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Tags: Racism

E7 Salient Māori News Items to 12 March 2021

 

  • Racism appears as a feature in the news this week. Setting aside major headlines around the Royal Family, there is also a minor article about a urologist at the national conference saying, in a panel presentation, that because ‘many Māori men are in prison’ there should not be a problem with reluctance to digital rectal examinations by Māori males to screen for prostate cancer, “as there is so much rectal probing, so ‘they’ could do their own examinations”. So, not just an example of overt racism and homophobia, but another example of direct prejudice within health service delivery.  The unnamed urologist has now apologised.
  • Associate Health Minister, Peeni Henare, has announced that $39 million is being put towards a targeted Māori COVID-19 vaccination strategy, including circa $25 million for Māori health providers to deliver services. The vaccine framework would provide for 40,000 courses of the vaccine to be given to Māori and Pacific older people – and the family members they live with (noting that many older people live with whānau rather than in retirement villages).   Minister Henare’s view is “this whānau-centred approach means that an entire whānau can be vaccinated all together and will help to keep our people safe.”  This service is said to be scheduled within the second stage of the vaccination rollout.
  • (As noted above) in December the Ministry of Health reissued its COVID resilience plan, called Kia Kaha, Kia Māia, Kia Ora Aotearoa – Psychosocial and Mental Wellbeing Plan (Refer Pānui 11/2020 refers). Despite the name the work does not have a significant Māori focus, rather it’s mostly just a list of actions within existing work programmes in central agencies which are centred on wellbeing.  So useful for a person, like a Cabinet Minister perhaps, who wants to get a handle of what programmes exist where.  In regards to Māori content, page 8 is the main reference, which states that upholding Te Tiriti is a core service principle.  Then there is reference to the Ministry’s new Te Tiriti framework (Pānui 29/2020 refers), and a reiteration of how Te Tiriti principles can be demonstrated during the COVID crisis via (i) better support for Māori organisations responding to COVID, (ii) enabling Māori to utilise mātauranga Māori approaches, (iii) adopting holistic welling approaches, and (iv) monitoring services to ensure good outcomes for Māori communities.   All up a light touch report which could mean a whole lot or next to nothing in terms of improving Māori mental health outcomes.
  • Te Aho o Te Kahu / the Cancer Control Agency has released its first report on ‘the State of Cancer in New Zealand’. In regards to Māori its findings are similar to the Ministry of Health.  Namely that “the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Māori are breast, lung, prostate and colorectal cancers.”   They also find that “the cancers that disproportionately affect Māori tend both to be highly preventable and to have poor prognoses”.   Cancers are said to reflect disproportionately high rates of tobacco exposure, chronic infections, factors associated with obesity, alcohol use and occupational exposures.   Linkages to socio-economic deprivation (poor nutrition, overcrowding, etc) are also made to provide a wider context than a simple focus on individual risk factors.

https://teaho.govt.nz/static/reports/state-of-cancer-in-new-zealand-2020.pdf

  • The Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee has published their 14th annual review report. They found babies of Māori, Pacific and Indian mothers aged less than 20 years were still more likely than babies of NZ European mothers to die in pregnancy, or within the first 28 days.  Overall, for the ten-year period to 2018, they found 31% of premature baby deaths were Māori. The recommend Health Boards work more closely with women in communities to reduce mortality rates.

report-pmmrc-14th.pdf (hqsc.govt.nz)

 

 

E2 Salient Māori News Items to 05 February 2021

 

  • There have been a number of media reports this week regarding allegations of institutional racism at Unitec / Te Whare Wānanga o Wairaka. Tui Ah Loo, who was the Chair of the institute’s independent Māori rūnanga, has resigned in protest (she had also been a long-time staff member, and her whānau has had significant involvement with the institute. One allegation noted in the media is that there are now no Māori involved in the management of the organisation, and another is that Māori viewpoints are not being genuinely heard.  These claims follow separate allegations of racism at Waikato University last year, and debate on the Otago University ‘Mirror on Society’ policy (Pānui 34/2020 refers).[1]
  • This week the National Party has indicated that it will work towards standing candidates in the Māori electorate seats again. This was perhaps a message party leader, Judith Collins, was considering reiterating at Waitangi, however due to logistical confusions (not a ban on woman leaders speaking) the opportunity for her to present the idea more fully did not arise.
  • As noted earlier Matariki is to become a public holiday. To figure out when each year, and to provide wider guidance, the Government has established a Matariki Advisory Group.   Members are Professor Rangiānehu Mātāmua (chair), Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, Rereata Makiha, Victoria Campbell, Dr Pauline Harris, Dr Ruakere Hond and Jack Thatcher.
  • Shadrach Rolleston has been appointed as one of four commissioners to lead the Tauranga City Council.

[1] Note: the primary producer of Pānui, Will Workman, has a potential conflict of interest in regards to this matter.  Because of that any analysis of this situation undertaken by Pānui will be undertaken by a separate analyst/writer.

