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Settlements

E11 16 April 2021: Māori News Summary

Parliamentary and Related Matters

  • Last Tuesday the third reading of the Local Government (Rating of Whenua Māori) Amendment Bill was completed in Parliament, and passed into law on Monday after receiving Royal Assent.  (The final vote was 65 in favour, with 33 against, National and Act being against this law change.)  Our full review of this law is provided in Pānui edition 6/2020, but in general terms our assessment was:
    • the lack of proper consultation with Māori was poor, showing an ongoing level of paternalism in regard to all thing’s whenua Māori;
    • the change not to issue rating invoices to unused Māori land (or deceased owners) is good for local councils, and goodish for Māori. It means councils do not have to pay input tax and wait six years for a refund for monies they are never going to get, and for Māori it means there is no record of unpaid rates on lands that have no income attached (and therefore no means to pay rates);
    • removing arbitrary rules on the maximum size of marae blocks, urupā, and culturally set aside lands is good, as is ensuring the 164 marae that happen to be on ‘general title’ can also become exempt from rates (like churches and sports clubs), and be treated like other marae built on Māori land;
    • allowing multiple land blocks that function as a single entity (say as a single farm) to be rated as a one is helpful, as it reduces complex accounting for owners; and
    • allowing dwellings on Māori land to be rated individually – rather than as a single collective is also good – it means a whānau building on their lands will not necessarily be responsible for the rating charges of any of their relations on the same block, thereby making it more attractive to build on pāpākainga lands.

Local Government (Rating of Whenua Māori) Amendment Bill – New Zealand Parliament (www.parliament.nz)

 

Last week the first reading of the ‘Social Security (Subsequent Child Policy Removal) Amendment Bill’ was completed in Parliament. The purpose of this Bill is to remove the ‘subsequent child’ policy from the Social Security Act 2018 and Social Security Regulations 2018.

By way of background, under the current law if someone has another child while they are already receiving a main benefit the work obligations do not adjust for that child, and instead remain based on the age of the other children.  In effect it means some beneficiaries with one year old children must complete work obligations or have benefit sanctions.  The current law is said to disproportionately impact Māori and women.

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_109567/social-security-subsequent-child-policy-removal-amendment

Treaty Matters

  • On March 20, Ngāti Paoa and the Crown signed a Deed of Settlement. The deed provides for a financial redress of $23.5 million, the return of 12 sites of cultural significance, and the return of cultural and relationship items.

www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-paoa/

  • On March 24, the Ngāti Rangitihi Claims Settlement Bill was introduced in Parliament. This Bill gives effect to the Deed of Settlement between Ngāti Rangitihi and the Crown. The settlement includes a financial and commercial redress of circa $11 million.

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_109566/ng%C4%81ti-rangitihi-claims-settlement-bill

  • Last Tuesday the third reading of the Ngāti Hinerangi Claims Settlement Bill was completed in Parliament, and will now pass into law. Once enacted this law gives effect to the Deed of Settlement between Ngāti Hinerangi and the Crown, and provides for financial redress of $8.1 million, the return of 14 sites of cultural significance, a cultural revitalisation fund, and five commercial properties.

https://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2019/0171/latest/LMS252113.html

  • On 30 March the Wellington High Court overruled a preliminary determination of the Waitangi Tribunal which favoured allowing Ngāti Kahungunu Ki Wairarapa to obtain a resumption order for lands not within their tribal rohe. Justice Cooke found the Tribunal, if it proceeded, would be in breach of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and was not following tīkanga Māori.

MR-2021-NZHC-654.pdf (courtsofnz.govt.nz)

Appointments and Awards

  • Last weekend Joe Williams was ceremonially knighted at an investiture ceremony at Manaia Marae, in the Coromandel. Justice Sir Williams is the first (and only) Māori to be appointed to the Supreme Court of New Zealand.  (He has also previously been Chief Judge of the Māori Land Court and Chairperson of the Waitangi Tribunal.)
  • The Minister for Broadcasting and Media, Kris Faafoi, has announced a governance group to consider the feasibility of a new public media entity (merging state television and radio entities). Bailey Mackey (Ngāti Porou) has been appointed as one member of the expert group.  Mr Mackey has experience in iwi radio, Māori television and independent Māori media production.
  • Dr Curtis Walker has been re-elected as a member of the Medical Council of New Zealand.
  • Associate Professor Khylee Quince, has been appointed Interim Dean of the School of Law, Auckland University of Technology (AUT).

