Enter your keyword

Social

E14 07 May 2021 – Māori Influenza Vaccination Programme Evaluation

  • The Ministry of Health published More Than Just A Jab: Evaluation Of The Māori Influenza Vaccination Programme As Part Of The COVID-19 Māori Health Response. This report presents the evaluation findings from the 2020 Māori Influenza Vaccination Programme (MIVP). The MIVP was an initiative set up as a direct response to COVID -19, the aim was to increase equity by increasing access to the influenza (flu) vaccine for vulnerable Māori groups who were eligible for free vaccinations i.e., kaumātua aged 65+ years, hapū māmā and Māori with pre-existing health conditions.

Key findings included within the report:

  • Influenza vaccination rates for Māori 65+ increased from 45.8% in 2019 to 59% in 2020.
  • Disparities in vaccinations rates were identified when comparing rates across different DHB regions.

https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/more-just-jab-evaluation-maori-influenza-vaccination-programme-part-covid-19-maori-health-response

E14 Salient Māori News Items to 07 May 2021

  • Last month, a Strategic Partnership Agreement was signed between Ngāti Kahungunu Iwi and Oranga Tamariki. The aim of the agreement is to keep tamariki with whānau, reduce the amount of tamariki in Oranga tamariki care and to create a shift in Oranga Tamariki practice so it better aligns with Ngāti Kahungunu values.
  • This week the Far North District Council voted 7 – 3 in favour of establishing Māori council wards. The Māori wards will be established by the 2022 local government elections.

E13 Salient Māori News Items to 30 April 2021

  • Antoine Coffin has been appointed to the Ministerial Review Panel into the Future for Local Government.
  • This week the Police referred matters concerning donations to the Māori Party to the Serious Fraud Office. It is alleged the Party failed to declare donations or aggregated donations of over $30,000, which combined totalled over $300,000.  The Party has already acknowledged its error.
  • This week the Department of Corrections published (online only) data about people imprisoned as of 31 March 2021. It shows 52.7% of those people are Māori, i.e. 4,561 Māori in prison.  We advise that no textual or further explanation was provided. https://www.corrections.govt.nz/resources/statistics/quarterly_prison_statistics/prison_stats_march_2021b

E8 Salient Māori News Items to 19 March 2021

 

  • One media outlet has run a story which appears to indicate that two Government agencies – the transport agency Waka Kotahi and Heritage New Zealand allegedly colluded to ensure a Taranaki hapū grouping, Poutama, was purposely not properly consulted with on a roading project which affected them. If proved to be true this would suggest legal breaches, and agency conflicts of interest, may exist.  Again, we consider this is the type of matter that a strong Te Puni Kōkiri should immediately be alert to and ready to proactively review and, if necessary, remedy.
  • The Minister of Social Development and Employment, Carmel Sepuloni has announced four entities are to receive funding, collectively totalling $5.5 million, for increased Māori Trades and Training initiatives. The recipients are Manaia SAFE Forestry School and the ICONIQ Group in Tairāwhiti-East Coast, North Drill Ltd in Northland-Tai Tokerau and Minginui Nursery in the Bay of Plenty.
  • Te Puni Kōkiri is investing circa $1 million in Papakāinga developments on Wharekauri (the Chatham Island) to create 5 new homes.  (Sounds great, but again, is this core business, or something Whānau Ora was originally scoped out to do?)
  • Sir Kim Workman has been appointed Chair of an Independent External Reference Group to support research into how the Police can ensure its services are fair and equitable.
  • Earlier this month the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) published the Social Housing Register data sheets for the quarter ending 31 December 2020. The data shows that 11,171 Māori (and their whānau) are in need of a house and qualify for assistance. This is 49% of all those registered, meaning Māori housing needs continue to be dispproportionately higher than others. Housing Register – Ministry of Social Development (msd.govt.nz)
  • Surf Lifesaving New Zealand published a report entitled National Beach & Coastal Safety Report 10-Year Overview 2010-2020 & 1-Year Overview 2019-20. The report showed that during the period 2010 to 2020, Pacific Peoples and Māori had the highest fatal drowning rates of 1.31, and 1.13 per 100,000 respectively, compared to the national rate of 0.85 per 100,000 .slsnz-beach-coastal-safety-report-2020_single-pages-for-digital-use.pdf (surflifesaving.org.nz) 

E7 Salient Māori News Items to 12 March 2021

 

