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E14 07 May 2021 – Māori Influenza Vaccination Programme Evaluation

  • The Ministry of Health published More Than Just A Jab: Evaluation Of The Māori Influenza Vaccination Programme As Part Of The COVID-19 Māori Health Response. This report presents the evaluation findings from the 2020 Māori Influenza Vaccination Programme (MIVP). The MIVP was an initiative set up as a direct response to COVID -19, the aim was to increase equity by increasing access to the influenza (flu) vaccine for vulnerable Māori groups who were eligible for free vaccinations i.e., kaumātua aged 65+ years, hapū māmā and Māori with pre-existing health conditions.

Key findings included within the report:

  • Influenza vaccination rates for Māori 65+ increased from 45.8% in 2019 to 59% in 2020.
  • Disparities in vaccinations rates were identified when comparing rates across different DHB regions.

https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/more-just-jab-evaluation-maori-influenza-vaccination-programme-part-covid-19-maori-health-response

E7 Salient Māori News Items to 12 March 2021

 

  • Racism appears as a feature in the news this week. Setting aside major headlines around the Royal Family, there is also a minor article about a urologist at the national conference saying, in a panel presentation, that because ‘many Māori men are in prison’ there should not be a problem with reluctance to digital rectal examinations by Māori males to screen for prostate cancer, “as there is so much rectal probing, so ‘they’ could do their own examinations”. So, not just an example of overt racism and homophobia, but another example of direct prejudice within health service delivery.  The unnamed urologist has now apologised.
  • Associate Health Minister, Peeni Henare, has announced that $39 million is being put towards a targeted Māori COVID-19 vaccination strategy, including circa $25 million for Māori health providers to deliver services. The vaccine framework would provide for 40,000 courses of the vaccine to be given to Māori and Pacific older people – and the family members they live with (noting that many older people live with whānau rather than in retirement villages).   Minister Henare’s view is “this whānau-centred approach means that an entire whānau can be vaccinated all together and will help to keep our people safe.”  This service is said to be scheduled within the second stage of the vaccination rollout.
  • (As noted above) in December the Ministry of Health reissued its COVID resilience plan, called Kia Kaha, Kia Māia, Kia Ora Aotearoa – Psychosocial and Mental Wellbeing Plan (Refer Pānui 11/2020 refers). Despite the name the work does not have a significant Māori focus, rather it’s mostly just a list of actions within existing work programmes in central agencies which are centred on wellbeing.  So useful for a person, like a Cabinet Minister perhaps, who wants to get a handle of what programmes exist where.  In regards to Māori content, page 8 is the main reference, which states that upholding Te Tiriti is a core service principle.  Then there is reference to the Ministry’s new Te Tiriti framework (Pānui 29/2020 refers), and a reiteration of how Te Tiriti principles can be demonstrated during the COVID crisis via (i) better support for Māori organisations responding to COVID, (ii) enabling Māori to utilise mātauranga Māori approaches, (iii) adopting holistic welling approaches, and (iv) monitoring services to ensure good outcomes for Māori communities.   All up a light touch report which could mean a whole lot or next to nothing in terms of improving Māori mental health outcomes.
  • Te Aho o Te Kahu / the Cancer Control Agency has released its first report on ‘the State of Cancer in New Zealand’. In regards to Māori its findings are similar to the Ministry of Health.  Namely that “the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Māori are breast, lung, prostate and colorectal cancers.”   They also find that “the cancers that disproportionately affect Māori tend both to be highly preventable and to have poor prognoses”.   Cancers are said to reflect disproportionately high rates of tobacco exposure, chronic infections, factors associated with obesity, alcohol use and occupational exposures.   Linkages to socio-economic deprivation (poor nutrition, overcrowding, etc) are also made to provide a wider context than a simple focus on individual risk factors.

https://teaho.govt.nz/static/reports/state-of-cancer-in-new-zealand-2020.pdf

  • The Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee has published their 14th annual review report. They found babies of Māori, Pacific and Indian mothers aged less than 20 years were still more likely than babies of NZ European mothers to die in pregnancy, or within the first 28 days.  Overall, for the ten-year period to 2018, they found 31% of premature baby deaths were Māori. The recommend Health Boards work more closely with women in communities to reduce mortality rates.

report-pmmrc-14th.pdf (hqsc.govt.nz)

 

 

E17 Salient Māori News week ending 29 May 2020

  • Māui Hudson and Te Rau Kupenga have been appointed to Statistics New Zealand’s (Statistics NZ) new Governance Advisory Board. By way of further background, this advisory board has just been established, and Mr Kupenga and Mr Hudson are two of its six members.  As the Ministerial press release states, the role of the board is to assist with strategy and direction; and “sometimes to challenge Stats NZ’s CEO and Executive Leadership Team”.[1] The establishment of an external board like this for Statistics NZ is, in our assessment, highly desirable and is something we have suggested in the past.  This is due to the poor performance of Statistics NZ in servicing the needs of Māori in recent years, including but not limited to, inadequate Census work.  Having two proven Māori leaders in this area positioned to provide the Department with guidance and steerage is likely to be a step towards remedying this issue.  This work matters because gathering and correctly interpreting Māori statistics is a critical first action in the delivery of quality Māori policy advice across government.  For example, Statistics NZ’s lack of work on Māori businesses over the last four years now means the Government is somewhat blinded as it seeks to develop bespoke solutions for Māori businesses, such as Māori tourist operators, in its response to COVID-19 economic impacts.  That is, the necessary baseline data just was not gathered by the Department (but it could have been).  To date Statistics NZ has expressed only a diminutive understanding of the impacts on its failings on Māori wellbeing, so its likely Mr Kupenga and Mr Hudson, with the other advisors, will have some challenges ahead.

