Enter your keyword

Tags: Whakatohea Māori Trust Board

Salient Māori News Items for the week ending E35, 5 October 2018

 

  • Professor Cindy Kiro (Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Hine) has been appointed Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of Auckland.
  • Ross Wilson (Ngāi Tahu) has been appointed Chair of the WorkSafe New Zealand Board.
  • Karis Knight (Ngāti Porou) has been awarded the New Zealand Psychological Society Karahipi Tumuaki Scholarship. Ms Knight (University of Auckland student) has focused her research on the effect of whakamā (shame or embarrassment) on Māori mental health.
  • Last month the Ministry of Justice published a factsheet on Adult Conviction and Sentencing for the year ending 30 June 2018. In 2017/18 circa 75,500 adults were charged with a crime, and 83% of charges resulted in a conviction. The most salient population disparity is via gender, with 78% of convictions relating to males.  There is also a significant difference between Māori and non-Māori conviction rates, with 41% of all convicted adults being Māori.

https://www.justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/adults-convicted-and-sentenced-data-highlights-june-2018.pdf

  • On Monday Mahuru Youth Remand Service was launched in Kaikohe. The service which will be rolled out across the Taitokerau region is a collaboration between Ngāpuhi Iwi Social Services and Oranga Tamariki.
  • On Monday the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) was launched. The Government’s aspiration is that the agency will help reduce homelessness and improve housing affordability. The agency brings together housing policy, funding and regulatory functions from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, the Ministry of Social Development and The Treasury.  (Housing is a significant issue for Māori with over a third of Housing NZ tenants identifying as Māori, Māori home ownership being 35% and Māori being over-represented within the grouping of families without suitable housing; refer Pānui E24/2018).
  • Last Friday the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, advised she has received the report into the investigation into the affairs of the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, had considered the findings and recommendations, and written to the Board to implement the recommendations. What she did not do, however, is address the public interest in this matter by releasing the report, nor advising what the findings and recommendations were.   We consider that unacceptably poor judgement from this Minister, as this Board is a statutory entity established by the Parliament of New Zealand, in receipt of public funds, and supposedly monitored by Te Puni Kōkiri (i.e. it is not a private entity).  Minister Mahuta’s approach goes against the messaging of open and transparent government which we note is being espoused by the Prime Minister.    The investigation followed allegations relating to governance and management concerns, and in particular the 2017 triennial elections of the Board.    Fortunately, however, the Trust Board itself has acted with greater awareness of stewardship duties than the Minister, and has publicly released the report.  Accordingly, we will advise on it further in Pānui edition 36/2018.

[Note: we further advise that voting has opened for members of Whakatōhea iwi to choose to continue the current settlement process led by the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claims Trust, or alternatively restart the mandating process. Voting ends 26 October.   Refer Pānui 13/2018 for details.]

  • On Monday the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) released a report entitled Maiea Te Tūruapō, Fulfilling the Vision. The report is based on the OCC’s independent monitoring of Oranga Tamariki policies, practices and services: in particular the current practice of placing young people in large secure residences. This report is particularly important to Māori, given 63% of the circa 5,000 children and young people in State care situations are Māori (circa 3,100).  We will provide a review of this report Pānui E36/2018.

Registrations are now open for the Federation of Māori Authorities Conference, to be held: Friday 2 – Sunday 4 November, Emerald

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 22 June E21/2018

  • Tini Clark (Ngāti Tīpa, Ngāti Tahinga, Ngāti Āmaru) has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury warrant to be based in Manukau. Ms Clark will be sworn in as a Judge on 10 August 2018.
  • Last Friday the Minister of Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, announced that an investigation into the affairs of the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board is to be undertaken. The investigation follows reported allegations relating to governance and management concerns, and in particular the 2017 triennial elections of the Board.  Michael Heron QC has been appointed as the investigator, and will report back to the Minister in August.   The Trust Board comprises twelve trustees elected from the six hapū of Whakatōhea, and there are circa 11,000 iwi members.
  • Today the Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson, announced four initiatives that will receive funding through He Poutama Rangatahi. All four initiatives are based in the Hawke’s Bay region.

The successful initiatives are:

The Hastings District Council – Connector Model programme (improving long term employment opportunities through supporting employers, rangatahi and their whānau) funding $460,000;

Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga – Takatū Youth Mentoring (drivers licencing programme) funding $258,000;

Hikoi4Life Trust  – WorkFit programme  (increase existing support to get young people physically and mentally fit for work)  funding $765,000; and

Hikoi4Life Trust – Development Hub (work readiness programme to support  young Māori and Pasifika women into employment) funding $194,000.

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/17-million-investment-hawkes-bay-rangatahi

  • Law Firm Kahui legal have made a commitment across the organisation to increase staff use of Te Reo Māori as part of their Reo Plan. The plan supports staff to take lessons outside of work. Reo Plan is an initiative developed by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori/ Māori Language Commission to encourage workplaces to increase use of Te Reo Māori.
  • On Tuesday the Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, announced his interim decision to cancel the Hato Petera College integration agreement (there are few students enrolled so the school is not considered sustainable). This means, unless there is convincing evidence otherwise, shortly the Minister will confirm his decision, which will effectively close the school.
  • Earlier this month Sir Robert Jones filed defamation papers against Renae Maihi. Sir Robert Jones claims the language used in that petition was defamatory. In March Ms Maihi presented the petition to Labour MP Kiritapu Allan at Parliament, which asks the Prime Minister to strip Sir Robert Jones of his Knighthood, on the basis of alleged inflammatory comments made about Māori. The petition had 66,000 people in support.  A GiveALittle page has been established to support Ms Maihi’s defence.

https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/legal-fund-for-renae-maihi

  • On Thursday funding applications opened for Suffrage 125 fund. The contestable fund is worth $300,000 and its purpose is to support events and activities to celebrate 125 years of voting for women. Activities recognising Māori women, and women of diverse cultures, will be a focus.

http://women.govt.nz/suffrage125fund

  • The Horizons Regional Council (Manawatū-Wanganui region) has voted to change the spelling of Wanganui to Whanganui in their name, and they will add a macron over the u in Manawatū. The Council have applied to the Geographic Board for the change.
  • Matariki celebrations are now well underway in various locations around Aotearoa, with the Wellington Mayor, Justin Lester, suggesting a public holiday may be required. Matariki is the rising of a cluster of eight bright stars in midwinter (from May this year); and celebrations are often timed with the appearance of the first new moon (mid-June this year).