  • Racism appears as a feature in the news this week. Setting aside major headlines around the Royal Family, there is also a minor article about a urologist at the national conference saying, in a panel presentation, that because ‘many Māori men are in prison’ there should not be a problem with reluctance to digital rectal examinations by Māori males to screen for prostate cancer, “as there is so much rectal probing, so ‘they’ could do their own examinations”. So, not just an example of overt racism and homophobia, but another example of direct prejudice within health service delivery.  The unnamed urologist has now apologised.
  • Associate Health Minister, Peeni Henare, has announced that $39 million is being put towards a targeted Māori COVID-19 vaccination strategy, including circa $25 million for Māori health providers to deliver services. The vaccine framework would provide for 40,000 courses of the vaccine to be given to Māori and Pacific older people – and the family members they live with (noting that many older people live with whānau rather than in retirement villages).   Minister Henare’s view is “this whānau-centred approach means that an entire whānau can be vaccinated all together and will help to keep our people safe.”  This service is said to be scheduled within the second stage of the vaccination rollout.
  • (As noted above) in December the Ministry of Health reissued its COVID resilience plan, called Kia Kaha, Kia Māia, Kia Ora Aotearoa – Psychosocial and Mental Wellbeing Plan (Refer Pānui 11/2020 refers). Despite the name the work does not have a significant Māori focus, rather it’s mostly just a list of actions within existing work programmes in central agencies which are centred on wellbeing.  So useful for a person, like a Cabinet Minister perhaps, who wants to get a handle of what programmes exist where.  In regards to Māori content, page 8 is the main reference, which states that upholding Te Tiriti is a core service principle.  Then there is reference to the Ministry’s new Te Tiriti framework (Pānui 29/2020 refers), and a reiteration of how Te Tiriti principles can be demonstrated during the COVID crisis via (i) better support for Māori organisations responding to COVID, (ii) enabling Māori to utilise mātauranga Māori approaches, (iii) adopting holistic welling approaches, and (iv) monitoring services to ensure good outcomes for Māori communities.   All up a light touch report which could mean a whole lot or next to nothing in terms of improving Māori mental health outcomes.
  • Te Aho o Te Kahu / the Cancer Control Agency has released its first report on ‘the State of Cancer in New Zealand’. In regards to Māori its findings are similar to the Ministry of Health.  Namely that “the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Māori are breast, lung, prostate and colorectal cancers.”   They also find that “the cancers that disproportionately affect Māori tend both to be highly preventable and to have poor prognoses”.   Cancers are said to reflect disproportionately high rates of tobacco exposure, chronic infections, factors associated with obesity, alcohol use and occupational exposures.   Linkages to socio-economic deprivation (poor nutrition, overcrowding, etc) are also made to provide a wider context than a simple focus on individual risk factors.

https://teaho.govt.nz/static/reports/state-of-cancer-in-new-zealand-2020.pdf

  • The Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee has published their 14th annual review report. They found babies of Māori, Pacific and Indian mothers aged less than 20 years were still more likely than babies of NZ European mothers to die in pregnancy, or within the first 28 days.  Overall, for the ten-year period to 2018, they found 31% of premature baby deaths were Māori. The recommend Health Boards work more closely with women in communities to reduce mortality rates.

report-pmmrc-14th.pdf (hqsc.govt.nz)

 

 

E21 Salient Māori News Items to 26 June 2020

  • On Thursday the Tertiary Education Commission announced the appointments to six workforce ‘interim Establishment Boards’ (iEB). The main role of each iEB is to establish Workforce Development Councils for six industry areas.[1] Once established these Councils will take over the role of Industry Training Organisations (ITOs) in overseeing workforce training and qualifications in the vocation and trades areas. We advise the following tangata Māori have been appointed to the iEBs.
    • John Chapman has been appointed to the Workforce Development – interim Establishment Board for Construction & Infrastructure.
    • Renata Hakiwai has been appointed to the Workforce Development – interim Establishment Board for Manufacturing, Engineering & Logistics.
    • Turi Ngatai, Wini Geddes and Hinerangi Edwards has been appointed to the Workforce Development – interim Establishment Board for Primary Industries.
    • Hinurewa te Hau and Karl Wixon have been appointed to the Workforce Development – interim Establishment Board for Creative, Cultural, Recreation and Technology.
    • Jean Te Huia has been appointed to the Workforce Development – interim Establishment Board for Health, Community & Social Services.

[1] These industry areas are: Construction & Infrastructure, Manufacturing, Engineering & Logistics, Primary Industries, Health, Community & Social Services, Service Industries and, Health, Community & Social Services.

  • The Government has announced it will provide $1.25 million from the Provincial Growth Fund for Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Rēhia Charitable Trust to upgrade Te Pā Kāinga o Rewa, or Rewa’s Village, in Kerikeri.
  • Last week a Waitangi Tribunal claim was lodged against the Crown proceeding with the Treaty of Waitangi settlement for Whakatōhea, (by iwi members opposed to the current process.)