Research Snippets

  • Yesterday the Ministry for Women released the 2019 Gender Stocktake of State Sector Boards and Committees report. This provides an annual account of the number of women on state sector boards and committees.  (The Government has previously set a target of at least 50% female representation on these groupings by 2021.)   We advise the goal is nearly achieved, with 49% of these positions now being held by women (as at 31 December 2019).  We note wāhine Māori hold 10.8% of these roles. https://women.govt.nz/sites/public_files/Gender%20Maori%20and%20Ethnicity%20Stocktake%202019.pdf
  • This week the third reading of the Smoke-free Environments (Prohibiting Smoking in Motor Vehicles Carrying Children) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament. When passed into law (after Royal Assent) this change will make it illegal for people to smoke in motor vehicles carrying children. For offenders, the Police will have the ability to issue a $50 infringement fee, or to issue warnings, and refer people to stop smoking support services.  We advise 31% of adult Māori smoke compared to 13% of the total adult population.  There is no data on the number of Māori adults who smoke in vehicles with children, but this law change has been supported by Hāpai Te Hauora (a Māori public health coalition).
  • On Thursday the second reading of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill was completed in Parliament. The purpose of this bill is to establish a Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. We advise that the bill proposes that membership of the Commission must include at least one commissioner who has knowledge, understanding and experience of te ao Māori and tikanga Māori. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_93099/mental-health-and-wellbeing-commission-bill
  • The Iwi Collective Partnership, (comprising of 17 iwi who work together to manage their fishing quota) have reportedly been bulk buying fish products at discounted prices from Sealord and Moana New Zealand (companies with wider Māori interests),[2] in order to distribute kaimoana to whānau within their respective areas.    This is part of their COVID-19 response to support families in need.  We believe the General Manager of the Collective Partnership, Maru Samuels, is correct in stating that this appears to be the first time the Treaty of Waitangi Fisheries Settlement has resulted in fish being directly supplied to Māori whānau.[3]
  • The Chief Executive of the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust, Kim Skelton, has resigned. Media reports are that the reasons given are said to be due a ‘toxic culture’ and inappropriate power balances.  (The information being referred to, however, is not in the public arena and therefore cannot be verified.)  We also note financial reports are also not available on line, and there have been past disputes on land sales and purchases (Pānui 20/2019 provides details).
  • Last week part-one of a five-part series focused on the Waikato-Tainui Treaty process was launched on Te Tai Treaty Settlement website. Part-two will be published 5 June.   https://raupatu.com/category/the-signing/

 

[1] Media release from James Shaw, Minister for Statistics.

[2] Sealord has 50% Māori ownership. Moana NZ (formally Aoteaora Fisheries) is owned by a wide range of iwi.

[3] Normally benefits of the settlement are distributed as financial dividends to iwi.

E9 Covid-19 News Summary for the week ending 27 March 2020

Purpose

  • This is a news edition of Pānui, which provides a summary of recent media items of note relating to Covid-19 of high relevance to Māori communities.

Specific Māori-targeted funding to prevent Covid-19 spread

  • On Sunday Ministers Davis, Mahuta, Henare and Jackson announced a package of support for Māori communities and businesses to prevent Covid-19. Financial elements are[1]:
    • $10 million for community outreach from Vote: Māori Development;
    • $30 million via Whānau Ora Māori health services, including funding workforce needs, advice for whānau, in-home support for kaumatua (such as food parcels), a tele-health service, a Māori-led vaccination programme against influenza;
    • $1 million for needs assessments of Māori businesses (via a partnership between the Federation of Māori Businesses and New Zealand Māori Tourism);
    • $0.5 million re-prioritised within Te Arawhiti to work with iwi on their local responsiveness plans.
  • We note most of the funds being discussed above appear to be existing resources now tagged for covid-19 Māori community responses – i.e. further Whānau Ora funds were already in scope but Minister Henare has redirected it to a specific usage in preventing the spread of the virus. We also note this $40+ million is tiny in the light of a nation-wide $12 billion support package, and these Ministers rightly point out that Māori have equal access to those general funds – such as wage subsidies where needed.   But it’s not the time to quibble over such matters – the point is the Government is aware Māori require specific Covid-19 support services and is endeavouring to fund such services.

Iwi Assessment / Checkpoints Established

  • Some Māori community groups in the Far North and separately the iwi Te Whānau a Apanui on the East Coast (North Island) have established ‘checkpoints’ to assist in limiting unnecessary travel in their areas. The idea being to restrict the movement of tourists but not essential supplies.  Some media are describing these as roadblocks, but the function is as an assessment point.  Police staff have been stationed at the assessment points as well and there are no reports of any difficulties.  (Note also the assessment points in the Far North are fully supported by the region’s Mayor, John Carter).

Te Rōpū Whakakaupapa Urutā – National Māori Pandemic Group

  • A new grouping of Māori medical and health experts has been established to provide advice and information to Māori communities and iwi. There are thirty experts listed within the group.   In terms of Māori health; this grouping is (in our terms) the real deal – i.e. preeminent Māori leaders.
  • The website is https://www.uruta.maori.nz/. Go to that website for personal and group advice and support – for example what to do in the event of a Tangi, advice on caring for tamariki, information for kaumatua, etc.  We are particularly pleased to see this website established given our concerns last week that many hauora providers had not yet geared up to provide information to their communities.  This is a useful and positive development for Māori.

Parliamentary Matters

  • On Wednesday a state of Civil Emergency was declared, and the Prime Minister issued an Epidemic Notice under provisions of the Epidemic Preparedness Act 2006. The current session of Parliament was also closed. In effect these changes gives the Government Executive (Cabinet Ministers) extensive powers to overrule items of legislation, as required, in order to best manage and mitigate the pandemic, in accordance with the Health Act 1956.  (Note a special Parliamentary Committee has also been established to keep the Executive in check during this time.)  Using these powers New Zealand is now at Covid-19 Level 4 Risk.  This means the Prime Minister now requires that:

“Everyone should stay at home.  This is the best thing we can all do to stop the spread of Covid-19.  This will save lives.”

  • Details on who can leave home and in what circumstances, and all other information on Covid-19 is provided here: https://covid19.govt.nz  We encourage you all to follow the Government’s advice as it is entirely possible for New Zealand to suffocate this virus and extinguish it from Aotearoa.