E1 29 January 2021: Māori news

 

  • Last Saturday, Māori Academic, Dr Mānuka Henare, passed away aged 78 years. We acknowledge Dr Henare for his professionalism and guidance.  E te rangatira, e moe, e moe i roto i te manaakitanga katoa.
  • The Serious Fraud Office has brought fraud charges against Roger Pikia, Mr Pikia has been charged with ‘Obtaining by deception’; ‘Corrupt acceptance of gift by an agent’; ‘Receiving a secret reward for procuring a contract’; ‘Perverting the course of justice’; and ‘Conspiracy to commit an offence’. The charges are in relation to his former role as chairman of Te Arawa River Iwi Trust (TARIT) and its investment company THL Limited (THL). Mr Pikia has indicated he will be defending the charges; and we remind us all that under the Bill of Rights Act people are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.
  • On December 16, the interim report on the Abuse in Care Royal Commission of Inquiry was published. The report entitled Tāwharautia: Pūrongo o te Wā summarises the Inquiry’s work to date.  We are considering this item for further review.
  • Most Government agencies have now released their ‘BIMs’ – briefings to incoming Ministers. We are reviewing key items pertinent to Māori policy and intent to subscribers on these matters over the coming weeks.
  • This year’s annual Rātana Church celebrations (held 22 – 25 January) was open to church members only and did not accommodate political party leaders as it had in previous years. Internal issues have been cited as the reason for the closed celebration. The event celebrates the birthday of the Māori prophet and Rātana Church founder, Tahupōtiki Wīremu Rātana, (1873-1939).
  • This week MediaWorks terminated its contract with John Banks as a talk back radio host, after Mr Banks appeared to agree and support a caller who stated that Māori were “stone age people with a stone age culture” and “genetically predisposed to crime, alcohol addiction and educational underperformance.” As a talk back host Mr Banks was expected to shutdown racist tripe but did the opposite.  He has not apologised for his inaction but has stated he is not racist.  (Mr Banks is a former Auckland Mayor and former National Party Cabinet Minister.)
  • In December the Minister for Social Development and Employment, Carmel Sepuloni, announced the successful organisations which have been awarded He Poutama Rangatahi funding. The purpose of He Poutama Rangatahi is to increase long-term employment opportunities for Māori and Pacific rangatahi. Statistics NZ data indicates there are circa 28,000 Māori aged 15 to 24 years not in any education, training or employment (Pānui 37/2020 refers.)  The total funding awarded is circa $4 million. The successful organisations are listed on the following page.
    Organisation Location Programme Brief Funding
    Te Ara Rangatahi Charitable Trust Franklin, Waikato 12-month programme includes intensive pastoral care with a strong focus on building participants’ cultural identity and connections. The programme will support 60 rangatahi  onto employment pathways in  the trade industries, particularly scaffolding. $639,000
    Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga Trust Hastings/ Hawke’s Bay Extension of two years for Learners 2 Earners – Takatū Youth Mentoring Programme.  A programme which supports 53 Hastings rangatahi into further education or employment. The programme also provides intensive support for 180 rangatahi, helping them gain driver licences with passenger, forklift, heavy trade, wheels, and tracks and rollers endorsements. $390,000
    The Limery Napier/ Hawke’s Bay 20 rangatahi will receive on the job training in the citrus and horticultural sector. In addtion the programme will provide general employment skills and pastoral support. $200,000
    Aotearoa Social Enterprise Trust Tairāwhiti Two year extension of the ASET Poutama Rangatahi pre-employment training programme. The programme will assist 60 young people in Kaiti. $850,000
    Nga Hau E Wha Maara Kai Charitable Trust Taumarunui Hands on employment readiness and entrepreneurial skills programme for 40 participants.  The programme is a

    tikanga-based education in maara kai (vegetable growing and community gardening) and Te Haemata (native nursery and commercial practices). Participants also receive pastoral care and practical learning in areas such as beekeeping, riparian planting, horticulture, sustainability practices and managing community projects.

    $513,000
    Muaūpoko Tribal Authority Horowhenua Tō Ake Ara Tātou will enable 48 young people in the Horowhenua region to discover their potential, build confidence and access the support and tools needed to succeed. Participants receive pastoral care and experience in volunteer work, cultural activities, environmental stewardship, caring for kaumātua or other whanau, and pre-employment training such as budgeting and drivers’ licensing. $765,000
    Kāpiti Coast District Council Ōtaki/ Kāpati Coast Extension of Te Hunga Rangatahi, an existing in-school programme targeting 70 Ōtaki rangatahi who are not in employment, education or training (NEET), and who are most at risk of long-term unemployment. The council will sub-contract Work Ready Kāpiti to provide skills training and work experience, and Te Puna Oranga o Ōtaki to provide pastoral support services. $995,000