(By way of background, the mandate of Whakatōhea Pre-settlement Claims Trust to settle historic claims of the iwi was tested via urgent Waitangi Tribunal hearing claims in 2017.  The Tribunal’s primary finding was that the Crown prioritised its objective of concluding Treaty settlements over a process that was fair to Whakatōhea. The Tribunal found the decision to recognise the Pre-settlement Trust mandate was therefore not fair, reasonable, or made in good faith, and breaches the Treaty principle of partnership.  To resolve this, in October 2018 Whakatōhea iwi members were asked to vote on the following: 1) continuing with the Whakatōhea Pre-Settlement Claim Trust as their treaty settlement entity? 2a) stop current Treaty negotiations in order that a mandate process be re-run from the start?  and 2b) stop current Treaty negotiations in order that the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry into the historical grievances of Whakatōhea?  The results that came out in November 2018 show a small majority (56%) of iwi members voted to continue negotiations with the Crown via the existing entity, but conversely a large majority (73%) voted to also stop negotiations until the Waitangi Tribunal can carry out an inquiry.

Against that backdrop the Crown has tentatively carried on negotiations, but the new claim is again focused on whether the mandate is strong enough – with claimants saying the 56% in favour is not enough, and is out of step with other settlement approaches.  Overall this settlement has a potential fiscal value of circa $100 million, but has experienced long negotiation delays.)

  • Last week the Ministry of Justice published Adults Convicted and Sentenced – Data Notes and Trends for 2019. For the year ending December 2019 44% (circa 25,000) of convicted adults were Māori. See Pānui 13/2020 for further information on this matter.

E17 Salient Māori News week ending 29 May 2020

  • Māui Hudson and Te Rau Kupenga have been appointed to Statistics New Zealand’s (Statistics NZ) new Governance Advisory Board. By way of further background, this advisory board has just been established, and Mr Kupenga and Mr Hudson are two of its six members.  As the Ministerial press release states, the role of the board is to assist with strategy and direction; and “sometimes to challenge Stats NZ’s CEO and Executive Leadership Team”.[1] The establishment of an external board like this for Statistics NZ is, in our assessment, highly desirable and is something we have suggested in the past.  This is due to the poor performance of Statistics NZ in servicing the needs of Māori in recent years, including but not limited to, inadequate Census work.  Having two proven Māori leaders in this area positioned to provide the Department with guidance and steerage is likely to be a step towards remedying this issue.  This work matters because gathering and correctly interpreting Māori statistics is a critical first action in the delivery of quality Māori policy advice across government.  For example, Statistics NZ’s lack of work on Māori businesses over the last four years now means the Government is somewhat blinded as it seeks to develop bespoke solutions for Māori businesses, such as Māori tourist operators, in its response to COVID-19 economic impacts.  That is, the necessary baseline data just was not gathered by the Department (but it could have been).  To date Statistics NZ has expressed only a diminutive understanding of the impacts on its failings on Māori wellbeing, so its likely Mr Kupenga and Mr Hudson, with the other advisors, will have some challenges ahead.

Research Snippets

  • Yesterday the Ministry for Women released the 2019 Gender Stocktake of State Sector Boards and Committees report. This provides an annual account of the number of women on state sector boards and committees.  (The Government has previously set a target of at least 50% female representation on these groupings by 2021.)   We advise the goal is nearly achieved, with 49% of these positions now being held by women (as at 31 December 2019).  We note wāhine Māori hold 10.8% of these roles. https://women.govt.nz/sites/public_files/Gender%20Maori%20and%20Ethnicity%20Stocktake%202019.pdf
  • This week the third reading of the Smoke-free Environments (Prohibiting Smoking in Motor Vehicles Carrying Children) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. When passed into law (after Royal Assent) this change will make it illegal for people to smoke in motor vehicles carrying children. For offenders, the Police will have the ability to issue a $50 infringement fee, or to issue warnings, and refer people to stop smoking support services.  We advise 31% of adult Māori smoke compared to 13% of the total adult population.  There is no data on the number of Māori adults who smoke in vehicles with children, but this law change has been supported by Hāpai Te Hauora (a Māori public health coalition).
  • On Thursday the second reading of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill was completed in Parliament. The purpose of this bill is to establish a Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. We advise that the bill proposes that membership of the Commission must include at least one commissioner who has knowledge, understanding and experience of te ao Māori and tikanga Māori. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_93099/mental-health-and-wellbeing-commission-bill
  • The Iwi Collective Partnership, (comprising of 17 iwi who work together to manage their fishing quota) have reportedly been bulk buying fish products at discounted prices from Sealord and Moana New Zealand (companies with wider Māori interests),[2] in order to distribute kaimoana to whānau within their respective areas.    This is part of their COVID-19 response to support families in need.  We believe the General Manager of the Collective Partnership, Maru Samuels, is correct in stating that this appears to be the first time the Treaty of Waitangi Fisheries Settlement has resulted in fish being directly supplied to Māori whānau.[3]
  • The Chief Executive of the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust, Kim Skelton, has resigned. Media reports are that the reasons given are said to be due a ‘toxic culture’ and inappropriate power balances.  (The information being referred to, however, is not in the public arena and therefore cannot be verified.)  We also note financial reports are also not available on line, and there have been past disputes on land sales and purchases (Pānui 20/2019 provides details).
  • Last week part-one of a five-part series focused on the Waikato-Tainui Treaty process was launched on Te Tai Treaty Settlement website. Part-two will be published 5 June.   https://raupatu.com/category/the-signing/

 

[1] Media release from James Shaw, Minister for Statistics.