Salient Māori News Items to 16 April 2021

  • Kiri Allan, Minister of Conservation and Minister of Emergency Management, is undertaking a leave of absence as she undergoes treatment for cervical cancer. Kia kaha wahine toa!
  • The Government has announced funding of $850,000 over two years to support tamariki and rangatahi Māori in the South Island whose whānau are experiencing financial hardship, to participate in sporting activities. e. funding for shoes, sports teams registration fees, uniforms, etc.  The funding (called Te Kīwai) will be jointly managed by Sport New Zealand / Ihi Aotearoa and Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu, with the commissioning agency being responsible for fund distribution to whānau.
  • Last week the Māori Land Court heard an application from a group of beneficiaries of the Mana Ahuriri Trust concerning the operations of their (Treaty Settlement) Trust. The application is for an independent trustee to be appointed and for an investigation to be undertaken into financial transactions regarding some existing trustees.  The allegations are that some trustees hold significant business contracts with which have drained the finances of the trust.
  • This week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) closed Takitimu Seafoods, which is owned by Ngāti Kahungunu Iwi Incorporated. This was due to the failure to renew operating licences on time; however the paperwork is now completed and Takitimu Seafoods is back in business.
  • The ESR Māori Impact Team have published a resource in Te Reo Māori and English entitled He Wai Ora Mahere Mātai i Ngā Waikaukau – Is Our Water Safe for Swimming? The purpose of the resource is to raise awareness about testing the safety levels of water, for drinking or used for gathering kai, and bodies of water used for leisure activities. The resource also includes the protocol required for testing water for the faecal indicator E. coli.

ESR-Water-testing-booklet-GenericEng-Digital.pdf

  • Last week the Electoral Commission referred matters concerning donations to the Māori Party to the Police. It is alleged the Party failed to declare donations or aggregated donations of over $30,000 made to the Party (which combined totalled over $300,000). The Māori Party president, Che Wilson, has acknowledged the referral and the likelihood the Party has breached electoral law.
  • The Government has announced funding of $6 million over four years to retain and attract more Māori and Pasifika to midwifery. The initiative entitled Te Ara ō Hine, will fund a liaison person at each of the five midwifery provider institutes, provide pastoral care, academic support, and targeted recruitment to Māori and Pasifika communities. A discretionary hardship fund for students will also be available.
  • Mangatawa Pāpāmoa Blocks Incorporated (Bay of Plenty) have just finished building three more affordable rental homes, plus three more social housing whare. These houses are specifically for sole parent tāne and their tamariki, and bring the total housing for the Incorporation up to 36.
  • Pare Kore (Zero Waste) has been granted $3 million from the Ministry for the Environment. The funding will support the delivery of Whakapapa ki a Papatūānuku; which is a marae-based training programme that supports whānau, hapū and iwi to reduce waste.
  • Tokomairiro Waiora has received a grant of $54,000 from the Ministry for Primary Industries to support counselling services for rural Māori with addiction and mental health issues in South Otago. Tokomairiro Waiora is a Whānau Ora provider.
  • On Thursday, the Ministry of Social Development released the Benefit Fact Sheets for the quarter ending 31 March 2021. There are no significant shifts for Māori – 31% of Māori adults receive one of the main benefits; and we will provide our full review in the next Pānui.
  • Last week the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment announced the successful recipients for the Te Pūnaha Hihiko – Vision Mātauranga Capability Fund. Sixteen projects will receive funding, as outlined below.
Organisation name Title Other organisations involved Funding

(excl GST)

Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited Advancing equitable wellbeing in rural Aotearoa New Zealand using Te ao Maori in complex Water Management Environment4Health, Te Kereru Associates, Ngāti Rangi, Te Whanau a Apanui $249,000

 

Kapenga M Trust Kapenga Tuna Manaaki National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited $229,000
Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd Weaving the strands: Mātauranga and palaeoecology at the Ōpihi Taniwha rock art site Ngāi Tahu Māori Rock Art Trust $250,000
Massey University