Pānui – Service Disruption

  • With Parliament closed it is likely there will be no further Māori policy developments during the shutdown period – which is to be at least four weeks. e. no Treaty settlements will be progressed, Māori land law reform is halted, etc.  Because of that Pānui is not likely to be able to continue for some weeks.  We will continue to monitor the situation and will resume our service as soon as it is useful and feasible to do so.  We thank you in advance for your tolerance at this time.
  • Last, we wish you all well during this period of uncertainty. Stay safe and let’s unite against covid-19.  He waka eke noa.

Nā, Will Workman.

[1] More specifically, Kelvin Davis is the Minister for Māori/Crown Relations, Nanaia Mahuta is the Minister for Māori Development, Peeni Henare is the Minister is Whānau Ora and Willie Jackson is the Assoicate Minister for Employment (focused on Māori).

E41 22 November 2019 Salient Māori News

  • Rachel Taulelei ((Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Rarua, Ngāti Koata) has been appointed to the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC).
  • This week the Minister of Corrections, Kelvin Davis, and the Minister of Forestry, Shane Jones, announced that eleven prisoners from the ‘Release to Work’ programme have secured full time jobs or job offers within the forestry industry. The ‘release to work’ programme is a collaboration between Te Uru Rākau and the Department of Corrections, Northland Region Corrections Facility at Ngawha.
  • On Friday 29 November 2019 the Federation of Māori Authorities (FOMA) are hosting a Solutions Lab innovation in science co-design hui. The purpose of Solutions Lab is to provide the interface between the customer and the science sector (CRIs and Science system). The hui will be held at the Novotel Auckland Airport.
  • This week the Ministry for Women published a profile report on Māori businesswomen, entitled Ngā Wāhine Kaipakihi: He Tirohanga Māori Women In Business: Insights. The report identified that 3-percent of wāhine Māori are business owners.
    https://women.govt.nz/sites/public_files/4218_MFW_Maori%20Women%27s%20Report_final2%20for%20web_0.pdf
  • The first reading of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill was completed in Parliament and referred to the Health Committee. The purpose of this bill is to establish a Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. We advise that the membership of the Commission must include at least one commissioner who has knowledge, understanding and experience of te ao Māori and tikanga Māori.

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_93099/mental-health-and-wellbeing-commission-bill

Appointments and Awards E39 8 November 2019

 

  • The Health Research Council has published the recipients of the 2020 Māori Health Career Development Awards and the Māori Health Research Summer Studentship. We have listed these people below.
2020 Māori Health Career Development Awards
Dr Aria Graham

 

Māmā e Mamia – piloting a marae-based wellbeing model for pēpi and māmā Māori $328,000
Te Wai Barbarich-Unasa Whakamana te reo a ngā rangatahi ki roto i nga tautuhinga hauora $127,000
Phillipa Barton

 

Strategies to improve Māori recruitment and retention into nursing $127,000

 

Lisa Kremer Microdrop administration of phenylephrine and cyclopentolate in neonates $74,900
Georgia McCarty, Hauora Rangatahi Māori: Appropriateness and acceptability of health measures $135,000

 

Dr Tepora Emery He Toa Taumata Rau – The many resting places of courage $10,000
Carmen Timu-Parata, Breastfeeding support for whānau Māori: The Northland experience $10,000

 

2020 Māori Health Research Summer Studentship
Hazel Gilbert Māori women and methamphetamine addiction in pregnancy: A literature review $5,000
Julia Law Student health professionals’ understanding of tāngata whaikaha Māori concepts $5,000
Rebecca Lourie

 

Māori women and cervical screening: A Kaupapa Māori literature review $5,000
Denver Ruwhiu Conflicts of professionalism in medical curricula with Māori tīkanga and values $5,000
Rian Sanerive Use of online technology for effective wellness and exercise programme delivery $5,000
Ben Shine Positive youth development in Māori youth through an adventure education programme $5,000

 

E32A Māori News week ending 13 September 2019

Parliamentary Matters

  • On Tuesday the Ngāti Hinerangi Claims Settlement Bill was introduced in Parliament. This Bill provides for financial redress of $8.1 million, the return of 14 sites of cultural significance, a cultural revitalisation fund, and five commercial properties.

http://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-hinerangi/

  • On Thursday the first reading of Te Pire kia Unuhia te Hara kai Runga i a Rua Kēnana / Rua Kēnana Pardon Bill, was completed in Parliament. This Bill recognises and addresses the crimes against the Tūhoe prophet, Rua Kēnana, and his community of Maungapōhatu. In 1916 Rua was arrested and charged with sedition, and although he was found not guilty, he was still imprisoned for over eighteen months for resisting arrest.  A statutory pardon is being considered.

Appointments and Awards

  • Antoine Coffin (Ngaiterangi, Ngāti Ranginui, Raukawa) has been appointed to the Resource Management Review Panel. The panel will advise Government on the Resource Management Act and matters concerning freshwater, urban environment, waste and hazardous substances.
  • Topia Rameka (Ngāti Tūwharetoa) has been appointed as the inaugural Deputy Chief Executive – Māori for Ara Poutama Aotearoa – Department of Corrections.
  • Hayden Wano (Te Atiawa, Taranaki, Ngāti Awa) has been appointed to and named chair of the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • Dr Julie Wharewera-Mika (Ngāti Awa, Ngāi Tuhoe, Te Whānau-a-Apanui) has been appointed a member of the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • On Wednesday the Prime Ministers’ Education Excellence Awards were held in Wellington. Award winners included Te Kōhanga Reo ki Rotokawa, Excellence in Teaching and Learning and Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae, 2019 Focus Prize.