[2] Sealord has 50% Māori ownership. Moana NZ (formally Aoteaora Fisheries) is owned by a wide range of iwi.

[3] Normally benefits of the settlement are distributed as financial dividends to iwi.

E8 20 March 2020: Appointments

  • Susy Frankel has been appointed a member of the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • Paul Hamer has been appointed a member of the Waitangi Tribunal.
  • The following have been appointed to the subsidiary boards of the New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology (NZIST). The newly established boards will come into effect on 1 April. 
    • Ripeka Evans, Ngaroma Tahana, and Leith Comer have been appointed to the Toi Ohomai board. Ms Evans has been named deputy chair.
    • Melanie Taite-Pitama has been appointed to the ARA board. Ms Taite-Pitama has been named deputy chair.
    • Hilton Collier and Chrissie Hape have been appointed to the Eastern Institute of Technology (EIT) board. Mr Collier has been named chair and Ms Hape deputy chair.
    • Steven Renata has been appointed to the boards of Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) and Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec).
    • Patrick Smith has been appointed to the Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT) board.
    • Ripeka Evans, Nicole Anderson, Erena Kara, and Bronwyn Yates have been appointed to the NorthTec board. Ms Evans has been named chair.
    • Megan Potiki and Karen Coutts have been appointed to the Otago Polytechnic board. Ms Potiki has been named deputy chair.
    • Aimee Kaio and Darren Rewi have been appointed to the Southern Institute of Technology (SIT) board.
    • Kara Edwards has been appointed to the Tai Poutini Polytechnic board.
    • Niwa Nuri and Raewyn Mahara have been appointed to the Waikato Institute of Technology (Wintec) board. Mr Nuri has been named chair.
    • Beverly Gibson and Colleen Tuuta have been appointed to the Western Institute of Technology (WITT) board. Ms Gibson has been named deputy chair.
    • Verne Atmore, Katarina Hina, and Lorraine Stephenson have been appointed to the UCOL board.
    • Kura Moeahu and Rainei Wineera-Parai have been appointed to the Wellington Institute of Technology (WelTec) and Whitireia Community College board.

E9 Covid-19 News Summary for the week ending 27 March 2020

Purpose

  • This is a news edition of Pānui, which provides a summary of recent media items of note relating to Covid-19 of high relevance to Māori communities.

Specific Māori-targeted funding to prevent Covid-19 spread

  • On Sunday Ministers Davis, Mahuta, Henare and Jackson announced a package of support for Māori communities and businesses to prevent Covid-19. Financial elements are[1]:
    • $10 million for community outreach from Vote: Māori Development;
    • $30 million via Whānau Ora Māori health services, including funding workforce needs, advice for whānau, in-home support for kaumatua (such as food parcels), a tele-health service, a Māori-led vaccination programme against influenza;
    • $1 million for needs assessments of Māori businesses (via a partnership between the Federation of Māori Businesses and New Zealand Māori Tourism);
    • $0.5 million re-prioritised within Te Arawhiti to work with iwi on their local responsiveness plans.
  • We note most of the funds being discussed above appear to be existing resources now tagged for covid-19 Māori community responses – i.e. further Whānau Ora funds were already in scope but Minister Henare has redirected it to a specific usage in preventing the spread of the virus. We also note this $40+ million is tiny in the light of a nation-wide $12 billion support package, and these Ministers rightly point out that Māori have equal access to those general funds – such as wage subsidies where needed.   But it’s not the time to quibble over such matters – the point is the Government is aware Māori require specific Covid-19 support services and is endeavouring to fund such services.

Iwi Assessment / Checkpoints Established

  • Some Māori community groups in the Far North and separately the iwi Te Whānau a Apanui on the East Coast (North Island) have established ‘checkpoints’ to assist in limiting unnecessary travel in their areas. The idea being to restrict the movement of tourists but not essential supplies.  Some media are describing these as roadblocks, but the function is as an assessment point.  Police staff have been stationed at the assessment points as well and there are no reports of any difficulties.  (Note also the assessment points in the Far North are fully supported by the region’s Mayor, John Carter).