 

He Whenua Pungapunga – Exploring the sustainable use of Te Arawa’s natural pumice resources Tauhara North No. 2 Trust and Zymbl Innovation $250,000
Innovating kaitiaki for indigenous taonga – pupurangi snails

 

Muaūpoko Tribal Authority Inc., Genomics Aotearoa, Genomics for Aotearoa New Zealand, Elshire Group Ltd. $250,000

 

Te Aho Tapu Hou – A New Sacred Thread: Taking Muka Fibre to High Value Textiles to Unlock Sustainable Harakeke-Based Māori Enterprise Rangi Te Kanawa, Region Net Positive Ltd, AgResearch, Aotearoa Back Country Developments Ltd $249,000
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited Kia whakamana te hapū hei penapena rawa to rātou moana – Empowering coastal hapū to manage their rohe moana Ngāti Kere Tangata Kaitiaki representing Ngati Kere hapū for Te Taiapure o Porangahau $250,000
Maaku anoo e hanga i tooku nei whare — Building our own house within a climate change environment Te Taniwha o Waikato, Swampfrog Environmental & Tree Consultants Ltd $250,000
Tātau Tātau o Te Wairoa Trust Te Kawau Tiripou: Mātauranga Māori through GPS as a tool for Iwi and Hapū governance Massey University $250,000
Te Reo Irirangi o te Hiku o te Ika Ko te reo kia tika, ko te reo kia rere: Machine Learning to Support te reo Māori Pronunciation. Dragonfly Data Science $250,000
Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu Limited Kā Ara Tīpuna – Growing intergenerational capacity to meet mahika kai aspirations University of Canterbury, Plant and Food Research Ltd, Keewai Ltd $250,000
The Cawthron Institute Trust Board Te Kete Raukotahi Te Arawa Fisheries Group, Te Runanga o te Whānau $250,000
The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited Te Ao Turoa – Intergenerational Resource Sustainability Te Aroha Witehira Whanau Trust, Kaingahoa Marae Trust, Te Rawhiti Marae Trust $249,500
Innovations in koi processing for regional economic growth and environmental restoration Te Riu o Waikato Ltd (TROWL), Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Inc., AM2 & Associates $185,000
The Research Trust of Victoria University of Wellington Matching Haapu Knowledge with Machine Learning during the Construction of the IT Artefact Te Ruapekapeka Trust $250,000
Whakatohea Māori Trust Board Hei Arahi i te Ahurea Matihiko o Whakatōhea – Building Capacity for Digital Curation and Cultural Research University of Waikato $250,000

E27 Salient Māori News Items to 21 August 2020

  • On Monday the Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, announced that the General Election will now be held on October 17, 2020.
  • Last week the Minister of Defence, Ron Marks announced that former soldier George Nepata will receive a formal apology from the Government and the New Zealand Defence Force for the New Zealand Defence Force’s failure to provide him with a safe system of work and the 31 years he has struggled with his tetraplegia. Mr Nepata has also been awarded an ex gratia payment (amount undisclosed).
  • Last week a Deed of Settlement was initialed between Ngāti Maru and the Crown (this is the last of the eight Taranaki iwi to reach this stage in the settlement process). The settlement provides for commercial / financial redress of circa $30 million.
  • Ngahiwi Tomoana and Takurua Mutu have been appointed to the Tourism Futures Taskforce. This seven-member taskforce will advise government on what changes can be made to the tourism sector as it looks to rebuild from the impacts of COVID -19.
  • On Wednesday, Roberta Little, the former Principal of Te Kura o Waikaremoana, was sentenced in the Gisborne District Court to nine-months home detention and ordered to pay reparation of $45,000 after pleaded guilty to dishonestly and theft charges. Ms Little, along with Moana Shuttleworth stole circa $103,000 from the kura between 2015 and 2017.[1]
  • Te Whānau-ā-Apanui, Ngāti Porou, and the Department of Conservation will work together on an employment project called Raukūmara Pae Maunga. This project involves the pest control of 150,000 hectares in and around the Raukūmara Forest and it is expected to create over 40 fulltime and seasonal jobs.