General News Items

  • This week Snap Reo, an online micro Te Reo learning programme, was launched. Snap Reo is funded by Te Māngai Pāho.
  • This week the Financial Markets Authority and Institute of Directors published ‘Ngā Mea Waiwai o te Tūranga Whakataka’ a Te Reo version of ‘The Essentials of Being a Director’. The resource is a guidebook for directors, and Traci Haupapa, Chair of the Federation of Māori Authorities (FoMA), notes it shows an increased commitment to diversity and inclusivity from the Authority. https://www.fma.govt.nz/assets/Guidance/IoD-FMA-Director-Essentials-in-Maori.pdf
  • On Tuesday the Government conjointly released ‘Every Life Matters, Suicide Prevention Strategy 2019 – 2029’ and an ‘Action Plan 2019 – 2024’. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and the Minister for Health, Dr David Clark, also announced that a designated Suicide Prevention Office will be established along with the establishment of a Māori Advisory group and Lived Experience group. This is a significant announcement as the Māori suicide rate is 28.2 per 100,000 tangata compared to the New Zealand overall rate of 13.9 per 100,000 people.
  • On Thursday Prime Minister Ardern and Minister Clark also released the draft terms of reference for the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • On Thursday Prime Minister Ardern also announced that the National School Curriculum is to be updated to make explicit the expectation of content taught within the New Zealand’s history curriculum. The changes will take effect for all schools and kura, years 1 – 10, in early 2022. Currently the National Curriculum enables schools and kura to decide how New Zealand history is covered. It is expected that the new curriculum will cover the following topics:
    • arrival of Māori to Aotearoa New Zealand;
    • first encounters and early colonial history;
    • Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and its history;
    • colonisation of, and immigration to, Aotearoa New Zealand, including the New Zealand Wars;
    • evolving national identity of Aotearoa New Zealand in the late 19th and early 20th centuries;
    • Aotearoa New Zealand’s role in the Pacific; and
    • Aotearoa New Zealand in the late 20th century and evolution of a national identity with cultural plurality.
  • This week Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust opened a show home for the trust’s Te Puna Wai Papakāinga Housing Project, in Wainuiomata. Te Puna Wai is a mixed tenure housing development that will be completed over two stages.  The trust has received from Te Puni Kōkiri a $2.6 million investment grant to support infrastructure costs for 23 housing sites, and the construction of 11 kaumātua rental homes. The trust plans to build 80 dwellings in total.
  • This week the Ministry for the Environment commenced a series of public consultation and feedback hui on freshwater issues, productive land, urban environment, waste and hazardous substances management. Consultation for the various issues closes late September to mid-October 2019. Dates and locations for upcoming Māori specific hui are listed in the table below.
Date Location Time Venue
16 September Blenheim 10:30am – 1:30pm Scenic Hotel
17 September Tauranga 9.00am – 12.00pm Hotel Armitage
18 September Greymouth 12.00pm – 3.00pm Ashley Hotel
18 September Whakatāne 9.00am – 12.00pm Manukatutahi Marae
19 September Rotorua 12:00pm – 3:00pm Te Ao Marama
23 September Gisborne 11:30am – 2:30pm Emerald Hotel
24 September Wairoa 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed
24 September Hamilton 11.00am – 2.00pm Hamilton Gardens Pavillion
25 September Napier 1.00pm – 4.00pm East Pier Hotel
25 September Auckland 12:30pm – 3:30pm Potters Park Events Centre
26 September Whangarei 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed
27 September Kaitaia 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed

E36 19 October 2018: Social Research and Policy Snippets

Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry

The Minister of Health, David Clark, has advised that an extension has been given for the report on the Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry back to Cabinet. It will now be delivered by 30 November.  This is to recognise the 5,500 submissions were received on this topic.  (Note the submissions are considered sensitive and are therefore not available for public purview.)

By way of background, the inquiry is broad in scope, and the terms of reference enable recommendations to be made across all structures within the health and the broader public sector.  The inquiry is chaired by Professor Ron Paterson, and there are two Māori on the panel of six (Sir Mason Durie and Dean Rangihuna). This is a policy area of particular importance to Māori, as Māori are significantly over-represented in mental health service areas, and in suicide statistics. The terms of reference acknowledge this health inequality, and require the panel to consider this matter, and to also work in ways appropriate to Māori, and in accordance with the Treaty of Waitangi.


Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historic Abuse in State Care

The Minister for Internal Affairs, Tracey Martin, has put out a media statement indicating circa 500 people have expressed interest in giving evidence into the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historic Abuse in State Care. Fifteen staff are also apparently working with the Commissioner Sir Anand Satyanand in preparatory stages of the inquiry.

Yet what is missing from the media statement is any word on the appointment of other Royal Commission members – which is odd given this is such a significant inquiry, and it was announced over six months ago. That is, to date Māori input on this matter remains at zero – despite the draft terms of reference stating that, “a key focus of the Inquiry is to understand any differential impacts of abuse in state care for Māori”.  Māori tamariki comprise over half of young people in State care, so the Government needs to appoint people to this Inquiry with a strong understanding of Māori care and abuse specific matters; and the sooner the better in our assessment.


 Criminal Justice Sector Reforms – Further Consultation

The Minister of Justice, Andrew Little, has announced that his advisory group for justice sector reforms will now hold a series of regional public consultation meetings. By way of background, this initiative is called, Hāpai i te Ora Tangata / Safe and Effective Justice, and commenced with a large national conference/hui in August. A key theme of the work programme is addressing and reducing Māori rates of criminal offending and reoffending; and as previously advised the working group has four Māori members: Quentin Hix, Tracey McIntosh, Carwyn Jones, and Julia Amua Whaipooti.  The following two articles highlight new data relevant to this policy initiative.
Justice Sector Reforms Public Consultation Meetings.