Te Rōpū Whakakaupapa Urutā – National Māori Pandemic Group

  • A new grouping of Māori medical and health experts has been established to provide advice and information to Māori communities and iwi. There are thirty experts listed within the group.   In terms of Māori health; this grouping is (in our terms) the real deal – i.e. preeminent Māori leaders.
  • The website is https://www.uruta.maori.nz/. Go to that website for personal and group advice and support – for example what to do in the event of a Tangi, advice on caring for tamariki, information for kaumatua, etc.  We are particularly pleased to see this website established given our concerns last week that many hauora providers had not yet geared up to provide information to their communities.  This is a useful and positive development for Māori.

Parliamentary Matters

  • On Wednesday a state of Civil Emergency was declared, and the Prime Minister issued an Epidemic Notice under provisions of the Epidemic Preparedness Act 2006. The current session of Parliament was also closed. In effect these changes gives the Government Executive (Cabinet Ministers) extensive powers to overrule items of legislation, as required, in order to best manage and mitigate the pandemic, in accordance with the Health Act 1956.  (Note a special Parliamentary Committee has also been established to keep the Executive in check during this time.)  Using these powers New Zealand is now at Covid-19 Level 4 Risk.  This means the Prime Minister now requires that:

“Everyone should stay at home.  This is the best thing we can all do to stop the spread of Covid-19.  This will save lives.”

  • Details on who can leave home and in what circumstances, and all other information on Covid-19 is provided here: https://covid19.govt.nz  We encourage you all to follow the Government’s advice as it is entirely possible for New Zealand to suffocate this virus and extinguish it from Aotearoa.

Pānui – Service Disruption

  • With Parliament closed it is likely there will be no further Māori policy developments during the shutdown period – which is to be at least four weeks. e. no Treaty settlements will be progressed, Māori land law reform is halted, etc.  Because of that Pānui is not likely to be able to continue for some weeks.  We will continue to monitor the situation and will resume our service as soon as it is useful and feasible to do so.  We thank you in advance for your tolerance at this time.
  • Last, we wish you all well during this period of uncertainty. Stay safe and let’s unite against covid-19.  He waka eke noa.

Nā, Will Workman.

[1] More specifically, Kelvin Davis is the Minister for Māori/Crown Relations, Nanaia Mahuta is the Minister for Māori Development, Peeni Henare is the Minister is Whānau Ora and Willie Jackson is the Assoicate Minister for Employment (focused on Māori).

E41 22 November 2019 Salient Māori News

  • Rachel Taulelei ((Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Rarua, Ngāti Koata) has been appointed to the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC).
  • This week the Minister of Corrections, Kelvin Davis, and the Minister of Forestry, Shane Jones, announced that eleven prisoners from the ‘Release to Work’ programme have secured full time jobs or job offers within the forestry industry. The ‘release to work’ programme is a collaboration between Te Uru Rākau and the Department of Corrections, Northland Region Corrections Facility at Ngawha.
  • On Friday 29 November 2019 the Federation of Māori Authorities (FOMA) are hosting a Solutions Lab innovation in science co-design hui. The purpose of Solutions Lab is to provide the interface between the customer and the science sector (CRIs and Science system). The hui will be held at the Novotel Auckland Airport.
  • This week the Ministry for Women published a profile report on Māori businesswomen, entitled Ngā Wāhine Kaipakihi: He Tirohanga Māori Women In Business: Insights. The report identified that 3-percent of wāhine Māori are business owners.
    https://women.govt.nz/sites/public_files/4218_MFW_Maori%20Women%27s%20Report_final2%20for%20web_0.pdf
  • The first reading of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill was completed in Parliament and referred to the Health Committee. The purpose of this bill is to establish a Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. We advise that the membership of the Commission must include at least one commissioner who has knowledge, understanding and experience of te ao Māori and tikanga Māori.

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_93099/mental-health-and-wellbeing-commission-bill

E40 15 November 2019 Parliamentary Matters

  • On Tuesday the third reading of the Criminal Cases Review Commission Bill was completed in Parliament and received Royal Assent. This Act enables the establishment of an independent Criminal Cases Review Commission. Membership of the Commission must include at least one commissioner who must have knowledge or understanding of te ao Māori and tikanga Māori. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2018/0106/latest/LMS90599.html
  • On Thursday the first reading of the Sexual Violence Legislation Bill was completed in Parliament and referred to the Justice Committee. The purpose of this bill is to reduce the retraumatisation victims of sexual violence may experience when they attend court and give evidence by amending the Evidence Act 2006, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, and Criminal Procedure Act 2011. We advise between 1 July 2014 and 30 June 2018, circa 5,900 (25%) of all sexual violence claims made to the Police were reported by Māori; following  Police investigations 1,820 (32%)  of these claims led to charges which progressed to a court trial.https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_93010/sexual-violence-legislation-bill>
  • On Thursday the second reading of the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute Vesting Bill was completed in Parliament. This Bill provides for the transfer of assets and liabilities from the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute to Te Puia NZMACI Limited Partnership.
  • On Thursday the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill was introduced in Parliament. The purpose of this bill is to establish a Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.

