Tags: Tuhoronuku

E38 Salient Māori News Items to 1 November 2019

 

  • Hone Sadler has reportedly stood down as the chair of Tūhoronuku. (Tūhoronuku is the Treaty settlement trust of Ngāpuhi; which the present Minister, Andrew Little, has indicated does not have a clear mandate to proceed with settlement processes in its current form). The resignation is said to have occurred some weeks back, and appears to have followed the sudden resignation of Sonny Tau from the Chair of Te Rūnanga a Iwi o Ngāpuhi last month.  No public explanations have been given for this.  Mr James Clyde is the new chair of Tūhoronuku.
  • This week the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care commenced public hearings.  We advise the inquiry will consider “the nature and extent of abuse that occurred in state care and faith based institutes (between 1950 and 1999), what its immediate and long term impacts were, the factors (including systemic factors) which may have caused or contributed to it, and lessons to be learned from the past.”   A key focus remains on understanding any differential impacts of abuse in state care for Māori.  We note Mr Moana Jackson has been giving evidence on the impact of colonisation on fostering conditions for the abuse of Māori children in care.
  • The Waitangi Tribunal has granted an urgent hearing into child uplift policy at Oranga Tamariki . This follows significant Māori concern around the policy, sparked from an uplift attempt in Hastings in March.  The claim was lodged by Dr Rawiri Waretini-Karena, Dr Jane Alison Green, and Kerri Nuku.  Amongst other items they claim that the Crown has breached the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi by failing to protect Māori from the increasing and disproportionate rates of Māori children taken into state care and failing to take reasonable steps to address the institutional racism.  Meanwhile, the whānau of the baby involved that sparked the concerns has refused to participate in an internal review of the matter, indicating a lack of trust in Oranga Tamariki.  (We consider that without their participation a reasonable review process would be near impossible.)   Pānui 21/2019 and 27/2019 refer.
  • On Tuesday the Minister for Regional Economic Development, Shane Jones, announced that three Parihaka Pa Marae will be upgraded to high speed broadband via the Māori Digital Connectivity programme which is funded by the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF).
  • On Monday Te Pūtake o te Riri, He Rā Maumahara, a commemoration of the New Zealand wars and conflicts between Māori and the Crown, were held in Waitara.
  • Independent Commissioners have granted the Wellington Company resource consent for a housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay, Wellington. Several groups have been opposed to the development including a group  called Mau Whenua, who consider that their Trust board, the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust, was wrong to sell their land for the development, without explicit iwi consent. They continue to seek legal remedy to overturn the land sales.
  • On Wednesday the National Party held a launch for their Social Services Discussion Document, called the Social Services Discussion Document. The 56-page document outlines the National Party’s proposals on several social issues along with proposed approaches they will introduce if they win the 2020 general election.  Issues raised included a review of Whānau ora, reintroducing some of the benefit sanctions which were removed by the current Government, and “cracking down hard” on gangs.  They suggest welfare payments could be withheld from gang members if found to be receiving other illegal income.  As this is a proposal (and not National Party policy) we have not reviewed this material in full.

https://www.national.org.nz/social_services