Date Time Location Venue
29 October 12:30pm – 3:30 pm Timaru Timaru Council Chambers
30 October 9:00am – 12:00pm Christchurch Aranui Library
5 November 1:00pm – 4:30pm Tauranga TBA
6 November 1:00pm – 4:00pm Whangārei Whangārei Central Library
13 November 1:00pm – 4:00pm Tokoroa Tokoroa Public Library
14 November 9:00am – 1:00pm Te Kuiti Te Kuiti Community Room
15 November TBA New Plymouth TBA
17 November 9:00am – 11:00am Palmerston North Palmerston North City Library

Homicide Victims Data Released

Last month the New Zealand Police published a report entitled Police Statistics on Homicide Victims in New Zealand 2007 – 2016: Summary of Statistics about Victims of Murder, Manslaughter, and Infanticide. The report showed between 2007 and 2016, 223 Māori were victims of homicide, which was 33% of all victims (686 in total).  Māori males comprised 22% (154) of all victims and 69% of the total number of Māori victims.  These statistics are a sad over-representation, given Māori comprise only 15% of the total population.

http://www.police.govt.nz/about-us/publication/homicide-victims-report-2017-and-historic-nz-murder-rate-report-1926-2017


Injury Data Released

Last week Statistics New Zealand released injury data. There are two stand-out areas for Māori: injuries from assaults at 37 per 100,000 people, and injuries from motor vehicle accidents at 67 per 100,000.  Both rates   are significantly higher than for non-Māori.  The overall injury data shows a similar rate of non-fatal but serious injuries (and a lower rate of Māori having falls).[1]

https://www.stats.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Serious-injury-outcome-indicators/Serious-injury-outcome-indicators-2000-17/Download-data/serious-injury-outcome-indicators-2000-17.xlsx

[1] Falls are associated more frequently with elderly citizens and there are fewer Māori elderly than others, i.e. a life expectancy disparity of 7 years.  This fact sheet does not probe such matters.

Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd – E29 31 August 2018

Hikurangi Cannabis Ltd has been issued a license by the Ministry of Health to grow specific strains of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes. This is a Ruatoria-based company which has community and corporate shareholdings and investment; meaning if this business is successful then a proportion of profits will ultimately be returned to the Hikurangi Huataukina Trust (which supports communities between Waipiro Bay and Rangitukia.[1])   Note the Government presently has legislation before Parliament which proposes amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act, to allow for some uses of medicinal cannabis.  Hikurangi Cannabis will need this amendment to pass into law before they can commence sales (Pānui 2/2018 refers).

[1] Plus other areas on the East Coast.

E23 6 July 2018 – Quarterly Review for the Period 1 April to 30 June 2018

This quarterly review provides a summary of significant Māori focused social, economic and Treaty policy developments for the period 1 April to 30 June 2018.

Within the quarter we reviewed 12 data set publications, 10 research reports, 8 Government policy / legislative issues. Information summaries are provided within the following appendices.

This quarter there have been three Māori focused policy items of salient note:

  • Budget 2018/19 reduced specific Māori Development funds – the Finance Minister said this is because Te Puni Kōkiri had not used past money, and that Māori are gaining outcomes elsewhere; whereas the Minister for Māori Development denied (wrongly) that was the Budget reality;
  • Whānau Ora is to be externally reviewed – although a Te Puni Kōkiri evaluation released this month of the initiative finds no issues arising; and
  • the Government has rejected building a mega prison at Waikeria instead a 500 bed rebuild will be undertaken, linked to a 100 bed secure mental health facility, a policy decision which suggests greater awareness of the significant link between criminal offending and poor mental health.

These items are further discussed below. Further information is available within the appendices and Pānui editions as referenced.

Social Policy Matters

Overview of Socio-Economic Matters

Data released this quarter continues to show ongoing socio-economic disparities presenting between Māori and other New Zealanders, with no significant positive or negative change. Two key statistics for the quarter are that:

  • 97,400 Māori (aged 18-64 years) and their household whānau are welfare reliant – this is circa 26% of working age Māori adults; and
  • 6% of Māori in the labour force were unemployed, (33,100 people). By comparison, the New Zealand overall unemployment rate was about half of that, at 4.4%[1]

Education Sector Summary

This quarter the New Zealand Qualifications Authority released the 2017 NCEA results; which showed around 74% of Year 12 Māori learners achieved NCEA level 2. This was about the same as the previous year, and ten percentile points below non-Māori.  Research and ideas for addressing schooling disparities continued to be tabled, with a discussion on racial bias making it into the official policy papers as one rationale for reforming the school sector.

More positively, new research on literacy shows significant gains across the Māori population over the last decade – with 81% of Māori now having fair or better English language literacy (which is needed for workforce gains). Te Reo literacy is also strong, with Māori school learners found to be enjoying this subject and also out-performing others across the board.  This success perhaps links back to the racial bias / differing cultural capital discussion – i.e. if most teachers were Māori and taught subjects such as maths and science from a Māori perspective (as Te Reo is) would the results across the nation be different?  Other education items of note:

  • The Treasury contributed to the disparity discussion with research that confirmed the obvious conclusion that students who change schools a lot are at educational risk – and they noted Māori more than others are in this grouping;
  • the Ministry of Education’s tertiary research analyst released a report that confirms that greater proportions of Māori study at the lower levels in the tertiary education sector (linked to lower school qualifications). The result of the tertiary education outcome is that a qualification disadvantage presents within the workforce thereby suppressing Māori wages and employment opportunities;
  • research about the Youth Guarantee initiative was released, which shows the programme is successful in keeping students engaged in education (good), but that links to tertiary level 4 study and industry training / apprenticeships and the like, are not clearly proven (not good). e. whilst these students (many are Māori) undertake trade preparation type courses, the initiative is not actually giving them a direct pathway into employment within the trade sectors.

Health Sector Summary

In the health sector, as always, an assortment of research data was published. This quarter disparities were shown in areas such as tamariki deaths, abortion rates, children with “major social, emotional and/or behavioural problems”, elderly nutrition, colorectal cancer, and non-seat belt wearing car accident deaths.  Probably all well intended studies and data sets, but collectively all reflecting the differences in how Māori and non-Māori live so differently within the same geopolitical terra firma.

The key item within the health sector, however, was the announcement of a major review of how services work. We note, in regard to the review, Health Minister David Clark states, “we need to face up to the fact that our health system does not deliver equally well for all. We know our Māori and Pacific peoples have worse health outcomes and shorter lives. That is something we simply cannot accept.”   Given the above data, which is relentless every quarter in showing some form of health disparity, in our view the Minister could not be more veridical.