Appointments and Awards E39 8 November 2019

 

  • The Health Research Council has published the recipients of the 2020 Māori Health Career Development Awards and the Māori Health Research Summer Studentship. We have listed these people below.
2020 Māori Health Career Development Awards
Dr Aria Graham

 

Māmā e Mamia – piloting a marae-based wellbeing model for pēpi and māmā Māori $328,000
Te Wai Barbarich-Unasa Whakamana te reo a ngā rangatahi ki roto i nga tautuhinga hauora $127,000
Phillipa Barton

 

Strategies to improve Māori recruitment and retention into nursing $127,000

 

Lisa Kremer Microdrop administration of phenylephrine and cyclopentolate in neonates $74,900
Georgia McCarty, Hauora Rangatahi Māori: Appropriateness and acceptability of health measures $135,000

 

Dr Tepora Emery He Toa Taumata Rau – The many resting places of courage $10,000
Carmen Timu-Parata, Breastfeeding support for whānau Māori: The Northland experience $10,000

 

2020 Māori Health Research Summer Studentship
Hazel Gilbert Māori women and methamphetamine addiction in pregnancy: A literature review $5,000
Julia Law Student health professionals’ understanding of tāngata whaikaha Māori concepts $5,000
Rebecca Lourie

 

Māori women and cervical screening: A Kaupapa Māori literature review $5,000
Denver Ruwhiu Conflicts of professionalism in medical curricula with Māori tīkanga and values $5,000
Rian Sanerive Use of online technology for effective wellness and exercise programme delivery $5,000
Ben Shine Positive youth development in Māori youth through an adventure education programme $5,000

 

E38 Salient Māori News Items to 1 November 2019

 

  • Hone Sadler has reportedly stood down as the chair of Tūhoronuku. (Tūhoronuku is the Treaty settlement trust of Ngāpuhi; which the present Minister, Andrew Little, has indicated does not have a clear mandate to proceed with settlement processes in its current form). The resignation is said to have occurred some weeks back, and appears to have followed the sudden resignation of Sonny Tau from the Chair of Te Rūnanga a Iwi o Ngāpuhi last month.  No public explanations have been given for this.  Mr James Clyde is the new chair of Tūhoronuku.
  • This week the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care commenced public hearings.  We advise the inquiry will consider “the nature and extent of abuse that occurred in state care and faith based institutes (between 1950 and 1999), what its immediate and long term impacts were, the factors (including systemic factors) which may have caused or contributed to it, and lessons to be learned from the past.”   A key focus remains on understanding any differential impacts of abuse in state care for Māori.  We note Mr Moana Jackson has been giving evidence on the impact of colonisation on fostering conditions for the abuse of Māori children in care.
  • The Waitangi Tribunal has granted an urgent hearing into child uplift policy at Oranga Tamariki . This follows significant Māori concern around the policy, sparked from an uplift attempt in Hastings in March.  The claim was lodged by Dr Rawiri Waretini-Karena, Dr Jane Alison Green, and Kerri Nuku.  Amongst other items they claim that the Crown has breached the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi by failing to protect Māori from the increasing and disproportionate rates of Māori children taken into state care and failing to take reasonable steps to address the institutional racism.  Meanwhile, the whānau of the baby involved that sparked the concerns has refused to participate in an internal review of the matter, indicating a lack of trust in Oranga Tamariki.  (We consider that without their participation a reasonable review process would be near impossible.)   Pānui 21/2019 and 27/2019 refer.
  • On Tuesday the Minister for Regional Economic Development, Shane Jones, announced that three Parihaka Pa Marae will be upgraded to high speed broadband via the Māori Digital Connectivity programme which is funded by the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF).
  • On Monday Te Pūtake o te Riri, He Rā Maumahara, a commemoration of the New Zealand wars and conflicts between Māori and the Crown, were held in Waitara.
  • Independent Commissioners have granted the Wellington Company resource consent for a housing and commercial development at Shelly Bay, Wellington. Several groups have been opposed to the development including a group  called Mau Whenua, who consider that their Trust board, the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust, was wrong to sell their land for the development, without explicit iwi consent. They continue to seek legal remedy to overturn the land sales.
  • On Wednesday the National Party held a launch for their Social Services Discussion Document, called the Social Services Discussion Document. The 56-page document outlines the National Party’s proposals on several social issues along with proposed approaches they will introduce if they win the 2020 general election.  Issues raised included a review of Whānau ora, reintroducing some of the benefit sanctions which were removed by the current Government, and “cracking down hard” on gangs.  They suggest welfare payments could be withheld from gang members if found to be receiving other illegal income.  As this is a proposal (and not National Party policy) we have not reviewed this material in full.