[1] Ms Shuttleworth was a former board of trustee representative who had earlier been convicted of these crimes.

Salient Māori News Items to 20 September 2019

 

  • On Thursday the Te Ture Whenua Māori (Succession, Dispute Resolution, and Related Matters) Amendment Bill was introduced in Parliament. The purpose of this bill is to simplify Māori Land Court processes including the process for Māori land succession. Refer to Pānui edition 24/2019 for background on this bill.
  • This week the Ministry for Culture and Heritage announced that the replica of Captain Cook’s ship the Endeavour will not visit the Mangonui inlet. The visit was removed from the itinerary following complaints regarding the Ministry’s failure to conduct a proper consultation process with Ngāti Kahu iwi. The replica of the Endeavour is touring ports and docks around New Zealand as part of the national commemoration marking 250 years since Captain Cook’s arrival in Aotearoa.
  • Applications are now open for the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment Te Pūnaha Hihiko – Vision Mātauranga Capability Fund 2020. The fund is open to people and organisations undertaking or planning research which supports the themes of the Vision Mātauranga Policy:
    • indigenous innovation,
    • taiao (achieving environmental sustainability),
    • hauora/oranga (improving health and social wellbeing) and,
    • mātauranga (exploring indigenous knowledge).
      The fund value is circa $4 million. Proposals close midday 14 November.
  • The Kiingitanga movement has advised mana whenua that they would like the lands at Ihumātao returned, although they consider that it falls outside of Treaty Settlement processes therefore the Government may need to negotiate with Fletchers to achieve that.
  • This week Dave Samuels commenced his appointment as Chief Executive of Te Puni Kōkiri.
  • On Thursday the first reading of the Ngāti Hinerangi Claims Settlement Bill was completed in Parliament. The bill includes a financial redress of $8.1 million, the return of 14 sites of cultural significance, a cultural revitalisation fund, and five commercial properties. https://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-hinerangi/

E32A Māori News week ending 13 September 2019

Parliamentary Matters

  • On Tuesday the Ngāti Hinerangi Claims Settlement Bill was introduced in Parliament. This Bill provides for financial redress of $8.1 million, the return of 14 sites of cultural significance, a cultural revitalisation fund, and five commercial properties.

http://www.govt.nz/treaty-settlement-documents/ngati-hinerangi/

  • On Thursday the first reading of Te Pire kia Unuhia te Hara kai Runga i a Rua Kēnana / Rua Kēnana Pardon Bill, was completed in Parliament. This Bill recognises and addresses the crimes against the Tūhoe prophet, Rua Kēnana, and his community of Maungapōhatu. In 1916 Rua was arrested and charged with sedition, and although he was found not guilty, he was still imprisoned for over eighteen months for resisting arrest.  A statutory pardon is being considered.

Appointments and Awards

  • Antoine Coffin (Ngaiterangi, Ngāti Ranginui, Raukawa) has been appointed to the Resource Management Review Panel. The panel will advise Government on the Resource Management Act and matters concerning freshwater, urban environment, waste and hazardous substances.
  • Topia Rameka (Ngāti Tūwharetoa) has been appointed as the inaugural Deputy Chief Executive – Māori for Ara Poutama Aotearoa – Department of Corrections.
  • Hayden Wano (Te Atiawa, Taranaki, Ngāti Awa) has been appointed to and named chair of the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • Dr Julie Wharewera-Mika (Ngāti Awa, Ngāi Tuhoe, Te Whānau-a-Apanui) has been appointed a member of the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • On Wednesday the Prime Ministers’ Education Excellence Awards were held in Wellington. Award winners included Te Kōhanga Reo ki Rotokawa, Excellence in Teaching and Learning and Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae, 2019 Focus Prize.