Housing Sector Summary

In the housing sector Minister Phil Twyford (re)announced $63.4 million funding for ‘Housing First Fund’, which is focusing on increasing houses available for vulnerable families. The need for this was also (re)confirmed with the Ministry of Social Development also releasing its public housing quarterly report, to 31 March 2018.   The report finds that 36% (23,600-odd) public housing tenants are Māori.  That is disproportionately high, given Māori are 15% of the total population.   In addition, there is a register of who needs a house and qualify for assistance, but do not have one – of these people we advise 44% are Māori (circa 3,500 tangata.)

Overall this type of data points towards housing being an issue of prominence for Māori – i.e. over 10% of all Māori may be living in or needing state/public housing – compared with about 1% of non-Māori. The next policy action required from this Ministry is to better link this data with sole-parent and gender information, as indicative links with household income data point towards sole-mothers, mainly Māori, being the grouping disproportionately in need.

Justice Sector Summary

There were two key items within the justice sector this quarter of relevance to Māori. First, as above, the Government announced it would not build a mega prison at Waikeria, but it would rebuild a smaller prison, and a 100-bed secure mental health facility.  While this is well short of the radical tikanga Māori prison proposal Minister Kelvin Davis broached back when he was in opposition, it is a step towards better recognising the strong link between criminal offending and poor mental health.  The Government’s Waikeria decision ties in well with the second item of note: robust research from the Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Scientific Advisor showing that early intervention works best in preventing offending.  This is partially because young offenders often have mental health issues: for example, alcohol or drug dependencies, which can be addressed early thereby mitigating offending and other social ills.  Note also this quarter the Ministry of Health released a research report indicating perhaps 12% of Māori children, around 23,000, may have what they classified as ‘significant social, emotional and/or behavioural problems’.

In our assessment while there has been a known link between criminal offending and health previously, there does appear to be a conceptual shift away from the notion that some people are ‘criminals’ (full stop), towards an understanding that many people who commit offences do so because of a period of poor mental health, which means they do not appropriately regulate their own behaviours. This discussion is particularly important for Māori, as about half of the people incarcerated in New Zealand prisons are Māori, and Māori also have much higher rates of reported mental health issues.  Accordingly, the scientific recommendation to focus on mitigation of poor health and behaviour issues early in life does present as a sensible basis for new policies, including the proposal that Māori approaches be used to support Māori tamariki.  This in our view is ‘not rocket science’, but it is now published scientific research none the less.

Social Sector Summary

In the social wellbeing sector, as noted above, 97,000 Māori households are welfare reliant. Statistics New Zealand also released data which showed poor households such as these face greater inflation pressures.  A link to the increased price of tobacco was made, implying tobacco consumption is detrimental to household finances, not just population health.   In addition, funding to reduce family violence was also (re)announced; and The Treasury released a report indicating they are still beavering away somewhere on what wellbeing might actually be; (possibly it will mean having more money to pay the bills, having a home, being free of violence and the like, but they have not landed it just yet).  A separate Māori wellbeing framework is also being considered by The Treasury.  (We note Whānau Ora contains a solid Māori wellbeing framework, but The Treasury does not acknowledge its existence.)

The annual evaluation of Whānau Ora was released by Te Puni Kōkiri (TPK). We found it to be a weak evaluation report which identified no issues arising and continued to under-explain this initiative.  Ironically, that report was released (without a Ministerial forward) just weeks after the Government announced it would review Whānau Ora, and with terms of reference that clearly signals that transparency and accountability are items for improvement.  We interpret that as a vote of no-confidence in TPK in this work area.   However, perhaps more directly relevant to many Māori whānau (circa one-third) is that this quarter the Government confirmed that it would review the entire welfare system.  Quite what this entails is not yet clear.

Economic Matters

The Budget

The major economic item for the quarter is the Government’s Budget, released in May. Overall the Government is forecasting an operating surplus of $3.1 billion, even after taking into account its new spending.  But as advised above, for Vote: Māori Development funding is to drop, this year, and every year forecast afterwards.[2]  As previously noted Finance Minister Grant Robertson says the drop in Vote: Māori Development reflects programmes that Te Puni Kōkiri did not deliver on being removed from the Budget – so again an implicit vote of no confidence for TPK, which is presenting as somewhat under siege.  In his view, however, Māori whānau are estimated to receive $1.5 billion more in services through the Government’s wider programmes, such as the Families Package: however we can see no means for the Government to evidence that estimate.

In our assessment, funds removed from Te Puni Kōkiri will reduce its policy function from this year – effectively retarding its ability to give advice on the impact of mainstream programmes on Māori. This is despite the fact that there are service gaps – i.e. disparities being experienced by Māori in all social areas, including health, education and housing – some of which are shown in the discussion above.

We note there has been no consultation with Māori, and no explanation as to why Māori Development funds went unspent last year. The denials of funding cuts by Ministers Mahuta and Jackson do not help the situation.[3]  In short, the Labour Party holds all seven Māori electoral seats in Parliament and has the largest number of Māori members of Cabinet than at any time previously.  At both Ratana and Waitangi Day earlier this year the Government indicated it would increase Māori services, so it follows some Māori voters may feel betrayed by this Budget, and particularly by the Minister for Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, who so far has tabled no clear initiatives nor policy plan for Māori Development.  The pressure will be on her to deliver something in next year’s Budget; and she will also need to either express a higher level of confidence in Te Puni Kōkiri or to propose something better.

Pānui also reviewed other Vote areas in regard to Māori specific funding. Information is provided in the appendices: there were no radical changes of note.

 

Other Economic Matters

Six other economic matters of note are listed below.