https://www.national.org.nz/social_services

E32A Māori News week ending 13 September 2019

Parliamentary Matters

  • On Tuesday the Ngāti Hinerangi Claims Settlement Bill was introduced in Parliament. This Bill provides for financial redress of $8.1 million, the return of 14 sites of cultural significance, a cultural revitalisation fund, and five commercial properties.

http://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-hinerangi/

  • On Thursday the first reading of Te Pire kia Unuhia te Hara kai Runga i a Rua Kēnana / Rua Kēnana Pardon Bill, was completed in Parliament. This Bill recognises and addresses the crimes against the Tūhoe prophet, Rua Kēnana, and his community of Maungapōhatu. In 1916 Rua was arrested and charged with sedition, and although he was found not guilty, he was still imprisoned for over eighteen months for resisting arrest.  A statutory pardon is being considered.

Appointments and Awards

  • Antoine Coffin (Ngaiterangi, Ngāti Ranginui, Raukawa) has been appointed to the Resource Management Review Panel. The panel will advise Government on the Resource Management Act and matters concerning freshwater, urban environment, waste and hazardous substances.
  • Topia Rameka (Ngāti Tūwharetoa) has been appointed as the inaugural Deputy Chief Executive – Māori for Ara Poutama Aotearoa – Department of Corrections.
  • Hayden Wano (Te Atiawa, Taranaki, Ngāti Awa) has been appointed to and named chair of the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • Dr Julie Wharewera-Mika (Ngāti Awa, Ngāi Tuhoe, Te Whānau-a-Apanui) has been appointed a member of the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • On Wednesday the Prime Ministers’ Education Excellence Awards were held in Wellington. Award winners included Te Kōhanga Reo ki Rotokawa, Excellence in Teaching and Learning and Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae, 2019 Focus Prize.

General News Items

  • This week Snap Reo, an online micro Te Reo learning programme, was launched. Snap Reo is funded by Te Māngai Pāho.
  • This week the Financial Markets Authority and Institute of Directors published ‘Ngā Mea Waiwai o te Tūranga Whakataka’ a Te Reo version of ‘The Essentials of Being a Director’. The resource is a guidebook for directors, and Traci Haupapa, Chair of the Federation of Māori Authorities (FoMA), notes it shows an increased commitment to diversity and inclusivity from the Authority. https://www.fma.govt.nz/assets/Guidance/IoD-FMA-Director-Essentials-in-Maori.pdf
  • On Tuesday the Government conjointly released ‘Every Life Matters, Suicide Prevention Strategy 2019 – 2029’ and an ‘Action Plan 2019 – 2024’. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and the Minister for Health, Dr David Clark, also announced that a designated Suicide Prevention Office will be established along with the establishment of a Māori Advisory group and Lived Experience group. This is a significant announcement as the Māori suicide rate is 28.2 per 100,000 tangata compared to the New Zealand overall rate of 13.9 per 100,000 people.
  • On Thursday Prime Minister Ardern and Minister Clark also released the draft terms of reference for the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • On Thursday Prime Minister Ardern also announced that the National School Curriculum is to be updated to make explicit the expectation of content taught within the New Zealand’s history curriculum. The changes will take effect for all schools and kura, years 1 – 10, in early 2022. Currently the National Curriculum enables schools and kura to decide how New Zealand history is covered. It is expected that the new curriculum will cover the following topics:
    • arrival of Māori to Aotearoa New Zealand;
    • first encounters and early colonial history;
    • Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and its history;
    • colonisation of, and immigration to, Aotearoa New Zealand, including the New Zealand Wars;
    • evolving national identity of Aotearoa New Zealand in the late 19th and early 20th centuries;
    • Aotearoa New Zealand’s role in the Pacific; and
    • Aotearoa New Zealand in the late 20th century and evolution of a national identity with cultural plurality.
  • This week Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust opened a show home for the trust’s Te Puna Wai Papakāinga Housing Project, in Wainuiomata. Te Puna Wai is a mixed tenure housing development that will be completed over two stages.  The trust has received from Te Puni Kōkiri a $2.6 million investment grant to support infrastructure costs for 23 housing sites, and the construction of 11 kaumātua rental homes. The trust plans to build 80 dwellings in total.
  • This week the Ministry for the Environment commenced a series of public consultation and feedback hui on freshwater issues, productive land, urban environment, waste and hazardous substances management. Consultation for the various issues closes late September to mid-October 2019. Dates and locations for upcoming Māori specific hui are listed in the table below.
Date Location Time Venue
16 September Blenheim 10:30am – 1:30pm Scenic Hotel
17 September Tauranga 9.00am – 12.00pm Hotel Armitage
18 September Greymouth 12.00pm – 3.00pm Ashley Hotel
18 September Whakatāne 9.00am – 12.00pm Manukatutahi Marae
19 September Rotorua 12:00pm – 3:00pm Te Ao Marama
23 September Gisborne 11:30am – 2:30pm Emerald Hotel
24 September Wairoa 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed
24 September Hamilton 11.00am – 2.00pm Hamilton Gardens Pavillion
25 September Napier 1.00pm – 4.00pm East Pier Hotel
25 September Auckland 12:30pm – 3:30pm Potters Park Events Centre
26 September Whangarei 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed
27 September Kaitaia 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed

E31 Salient Māori News week ending 6 September 2019

  • On Wednesday the Minister of Housing, Megan Wood, announced changes to the Government’s Kiwibuild programme, which is a policy initiative designed to increase housing affordability for low and middle income first home buyers. One of the main changes is a ‘Progressive Home Ownership Scheme’, via either rent-to-own or shared equity ownership models.  (Both approaches are thought to reduce the deposit burden required by whānau to enter the housing market.) [1]

The shared equity concept may allow for third-parties – potentially iwi entities – to co-own a home with a whānau, until the whānau can afford to purchase outright.  This concept has potential to increase Māori home ownership, and better position iwi/Māori entities in housing provision.  However, no substantive details on how it might work have been provided as yet.  (We also note no new funds are attached, just the redevelopment of existing housing funding.)   Overall, given housing was a major policy platform for this Government, it is difficult to see much gain as yet and the lack of practical details does not instil policy confidence.

[Important background context: Housing is one of two policy levers that has high tractability (social change potential), because of the flow-on effects to other socio-economic outcomes – i.e. better education and health outcomes are directly linked to housing quality and stability.  (School participation, for example, is easy and more consistent if children are not moving between multiple rental properties.)  Moreover, better economic outcomes are also linked to home ownership: in short, home ownership allows for the investment of income into an asset (the house), rather than the expenditure of income on rent.  This can lead to inter-generational wealth changes. For these reasons housing outcomes matter to Māori, but Statistics NZ research shows that the (age adjusted) Māori individual home ownership rate is 35% (and falling).  Ultimately most Māori adults and children now live in rental properties – opposite to the non-Māori population.  This is one of the key socio-economic differences between Māori and non-Māori.   (Pānui 19/2016 refers.)]

  • On Monday the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a 1-page infographic on labour market publication entitled ‘Labour Market Statistics Snapshot to June 2019’. This brings together already published Statistics NZ information and other data.  The Māori labour markets statistics presented are:
  • Ranginui 12 Trust has been granted a $2.8 million investment from Te Puni Kōkiri for the development of a nine home papakāinga in Tauranga. The total cost of the development is circa $4.8 million.
  • This week the Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, announced details for the ‘opt-in-donations’ scheme. Up to 1,700 decile 1-7 schools will be given the opportunity to receive additional funding of $150 per student, if they join the scheme, and forfeit the right to seek ‘activity fees’/donations from parents/whānau. The purpose of the funding is to reduce the financial burden of schooling on low income whānau and families.  We expect this will be positive outcome for many Māori whānau.
  • Today the Minister for Land Information, Eugenie Sage, announced that the Central North Island township of Bennydale will now be officially known by the dual name Maniaiti / Benneydale and the main railway line between Te Awamutu and Taumarunui, is now named ‘Te Ara-o-Tūrongo’ The name changes were initiated by Ngāti Maniapoto.
  • On Monday the Associate Minister of Education, Kelvin Davis, announced the launch of Te Mataaho-ā-Iwi: Iwi Education Profiles Dashboard. Te Mataaho-ā-Iwi is an online tool which provides data for Māori Learners including the learners’ iwi affiliation.  We are presently reviewing the usefulness of this tool and will advise further if appropriate.
  • On Wednesday the Associate Minister of Education, Kelvin Davis, launched Kauwhata Reo, an online hub for Te Reo Māori resources.  https://kauwhatareo.govt.nz/
  • This week a prominent Māori Northland doctor, Dr Lance O’Sullivan, called for the Government to make the immunisation of children compulsory and to impose sanctions on caregivers (such as reducing benefit payments) for those who chose not to have their children in the vaccination programme. The Associate Minister of Health, Julie Anne Genter, debunked that as a policy platform, noting that children should not be punished for the actions of their parents.  We are not aware of any evidence to support Dr O’Sullivan’s proposal that sanctions on those receiving state support may increase immunisation rates.

[We note the Ministry of Health’s Director of Public Health, Dr Caroline McElnay, advises immunisation is the best way to protect against getting measles.  Measles (MMR) vaccination is free to everyone under the age of 50 and is said to be 99 percent effective after two doses.]

[1] Other changes related to minium deposite thresholds.  The annoucement can be viewed here:  https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/kiwibuild-reset-reduces-deposit-needed-buy-first-home

[2] We provide a fuller analysis of unemployment and related data as Statistics NZ releases it.  Refer Pānui x/2019.