General News Items

  • This week Snap Reo, an online micro Te Reo learning programme, was launched. Snap Reo is funded by Te Māngai Pāho.
  • This week the Financial Markets Authority and Institute of Directors published ‘Ngā Mea Waiwai o te Tūranga Whakataka’ a Te Reo version of ‘The Essentials of Being a Director’. The resource is a guidebook for directors, and Traci Haupapa, Chair of the Federation of Māori Authorities (FoMA), notes it shows an increased commitment to diversity and inclusivity from the Authority. https://www.fma.govt.nz/assets/Guidance/IoD-FMA-Director-Essentials-in-Maori.pdf
  • On Tuesday the Government conjointly released ‘Every Life Matters, Suicide Prevention Strategy 2019 – 2029’ and an ‘Action Plan 2019 – 2024’. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and the Minister for Health, Dr David Clark, also announced that a designated Suicide Prevention Office will be established along with the establishment of a Māori Advisory group and Lived Experience group. This is a significant announcement as the Māori suicide rate is 28.2 per 100,000 tangata compared to the New Zealand overall rate of 13.9 per 100,000 people.
  • On Thursday Prime Minister Ardern and Minister Clark also released the draft terms of reference for the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. The Commission will provide independent scrutiny of the Government’s progress in improving New Zealand’s mental health and wellbeing, promote collaboration between entities that contribute to mental health and wellbeing, and develop advice and a framework for the permanent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission.
  • On Thursday Prime Minister Ardern also announced that the National School Curriculum is to be updated to make explicit the expectation of content taught within the New Zealand’s history curriculum. The changes will take effect for all schools and kura, years 1 – 10, in early 2022. Currently the National Curriculum enables schools and kura to decide how New Zealand history is covered. It is expected that the new curriculum will cover the following topics:
    • arrival of Māori to Aotearoa New Zealand;
    • first encounters and early colonial history;
    • Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and its history;
    • colonisation of, and immigration to, Aotearoa New Zealand, including the New Zealand Wars;
    • evolving national identity of Aotearoa New Zealand in the late 19th and early 20th centuries;
    • Aotearoa New Zealand’s role in the Pacific; and
    • Aotearoa New Zealand in the late 20th century and evolution of a national identity with cultural plurality.
  • This week Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust opened a show home for the trust’s Te Puna Wai Papakāinga Housing Project, in Wainuiomata. Te Puna Wai is a mixed tenure housing development that will be completed over two stages.  The trust has received from Te Puni Kōkiri a $2.6 million investment grant to support infrastructure costs for 23 housing sites, and the construction of 11 kaumātua rental homes. The trust plans to build 80 dwellings in total.
  • This week the Ministry for the Environment commenced a series of public consultation and feedback hui on freshwater issues, productive land, urban environment, waste and hazardous substances management. Consultation for the various issues closes late September to mid-October 2019. Dates and locations for upcoming Māori specific hui are listed in the table below.
Date Location Time Venue
16 September Blenheim 10:30am – 1:30pm Scenic Hotel
17 September Tauranga 9.00am – 12.00pm Hotel Armitage
18 September Greymouth 12.00pm – 3.00pm Ashley Hotel
18 September Whakatāne 9.00am – 12.00pm Manukatutahi Marae
19 September Rotorua 12:00pm – 3:00pm Te Ao Marama
23 September Gisborne 11:30am – 2:30pm Emerald Hotel
24 September Wairoa 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed
24 September Hamilton 11.00am – 2.00pm Hamilton Gardens Pavillion
25 September Napier 1.00pm – 4.00pm East Pier Hotel
25 September Auckland 12:30pm – 3:30pm Potters Park Events Centre
26 September Whangarei 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed
27 September Kaitaia 10:30am – 1:30pm To be confirmed

Salient Māori News Items for the Week to 22 February 2019

 