  • The consultancy firm TDB Advisory released a report summarising the financial performance of eight iwi, from 2011 to 2017.  The iwi groups are Ngāi Tahu, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrakei, Rangitāne o Wairau, Raukawa, Ngāi Tūhoe and Waikato-Tainui. All have made money, a few have made lots of money (e.g. Waikato-Tainui had a strong financial year), with very good returns on their investments.
  • The Productivity Commission released a draft report on climate change, proposing new legislation and a new Commission to assist future Governments achieve a low emission economy. For Māori they suggest a Treaty of Waitangi clause would be useful for incoming legislation, combined with some type of Māori advisory committee.
  • The Ministry for the Environment also published work on climate change, with a report from its technical working group being released. This group has a range of recommendations to reduce emissions, and for Māori specifically they suggest the Government “commission mātauranga Māori-led measures that reflect cultural impacts of climate change and are developed and managed by iwi/hapū”.
  • The Land and Water Forum released a new report focusing on how to prevent degradation of water quality, particularly sediment and nitrogen pollutants. In relation to Māori, the Forum repeats its views that Māori interests in water (i.e. any proprietary and usage rights) are in their ‘too-hard’ basket, and thus the Crown needs to address such matters directly.   They point out the current situation is creating uncertainty which undermines long term investment decisions needed to improve water quality.  Hence their recommendation that “Central government must, as a priority, work with iwi to reach agreement on how to resolve rights and interests in fresh water.”.
  • The Government announced that the offshore block offers for oil and gas exploration permits will end (i.e. no new offers to be made). The block offer was an annual tender process established by the former National led Government that allowed for oil and gas companies to bid for permits. Many iwi groups had petitioned about oil exploration in their respective off-shore areas.
  • The Government has announced it is reviewing consumer credit regulations, of interest as Māori are identified as one grouping at risk – which is no surprise given the high percentage of welfare reliance noted above.

Treaty Matters

Waitangi Tribunal Matters
This quarter the Waitangi Tribunal released its report on its Whakatōhea Mandate Inquiry. The Tribunal found the Crown breached the Treaty of Waitangi by prioritising its objective of seeking to conclude a Treaty settlement over processes that were fair to the hapū groupings within Whakatōhea.  Thus the decision to recognise the pre-settlement Trust mandate was found not to be fair, reasonable or made in good faith.  This is consistent with the Tribunal’s view in other areas: that mandate issues, including hapū consent must be satisfactorily resolved before the Crown pushes ahead with negotiations.

Treaty Settlements
This quarter Parliament made progress with five Treaty settlements; with two of these reaching conclusion and thus becoming law. The groupings were:

  • Ngāti Rangi (legislation introduced to Parliament);
  • Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Tamaoho (both had respective second readings)[4];
  • Heretaunga Tamatea and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki both had their respective third readings – thereby concluding these two settlements of circa $100 million and $13 million respectively.

Government and Parliamentary Matters
In addition to the above sector issues, we note three further Parliamentary matters of note this quarter.

  • Adding to the Treaty settlement concerns of Whakatōhea, the Minister for Māori Development has advised she has asked for an independent review of the governance and management of the Whakatōhea Trust Board;
  • A Bill to entrench Māori electoral seats was introduced to Parliament.
  • Referenda were held by five local bodies in regard to the establishment of Māori wards – in all cases the notion of Māori wards was rejected by voters. This situation of predominantly non-Māori voters determining how Māori voters may be represented within local Government presents to us as manifestly unjust.  The matter is discussed within Pānui 15/2018.

[1] This data is from Statistics New Zealand and the Ministry of Social Development data sets.

[2] It will drop by $2 million in the year ahead (even after setting aside all extraordinary increases this year), and by $17 million over the next four years.

[3] Their answers to Parliamentary Questions have been provided in Pānui so that subscribers can determine for themselves the integrity of the responses given to challenging questions.

[4] The Ngāti Porou Bill relates to marine and foreshore matters.

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 16 March Edition 8/ 2018

  • On Wednesday the sale of plain packaging tobacco products came into force. Plain packaging is a measure introduced under the Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Standardised Packaging) Amendment Act. The potential benefit of plain packaging should be disproportionally positive for Māori.  This is because the smoking rate amongst Māori is double that of the overall population, and tobacco consumption is believed to account for a significant portion of the life expectancy differential between Māori and non-Māori.[1]More than 600 Māori are said to die ‘prematurely’ each year from smoking related illnesses.  Former Associate Minister for Health, Tariana Turia, should rightly be acknowledged as a driving force behind this legislative change now coming into effect.
  • [1] Ministry of Health research
  • A petition by Renae Maihi asking the Prime Minister to strip Sir Robert Jones of his Knighthood on the basis of alleged inflammatory comments made about Māori has now reached 66,000 people in support. Ms Maihi and her supporters plan to present the petition to Labour MP Kiritapu Allan at Parliament on Tuesday 27th March 2018.  (Note if a petition is formally received at Parliament by a Member of Parliament, then it can be announced to the House, and sent to a Select Committee for formal reporting on.  Having Ms Allan indicate she will do this means it is likely the matter will go further.)   There is a challenge of course, in removing Knighthoods, as that is not something any New Zealand Government has done before – and at present the Government (like the last one) is taking a long time to respond to a request to rescind the Knighthood bestowed upon Sir Ngatata Love for Services to Māori; (given the High Court has found he committed fraudulent activities against his iwi.)  In this context, Ms Maihi’s petition essentially places perceived offences against Māori on a continuum, and could actually make the current considerations regarding Sir Ngatata more challenging.  The petition can be seen here:

https://www.change.org/p/rt-hon-jacinda-ardern-strip-racist-sir-bob-jones-of-his-knighthood-read-his-vile-rant-here.

  • Last weekend the inaugural national commemoration of the New Zealand Wars, He Rā Maumahara, was held in the Bay of Islands.
  • Last week an Environment Court hearing between Maungaharuru-Tangitu Trust and the Hastings District Council was held. The hearing was regarding the Hastings District Council’s decision to grant resource consent on costal land considered to be wahi taonga, and is required as direct discussions and mediation on the matter have both failed.
  • The Iwi Chairs’ Forum are holding a climate change summit in Wellington on March 24 and 25.

Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry 26 January 2018 (Edition 1/2018)

This week the Prime Minister has released the terms of reference for the proposed Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry. The inquiry is broad in scope, setting out to hear the issues from a people’s perspective, and to make recommendations across all structures within the health and the broader public sector.  The inquiry will be chaired by Professor Ron Paterson, and there are two Māori on the panel of six (Sir Mason Durie and Dean Rangihuna).

This is a policy area of particular importance to Māori, as Māori are significantly over-represented in mental health service areas, and in suicide statistics. We note the terms of reference acknowledge this health inequality, and ask the panel to consider this matter, and to also work in ways appropriate to Māori, and in accordance with the Treaty of Waitangi.  The panel will report back their findings to the Minister of Health by 31 October.  Subscribers working in this sector should see this as a renewed opportunity to influence how Government support in this area is funded and delivered.    The terms of reference are here:

https://www.dia.govt.nz/diawebsite.nsf/Files/Government-Inquiry-into-Mental-Health-and-Addiction/$file/Inquiry-into-Mental-Health-and-Addiction-Terms-of-Reference.pdf

General Article: Plain packaging of Tobacco Products Proposed – 3 June 2016 (18/2016)

 

  1. On Tuesday the Associate Minister of Health, Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga, released draft regulations and a consultation document which aims to standardise the look of cigarette packets.  This release coincided with ‘World Smokefree Day’, and the regulations are those associated with the Smokefree Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill, which the Government intends to pass into law later this year.  In this information release Mr Lotu-liga also positively notes that raising tax on tobacco products is an effective measure for reducing smoking levels. However, a Māori health researcher, Dr Marewa Glover, has publicly opined that increased taxation has not reduced Māori smoking levels, and is instead a punitive ‘bash’ for Māori smokers.  (Circa one third of the Māori adult population is said to consume tobacco products on a regular basis, leading to circa 600 Māori premature deaths per year.)   Consultation on plain packaging matters is open until 29 July;

    http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/standardised-tobacco-products-and-packaging-draft-regulations

     

General Items and Māori News for the Week Ending 26 February 2016 (5/2016)

 

  • Aligned with the freshwater reforms, The Ministry for the Environment has released a Te Mana o Te Wai funding application guide for 2016 (circa 36 pages).  The purpose of the Te Mana o Te Wai Fund is to enable Māori to improve water quality of freshwater bodies by:
    • supporting iwi/hapū to play an active part in improving the water quality of their local freshwater bodies;
    • enabling iwi/hapū to actively participate in managing their local freshwater bodies;
    • developing partnerships and working in collaboration with others; and
    • assisting iwi/hapū and the wider community to recognise the importance of fresh water in supporting a healthy ecosystem, including supporting human health.

http://www.housing.msd.govt.nz/information-for-housing-providers/register/index.html#Prioritisedethnicityofmainapplicantnbsp31Decembernbsp20155

 

  • Professor Wiremu Doherty has been appointed permanent Chief Executive of Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.


[1] Some applicants will then be invited to proceed to stage two.

[2] 2015 data.

[3] Note this is the ethnicity of the primary application on the register for new housing (not the transfer register which is separate).

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 3 July 2015

Appointments

  • Sir Wira Gardiner has been appointed the Chairperson to the Local Government Commission.
  • Michael Pohio has been appointed a director of the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA).
  • Dr Wayne Ngata has been appointed Chair of Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (the Māori Language Commission).
  • Professor Rawinia Higgins and Charisma Rangipunga have been appointed as commissioners to Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (the Māori Language Commission). The appointment is for three years
  • Ron Mark has been elected Deputy Leader of the New Zealand First Party.
  • Dayle Hunia has been appointed to the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) Board.

Māori News for the week ending 3 July 2015

  • Sonny Tau has been stood down as Chairperson of Tūhoronoku, following a recent investigation into his alleged illegal possession of dead kereru. Mr Sam Napia will become the Acting Chairperson.
  • On Wednesday Ngāti Tūwharetoa finalised the purchase of circa 8,500 hectares of property in the central North Island from the Department of Corrections.  The purchase includes the site of the Tongariro-Rangipo Corrections Facility and Hautu Prison Farm.  The Department of Corrections will continue to own prison buildings and will lease-back the prison facility land from the iwi. The right to purchase this land was provided for in the Central North Island Treaty Settlement.  The price of the land is circa $20 million, excluding forestry on the land which was also purchased (the forestry price is undisclosed).
  • On Thursday the Minister of Social Development, Ann Tolley, announced the successful organisations to receive funding from the Capability Investment Resource 2014/2015. Māori focussed organisations are:
  • Ngā Ngaru Rautahi O Aotearoa Incorporated;
  • Te Aratū Trust;
  • Te Hau Ora o Kaikohe Charitable Trust;
  • Te Ora Hou Ōtautahi Incorporated;
  • Te Ora Hou Whanganui Incorporated;
  • Te Rūnanganui o Ngāti Porou Trustee Ltd;
  • Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga Charitable Trust;
  • Tūpoho – Iwi and Community Social Services Trust; and
  • Waikato-Tainui Te Kahanganui Inc
  • On Tuesday the Ministry of Health published (online) data tables on Mortality for 2012.  The table provides information on the underlying causes of all deaths and includes additional information such as age, gender and ethnicity.  Key Māori mortality statistics for 2012 are:
    • 10% of all deaths in New Zealand were Māori. In whole numbers 3,064 Māori died;
    • 35.8% of all deaths among 0 to 5 year olds were Māori. In whole numbers 139 tamariki Māori died;
    • 84.5% of deaths among Māori were attributed to some form of cancer.  In whole numbers circa 2,590 Māori died of a cancer related disease; and
    • 119 Māori died due to suicide.  Of these one was aged between 5 to 9 years, and 7 were aged between 10 and 14 years.
  • Data tables can be sourced at: http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/mortality-2012-online-tables

  • On Tuesday Statistics New Zealand released a fact sheet on people aged 65+ years living in New Zealand. The information which has been sourced from the 2013 Census data shows, on Census evening there were 607,000 people aged 65+ years living in New Zealand. Māori represented 5. 6% (circa 34,000) of people in this age group.The factsheet can be sourced at: http://www.stats.govt.nz/Census/2013-census/profile-and-summary-reports/qstats-65-plus-infographic.aspx