  • Last Friday the Minister for Land Information, Eugenie Sage, announced her decision that Tūranganui-a-Kiwa / Poverty Bay was now the official name for what was formally called – in legal contexts – Poverty Bay.
  • Last week the Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson, with the Minister of Conservation, Eugenie Sage, announced the launch of ‘Ka Hao te Rangatahi’. This is a new training programme based in Ruatoria, focused on developing conservation skills and erosion management for youth who are not in employment, education or training.
  • A Waitangi Tribunal hearing commenced this week concerning Wai 2573, which is ‘the Mana Ahuriri Deed of Settlement (Ngāti Pārau) claim’. Ngāti Pārau claimants are challenging the mandate of the Mana Ahuriri post settlement governance entity, on the basis that due processes were not followed in the enacting of this settlement.
  • Last Friday Ngāti Paoa negotiators signed the Hauraki Collective deed of settlement – despite opposition from within the Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust. This means six of the twelve Hauraki iwi have now agreed to the collective deed of settlement. (The Pare Hauraki Collective redress includes a settlement worth circa $250 million in total, the return of two Maunga Moehau and Te Aroha, along with 25,000 hectares of commercial forests. The collective consists of twelve Hauraki iwi: Hako; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki; Ngāti Hei; Ngāti Maru; Ngāti Paoa; Ngāti Porou ki Hauraki; Ngāti Pūkenga; Ngāti Rāhiri Tumutumu; Ngāti Tamaterā; Ngāti Tara Tokanui; Ngaati Whanaunga; and Te Patukirikiri.    There has been significant opposition to various aspects of this broader settlement process, including from Ngāi Te Rangi iwi members who are opposed to Hauraki iwi being represented on a Tauranga Moana governance group, and from Ngāti Whātua who opposed Ngāti Paoa being offered property in central Auckland.)

Māori News Stories for the Week Ending 17 April 2015

Treaty Settlements

  • Ngāti Hineuru and the Crown signed a Deed of Settlement on 2 April 2015. The settlement includes $25 million financial and commercial redress, along with cultural redress and a Crown acknowledgement and apology.

Appointments 

  • Sir Harawira Gardiner, Riria Te Kanawa and George Reedy have been appointed to the board of Te Huarahi Tika Trust.  Steve Murray has been appointed as a director to Hautaki Ltd (the commercial subsidiary of Te Huarahi Tika Trust).
  • Rachael Tūwhangai has been appointed to board of the Manukau Institute of Technology.
  • Last Tuesday the Minister for Māori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell, and the Minister of Science and Innovation, Steven Joyce announced three new consortium groups who have been selected to deliver Māori and Pasifika trade training. The new provider consortiums are; Bay of Plenty Polytechnic and Ngā Pōtiki ā Tamapāhore; Taranaki Futures Trust; and Te Pū Wānanga o Anamata.
  • On Monday the Minister of Education, Hekia Parata, announced that $244 million will be allocated in the 2015/16 Budget to fund four new schools, and three new kura kaupapa Māori.  The kura kaupapa will be built in Whakatāne, Gisborne and Hastings.
  • On Wednesday the Minister for Māori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell, and the Minister of Science and Innovation, Steven Joyce, announced the thirteen organisations that will receive Vision Mātauranga Science Funding this year.  In total $1.9 million was allocated across seventeen distinct projects.  The successful organisations and proposals are outlined below
Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited Flounder Enhancement in the Marlborough Sounds $180,000
Institute for Plant and Food Research Te Awanui Huka Pak Innovation $180,000
Institute for Plant and Food Research China consumer insights, a Pathway to Premium for Māori food brands $100,000
NorthTec Scoping the development by Pehiaweri Marae hub & NorthTec of a Tikanga Maori focused digital literacy $180,000
KMAHE Digital Media Platform for Livestreaming, Broadcasting, and Content Management $180,000
AgResearch Te Kakenga Ngātahi i te Ara Poutama $100,000
Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Te Kura Whenua – building an understanding of earth science for informed decision making $100,000
Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Kā Rongo te Hā o Rūaumoko – Understanding the impacts of air pollution $99,900
Landcare Research Strengthening relationships between CRIs of the Te Ara Putaiao (TAP) partnership, Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and Māori landowners, development of a new methodology for risks and potential rewards of land use $100,000
Cawthron Institute Kia Mahitahi – working together to improve water quality and river well-being $100,000
Lincoln University Establishing a National Māori Biosecurity Network $100,000
University of Canterbury O Kahukura, O Marokura: Integrating kaitiaki, science and education $99,900
Te Whāriki Manawāhine o Hauraki, Te Poipoia Tūkino o Hauraki IT applications for the diffusion of mātauranga Māori social norms that are known to reduce the impacts of whānau violence $23,000
New Zealand Forest Research Institute Mātauranga Whakarewarewa – developing tamariki science knowledge for the future $66,000
University of Waikato Te Waka a Tama-rereti: Networking Māori Expertise in Genomics, Informatics and Technology $99,000
Massey University Tūpuna kai – Reconnecting New Zealand Māori with the benefits of traditional food $92,000
Groundtruth Limited Integrating mātauranga and science for land management that provides economic growth and supports biodiversity $95,000

 

E1A 24 January 2014 Māori news stories 21 December to 24 January 2014

 

This paper provides a summary of key Māori interest news items from 21 December to 24 January 2014. Analytical assessments of policy matters will be provided in regular Pānui briefs.

Appointments, honours and nominations

* 2014 New Year’s Honours’ list recipients for Service to Māori were:

Knights Companion (KNZM);

o Dr Noble Thomson Curtis

Officers of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM)

o Hekenukumai Busby

o Marjorie Joe

Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM)

o Kathleen Jehly

o Amoroa Luke

Queens Service Medal (QSM)

o Kingiareta Biddle

o Reverend Judith Cooper1

* Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, (The Māori Language Commission / Te Taura Whiri) has established a new Māori Language Research Centre, He Puna Whakarauroa. The current Chief Executive of Te Taura Whiri, Glenis Philip-Barbara, will become the establishment Chief Executive of the Centre. Pita Paraone has been appointed Acting Chief Executive of Te Taura Whiri.

* Dame Iritana Tawhiwhirangi and Dr Lance O’Sullivan have been nominated for the 2014 Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year award (amongst others). The winner will be announced on 26 February.

* On Tuesday the Prime Minister, John Key, confirmed that the National Party has an ongoing interest in maintaining a relationship agreement with the Māori Party (and others), after the 2014 election (should the National Party be returned to govern). Mr Key also delivered a ‘state of the nation’ speech on Thursday, although we note this did not discuss any issues specific to Māori. However he, and other leaders of the main political parties are arriving at Ratana Pā today to commemorate the birth of Tahupōtiki Rātana. We will be reviewing speech materials from these celebrations and will provide a summary assessment of any relevant policy matters in Pānui edition 2/2014.

* The Speaker of the House, David Carter, has requested a review of pōwhiri protocols at parliament, particularly in relation to establishing appropriate seating arrangements for female dignities. He has indicated a preference to modernise arrangements within parliament, to ensure acceptability to a diversified parliament, whilst appropriately upholding iwi protocols.

* In December, Norwegian company Statoil was granted an oil exploration permit for the Reinga-Northland Basin. Te Rarawa Iwi Chair, Haami Piripi, has indicated that although Te Rarawa does not support the exploration activities, he is formally requesting that the Government establish an iwi-led oil-exploration monitoring programme. This request will be made at upcoming iwi leaders-to-Crown Waitangi meetings.

* On 24 December the Waitangi Tribunal ruled on the application for an urgent hearing for WAI 2417. This claim, filed by the New Zealand Māori Council, relates to processes adopted by the Crown for the reform of the Māori Community Development Act 1962. (This is the establishment Act for the Māori Council and the Māori Wardens.) The Tribunal ruled in favour of the claimants (the New Zealand Māori Council), and has indicated that an urgency hearing should be held in March this year. Pānui 36/2013 outlines the three initial aspects of the claim (two of which were determined to meet the threshold for urgency).2 The Tribunal ruling from Judge Fox is 18-pages but is summarised in the following paragraph:

“We consider that there are grounds for urgency as this is an exceptional case because of the unique nature of this claim, the history of the legislation and its recognition of the right of Māori to self-government, the unique nature of the Council system and the inextricable link and development of the Māori Wardens under the agency of Māori communities and the District Councils.”

 

* In late December Mana Ahuriri (a collective of hapū in Napier) signed an Agreement in Principle with the Crown. The agreement includes financial and commercial redress of $19.5 million.3

* On 23 December, the Waitangi Tribunal released a Mangatū Remedies Report.4 The Tribunal agreed all applicants had well-founded claims, but declined to make binding recommendations to return forestry lands; as any such rulings could not be assured to be fair and equitable between claimant groups, and/or proportionate to the nature of the Treaty breaches.

Treaty matters: from E43 week ending 7 December 2012

Ngāti Pāoa sign Tāmaki Collective Deed of Settlement

Last Saturday Ngāti Pāoa became the eleventh iwi to sign the Tāmaki Collective Deed of Settlement in Auckland.  In September ten iwi initially signed the deed (refer pānui E32/2012 for details on this settlement).

Ngāti Toa signs Deed of Settlement

Today Ngāti Toa signed a Deed of Settlement with the Crown.  The total value of the settlement is circa $75 million (comprised of redress of $70 million, plus interest, plus capacity building payments.)  The settlement also includes the right to purchase a number of Crown properties in the Wellington region, including the Wellington Police Station.  Cultural redress includes the vesting of Kapiti and Taputeranga islands with the iwi, and the subsequent return of these to the Crown (although the iwi will retain ownership of a small proportion of Kapiti Island).  Te Rauparaha will also be recognised in the settlement legislation as the composer of Ka Mate, Ka Mate.

Select Committee Report on the Ngāti Manuhiri Claims Settlement Bill: E26 from week ending 3 August 2012

Last week the Māori Affairs Select Committee released its report-back on the Ngāti Manuhiri Claims Settlement Bill. A key feature of this proposed settlement is the vesting of Te Hauturu-o-Toi (Little Barrier Island) for seven days with Ngāti Manuhiri, before the island is gifted back to the people of New Zealand.3 Some members of Ngāti Wai have objected to this aspect of the settlement.

Given these objections, the Committee recommends an amendment to the bill allowing for the possibility of other iwi becoming involved in the co-governance of Te Hauturu-o-Toi, under future Treaty settlements (i.e. Ngāti Wai and/or Ngāti Rehua). In our assessment, this appears to be a sensible option, and we note that Ngāti Manuhiri has now accepted this position, and has/will agree an amendment to its original Deed of Settlement with the Crown.

 

3 Note 1.2 hectares would remain in the ownership of the Ngāti Manuhiri post-settlement governance entity.

Māori news stories for the week ending 24 February 2012

  • Pat Bolstad, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa passed away on Tuesday. Mrs Bolstad worked within the Kohanga Reo and Te Ataarangi moments in the Wairarapa.
  • Vanessa Eparaima, has been elected as chairperson of the Raukawa Settlement Trust.
  • A delegation of 20 Māori, including academics, scientists, community leaders, artists and business people will visit India from 27 February to 11 March 2012. The delegation aims to enhance business, cultural and educational relations between India and Māori.
  • On Tuesday the Kaihanga Collective was launched. This group comprises of former Māori trade training participants in Christchurch. The collective intends to work together to broker contracts; and to provide mentoring and advocacy services for current Māori apprentices in the Christchurch region.
  • On Tuesday Nga Maia – Māori Midwives Collective new national office was official opened in Hastings. Nga Maia was relocated out of Christchurch following the earthquakes last year.
  • Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa / Tamaki Nui a Rua have commenced a series of nine hui seeking a mandate to commence treaty settlement negotiations with the Crown.
  • The trial of the ‘Urewera Four’ continued this week.

Ministerial Inquiry panel members and the Terms of Reference (TOR) for the inquiry into the operation of fishing vessels, including foreign charter vessels (FCV), in New Zealand’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ) waters

  This week the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Phil Heatley and Minister of Labour, Kate Wilkinson announced the Ministerial Inquiry panel members and the Terms of Reference (TOR) for the inquiry into the operation of fishing vessels, including foreign charter vessels (FCV), in New Zealand’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ) waters.

Ngāti Manawa take action against Central North Island iwi

Ngāti Manawa has lodged a High Court application, taking action against Ngāi Tuhoe, Ngāti Whakaue, Ngāti Rangitihi, Ngāti Tuwharetoa, Ngāti Raukawa and Central North Island Iwi Holdings Limited (CNIIHL) Board for failing to allocate 176,000 hectares of the Kaingaroa forest as part of the Treaty of Waitangi  Central North Island (CNI) iwi treaty settlement.  

The court proceedings will seek to have the CNI Deed cancelled under the Contractual Mistakes Act 1977, declared void pursuant to the common law and/or seek damages pursuant to the Contractual Remedies Act.  AlsoNgāti Manawa  will seek to have the land subject to the claims of Ngāti Manawa and the income derived from thatland held in trust pending resolution of the mana whenua of the lands.

The dealine for allocation was July 1, 2011